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Tuesday, January 31, 2017

Catholic News World : Tuesday January 31, 2017 - SHARE

2017

#Novena to Our Lady Help of Christians of St. John Bosco - SHARE #Miracle Prayer



Everyday of the Novena: 
Our Father...
Hail Mary, full of grace…
Glory Be...
V. Pray for us, O Immaculate, Help of Christians
R. That we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.
Let us pray
Heavenly Father, place deep in our hearts the love of Mary, our help and the help of all Christians. May we
fight vigorously for the faith here on earth, and may
we one day praise your victories in heaven. Grant this
in the name of Jesus Christ, your Son, our Lord.
Amen.
First Day
O Mary, you readily agreed to the Angel’s request when you were asked to be the mother of God’s Son, and throughout your life your one desire was to do the will of your Father in heaven. Help me always to be obedient and humble. May I, like you, always have the generosity to follow Jesus, wherever he calls.
(add in this moment all your personal intentions)

Second Day
O Mary, by your visit to your cousin, Saint Elizabeth, you joyfully spread the good news of the coming of Jesus into the world. May many young people generously follow your example, and give their lives totally to the service of your Son as priests, brothers and sisters.
(add in this moment all your personal intentions)
Third Day
O Mary, ever since the wedding feast of Cana you have always been the powerful help of all those who have asked your aid and protection. By your prayers, keep me free from all dangers and help me always to rise above my faults and failings.
(add in this moment all your personal intentions)
Fourth Day
O Mary, by your presence at the foot of the cross, you comforted and strengthened your son as he offered his life to the Father. Be with me at the hour of my death, and lead me quickly to the joys of your Son’s kingdom in heaven.
(add in this moment all your personal intentions)
Fifth Day
O Mary, by your presence in the upper room you strengthened and encouraged the apostles and disciples as they waited for the coming of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost. May I always be open to the gifts of the Spirit, and may my faith always be deep and living.
(add in this moment all your personal intentions)
Sixth Day
O Mary, throughout her long history you have always defended your Son’s Church from the attacks of her enemies. Be with her again in our days. Help each one of us to be her loyal subjects and to work without ceasing for that unity of peace and love for which your Son so fervently prayed.
(add in this moment all your personal intentions)
Seventh Day
O Mary, you have always been the special guide and protector of Saint Peter’s successor, the Bishop of Rome. Keep our present Holy Father in your loving care. Defend him from all harm and give him all those gifts he needs to be the faithful shepherd of your Son’s flock.
(add in this moment all your personal intentions)
Eight Day
O Mary, the wonderful way you helped Saint John Bosco’s work to grow and spread shows that you have a great love for the young. As you watched over the child Jesus at Nazareth, so now watch over all young people, especially those most in need, and help them to grow daily in love of your Son.
(add in this moment all your personal intentions)
Ninth Day
O Mary, you so often showed great courage during your life here on earth. Help all those who are suffering pain and persecution as they try to worship your Son. Obtain for me a deep love of Jesus, so that my life may always be pure, my service of others generous and loving, and my death a truly happy one.
(add in this moment all your personal intentions)
Source: Salesians of St. Don Bosco
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#PopeFrancis "...the peculiarity of Jesus’ gaze: He does not standardize people; He looks at each person.” #Homily

(Vatican Radio)  If we keep our eyes constantly fixed on Jesus, we will discover with surprise that it is he who looks lovingly upon each of us. That was Pope Francis’ message on Tuesday at his morning Mass in the Casa Santa Marta.
Jesus does not seek popularity, but is always among people
The author of Hebrews exhorts us to run in the faith "with perseverance, keeping our eyes fixed on Jesus." In the Gospel, Jesus looks at us and sees us. Pope Francis explained that he is close to us, he "is always in the crowd":
  • “He didn’t walk around with guards to protect him, so that the people could not touch him. No, no! He stayed there and people surrounded him. And there were more people around every time Jesus went out. Statisticians might have been inclined to publish: ‘Rabbi Jesus’ popularity is falling’. But he sought something else: he sought people. And the people sought him. The people had their gaze fixed on him and he had his fixed on them. ‘Yes, yes, on the people, on the multitude’ – ‘No, on each individual!’. This is the peculiarity of Jesus’ gaze: He does not standardize people; He looks at each person.”
Jesus sees both great and small things
The Gospel of Mark narrates two miracles: Jesus heals a woman suffering from hemorrhaging for 12 years who, though pressed by the crowd, was able to touch his cloak. And he realizes that he was touched. Then, he raises the twelve year-old daughter of Jairus, a leader of the synagogue. He understands that the girl is hungry and tells her parents to give her something to eat:
  • “The gaze of Jesus falls on both the big and the small. That's how Jesus sees us all: He sees all things, but looks at each of us. He sees our big problems, our greatest joys, and also looks at the little things about us. Because he is close. Jesus is not afraid of the big things, but also takes account of the small ones. That's how Jesus looks at us.”
The surprise of encountering Jesus
If we run “with perseverance, keeping our eyes fixed on Jesus”, Pope Francis said, “we will be ‘completely astonished’, just as happened to the people after the raising of Jairus’ daughter”:
  • “I go forward, looking at Jesus. I walk ahead, keeping my gaze fixed on Jesus, and what do I find? That he has his gaze fixed on me! And that makes me feel this great astonishment. This is the astonishment of the encounter with Jesus. But let us not be afraid! We are not afraid, just as that woman was not afraid to touch Jesus’ mantle. Let us not be afraid! Let us run down this road with our gaze ever fixed on Jesus. And we will have a beautiful surprise: He will fill us with awe. Jesus himself has his gaze fixed on me.”

(Devin Sean Watkins)

    Free Catholic Movie : Don Bosco : The Story of St. John Bosco

    Free Catholic Movies: DON BOSCO
    This is the story of Don (Father) Bosco, also known in the Catholic church as St. John Bosco. This 19th century Italian priest worked in the city of Torino (Turin). He founded the Salesian order dedicated to teaching and youth work. That work continues worldwide today.
    Don Bosco (1988) 108 min - Drama | History - 30 September 1988 (Italy)
    Director: Leandro Castellani
    Writers: Corrado Biggi (dialogue adaptation for dubbing), Silvano Buzzo (screenplay)
    Stars: Ben Gazzara, Patsy Kensit, Karl Zinny
     For English Captions - Click CC at bottom of screen, then click "ON", then click "translate captions", then select "English", then select "OK"

    Today's Mass Readings and Video : Tuesday January 31, 2017 - #Eucharist


    Memorial of Saint John Bosco, Priest
    Lectionary: 324


    Reading 1HEB 12:1-4

    Brothers and sisters:
    Since we are surrounded by so great a cloud of witnesses,
    let us rid ourselves of every burden and sin that clings to us
    and persevere in running the race that lies before us
    while keeping our eyes fixed on Jesus,
    the leader and perfecter of faith.
    For the sake of the joy that lay before him
    Jesus endured the cross, despising its shame,
    and has taken his seat at the right of the throne of God.
    Consider how he endured such opposition from sinners,
    in order that you may not grow weary and lose heart.
    In your struggle against sin
    you have not yet resisted to the point of shedding blood. 

    Responsorial PsalmPS 22:26B-27, 28 AND 30, 31-32

    R. (see 27b) They will praise you, Lord, who long for you.
    I will fulfill my vows before those who fear him.
    The lowly shall eat their fill;
    they who seek the LORD shall praise him:
    "May your hearts be ever merry!"
    R. They will praise you, Lord, who long for you.
    All the ends of the earth
    shall remember and turn to the LORD;
    All the families of the nations
    shall bow down before him.
    To him alone shall bow down
    all who sleep in the earth;
    Before him shall bend
    all who go down into the dust.
    R. They will praise you, Lord, who long for you.
    And to him my soul shall live;
    my descendants shall serve him.
    Let the coming generation be told of the LORD
    that they may proclaim to a people yet to be born
    the justice he has shown.
    R. They will praise you, Lord, who long for you.

    AlleluiaMT 8:17

    R. Alleluia, alleluia.
    Christ took away our infirmities
    and bore our diseases.
    R. Alleluia, alleluia.

    GospelMK 5:21-43

    When Jesus had crossed again in the boat to the other side,
    a large crowd gathered around him, and he stayed close to the sea.
    One of the synagogue officials, named Jairus, came forward.
    Seeing him he fell at his feet and pleaded earnestly with him, saying,
    "My daughter is at the point of death.
    Please, come lay your hands on her
    that she may get well and live."
    He went off with him
    and a large crowd followed him.

    There was a woman afflicted with hemorrhages for twelve years.
    She had suffered greatly at the hands of many doctors
    and had spent all that she had.
    Yet she was not helped but only grew worse.
    She had heard about Jesus and came up behind him in the crowd
    and touched his cloak.
    She said, "If I but touch his clothes, I shall be cured."
    Immediately her flow of blood dried up.
    She felt in her body that she was healed of her affliction.
    Jesus, aware at once that power had gone out from him,
    turned around in the crowd and asked, "Who has touched my clothes?"
    But his disciples said to him,
    "You see how the crowd is pressing upon you,
    and yet you ask, Who touched me?"
    And he looked around to see who had done it.
    The woman, realizing what had happened to her,
    approached in fear and trembling.
    She fell down before Jesus and told him the whole truth.
    He said to her, "Daughter, your faith has saved you.
    Go in peace and be cured of your affliction."

    While he was still speaking,
    people from the synagogue official's house arrived and said,
    "Your daughter has died; why trouble the teacher any longer?"
    Disregarding the message that was reported,
    Jesus said to the synagogue official,
    "Do not be afraid; just have faith."
    He did not allow anyone to accompany him inside
    except Peter, James, and John, the brother of James.
    When they arrived at the house of the synagogue official,
    he caught sight of a commotion,
    people weeping and wailing loudly.
    So he went in and said to them,
    "Why this commotion and weeping?
    The child is not dead but asleep."
    And they ridiculed him.
    Then he put them all out.
    He took along the child's father and mother
    and those who were with him
    and entered the room where the child was.
    He took the child by the hand and said to her, "Talitha koum,"
    which means, "Little girl, I say to you, arise!"
    The girl, a child of twelve, arose immediately and walked around.
    At that they were utterly astounded.
    He gave strict orders that no one should know this
    and said that she should be given something to eat.

    #PopeFrancis offers prayers for victims families of Quebec City attack in Mosque that killed 5 and injured many


    (Vatican Radio) On Monday morning, following the usual Mass at the Pope’s residence in the Casa Santa Marta, the Holy Father met with Cardinal Gérald Cyprien LaCroix, assuring the Archbishop of Quebec City of his prayers for the victims of the attack on a mosque there on Sunday night.
    Pope Francis stressed the importance of for all, Christians and Muslims, to be united in prayer. Following his meeting with the Pope, Cardinal Lacroix returned immediately to Canada.
    The Holy Father also formally expressed his condolences for the victims of the terrorist attack in a telegram addressed to Cardinal Lacroix, and signed by the Vatican Secretary of State, Cardinal Pietro Parolin. The full text of the telegram, written in French, is provided below in an English translation:
    Telegram concerning the attack on a mosque in Quebec City:
    Most Eminent Cardinal Gérald Cyprien LaCroix
    Having learned of the attack which occurred in Quebec in a prayer room of the Islamic Cultural Centre, which claimed many victims, His Holiness Pope Francis entrusts to the mercy of God the persons who lost their lives and he associates himself through prayer with the pain of their relatives. He expresses his profound sympathy for the wounded and their families, and to all who contributed to their aid, asking the Lord to bring them comfort and consolation in the ordeal. The Holy Father again strongly condemns the violence that engenders such suffering; and, imploring God for the gift of mutual respect and peace, he invokes upon the sorely tried families, and upon all persons touched by this tragedy, as well as upon all Quebecers, the benefits of the divine Blessing.
    Cardinal Pietro Parolin
    Secretary of State of His Holiness

    Monday, January 30, 2017

    Saint January 31 : St. John Bosco : Patron of: Editors, #Publishers, #Schoolchildren, #Young people

    Today, January 31, we celebrate the feast day of Saint John Bosco (1815-1888), Salesians Father, Founder, Confessor, and teacher and patron saint of youth. Saint John worked tirelessly throughout his life to provide education and spiritual instruction to the poor and orphaned children of the world. The orders he founded continue to pursue that mission today. Saint John is remembered for accepting anyone, loving everyone, saying: “A piece of Heaven fixes everything.”
    John was born in Turin, in the Piedmont region of Northern Italy, to a peasant family. His father died when John was only two years old, leaving he and his two brothers in the solitary care of his mother. The family, quite poor, struggled to make ends meet, and John began to work as soon as he was old enough to correctly manipulate tools. He also demonstrated piety and devotion to the Lord from an early age, and professed his wish to become a priest at the age of nine, following a dream. His goal, even from that early age, was to assist youth who suffered in the same manner in which he did. John wished to spread the word of the Gospel, even as a child. He demonstrated great initiative and creativity and learned magic tricks and acrobatics in an attempt to gather an audience so that he could later evangelize and catechize the children and adults of his town. He would begin with a prayer, and while he still had a crows, would often repeat the homily he had heard in church earlier in the week.
    His mother approved his wish to become a priest, but to make that happen, John would have to leave home to receive an education in the city. Being larger than his peers, and noticeably more impoverished, John was the constant focus of his classmates’ ridicule and teasing. To pay for his education, John spent his evenings working in whatever capacity he could—as a tailor, cobbler, and a waiter—returning back to his small room to study through the night be candlelight. Upon graduation, he began his studies for the priesthood.
    Like most things he set his mind to, John Bosco was ordained a priest at only twenty-six. During his time as a seminarian, he devoted his spare hours to looking after the urchins who roamed the slums of the city. Every Sunday he taught them catechism, supervised their games and entertained them with stories and tricks. He spent weekdays recruiting the roughest and dirtiest he could find, inviting them to the Sunday gatherings. Before long, his kindness had won their confidence, and his “Sunday School” became a ritual with them.
    Upon ordination, Saint John immediately sought to formalize his ministry to the poor boys of the city, opening a hospice. When he was unable to secure a building in a “good” section of town, he took one in the slums. This first “oratory” was soon joined by three others, as educators and religious sought to join him in his ministry. His mother joined him as well, serving as housekeeper. Saint John fed and clothed the boys, but also spent long hours providing them with a basic education, and teaching them skills to obtain employment. Within the hospice was a tailoring and shoemaking room, as well as a printing press. Above all, he instructed the boys in the Gospel, modeling by example the life of Jesus Christ, and creating the atmosphere of a Christian family built on trust and love.
    Noting the transformation of the youth he ministered to, Don (Father) Bosco began to gather followers to him, who accepted him as their spiritual advisor, leader, and guide. As their number grew, the Salesian Society of priests and lay brothers was formed. Named after Saint Francis de Sales, noted for his gentleness and kindness, Saint John Bosco dedicated this new society to the saint. Saint John traveled to Rome in 1858, and met with Pope Pius IX who encouraged his new religious community. Four years later, he founded an order for women, The Daughters of Mary, Help of Christians, to care for abandoned girls in the same manner.
    By 1868, over 800 boys were being cared for in the Salesian oratories. Along with this, Saint John oversaw the writing, printing and distribution countless pamphlets that popularized Catholic teaching and answered the objections of anti-Catholics. Moreover, he was reported to receive supernatural guidance from the Lord, it the form of vivid dreams and visions, many of which he recounted. At times, he was able to predict the deaths of those he was close to, revealed by God, so that he might provide Last Rites. He also received a vivid vision of Hell, which he shared with all he encountered. Saint John is also remembered for working miracles, especially the multiplication of food when funds were short.
    Saint John Bosco reformed the manner in which children were educated. Rather than the punitive system which was common at the time, John enacted a preventative system which rejected corporal punishment. By tending to basic needs, educational needs, and spiritual needs, the Salesians sought to put children in an environment which reduced the likelihood to commit sin. He advocated frequent reception of the sacraments of Penance and Holy Communion. He combined catechetical training and fatherly guidance, seeking to unite the spiritual life with his boys’ work, study and play. He is remembered for saying to those he ministered to: "It is enough to know that you are young and abandoned for me to love you very much." Saint John Bosco died on January 31, 1888. His incorrupt relics are frequently taken on pilgrimage around the world, to visit the faithful. The work begun by Saint John continues today, with thousands dedicated to education youth at risk. The international society of the Salesians of Don Bosco administers over 3,000 schools, colleges, technical schools, and youth centers throughout the world (in 125 countries). All at risk children are served, regardless of religion or social inequalities. The mission of this tireless ministers is to be “signs and bearers of God’s love to the young.”
    Saint John Bosco, you reached out to children whom no one cared for despite ridicule and insults. Help us to care less about the laughter of the world and care more about the joy of the Lord. Amen
    Admirable apostle of youth, founder of religious Congregations, catechist, educator, writer, and a light that shone brightly in our time, you know that one of the greatest powers today is the power of the Press. Prompt editors to be always truthful and to work for the good of human beings, thus serving the greater glory of God. Amen. Text shared from 365 Rosaries - Image Google 

    #PopeFrancis "Let us offer this Mass for our martyrs, for those who are now suffering..." #Homily


    (Vatican Radio) The greatest strength of the Church today is in the little, persecuted Churches. That was the message of Pope Francis at the morning Mass in the chapel of the Casa Santa Marta. At the heart of the Pope’s homily were the martyrs: “Today there are more than in the first ages” – but the media says nothing about them, he continued, because it’s not news. Pope Francis invited us to remember those who suffer martyrdom.
    “Without memory there is no hope,” the Pope said, basing his homily on the reading from the Letter to the Hebrews. The first Reading of the Mass is an exhortation to remember the whole history of the people of the Lord. The liturgy in these days focuses on the eleventh chapter of Hebrews, which speaks of memory – and first of all, a “memory of docility,” the memory of the docility of so many people, beginning with Abraham, who was obedient, who went out from his own land without knowing where he was going. In particular, the section of Hebrews 11 read in today’s Mass dealt with other memories: the memory of the great works of the Lord, accomplished by Gideon, Barak, Samson, David; “so many people,” the Pope said, “who have done great things in the history of Israel.
    Today there are more martyrs than in the first ages: the media says nothing because they're not newsworthy
    There is also a third group we remember: the martyrs, “those who have suffered and given their lives, as Jesus did,” who “were stoned, tortured, killed by the sword.” The Church, in fact, is “this people of God,” “sinful but docile,” which “does great things and also bears witness to Jesus Christ, to the point of martyrdom”:
    “The martyrs are those that carry the Church forward, they are those who support the Church, who have supported her [in the past] and [who] support her today. And today there are more than in the first centuries. The media doesn’t speak of them because they're not newsworthy, but so many Christians in the world today are blessed because [they are] persecuted, insulted, incarcerated. There are so many imprisoned solely for carrying a cross or for confessing Jesus Christ! This is the glory of the Church, and our support, and also our humiliation: we who have so much, everything seems so easy for us, and if we are lacking something we complain. But let us think of these our brothers and sisters who today, in numbers greater than in the first ages, are suffering martyrdom!”
    “I cannot forget,” Pope Francis continued, “the testimony of that priest and that sister in the Cathedral of Tirana [Albania]: years and years of imprisonment, forced labour, humiliations,” for whom human rights did not exist.
    The greatest strength of the Church is the small, persecuted Churches
    Then the Pope recalled that the greatest strength of the Church of today is in the “little Churches” that are persecuted:
    “And we too – it’s also true and just – we are satisfied when we see a great ecclesial act, which has great success, Christians who demonstrate… and this is beautiful! Is this strength? Yes, it’s strength. But the greatest strength of the Church today is in the little Churches, tiny, with few people, persecuted, with their Bishops in prison. This is our glory today, this is our glory and our strength.”
    The blood of the martyrs is the seed of Christians
    “A Church without martyrs – I would dare to say – is a church without Jesus,” the Pope said in conclusion. He then invited those present to pray “for our martyrs, who suffer so much… for those Churches that are not free to express themselves: they are our hope.” And the Pope recalled that in the first ages of the Church, an ancient writer said “the blood of Christians, the blood of the martyrs, is the seed of Christians”:
    “They, with their martyrdom, their witness, with their suffering, even giving their life, offering their life, sow Christians for the future and in other Churches. Let us offer this Mass for our martyrs, for those who are now suffering, for the Churches that suffer, who do not have liberty. And let us thank the Lord for being present with the strength of the Holy Spirit in these our brothers and sisters who today are bearing witness to Him.”

    Today's Mass Readings and Video : Mon. January 30, 2017 - #Eucharist


    Monday of the Fourth Week in Ordinary Time
    Lectionary: 323


    Reading 1HEB 11:32-40

    Brothers and sisters:
    What more shall I say?
    I have not time to tell of Gideon, Barak, Samson, Jephthah,
    of David and Samuel and the prophets,
    who by faith conquered kingdoms,
    did what was righteous, obtained the promises;
    they closed the mouths of lions, put out raging fires,
    escaped the devouring sword;
    out of weakness they were made powerful, became strong in battle,
    and turned back foreign invaders.
    Women received back their dead through resurrection.
    Some were tortured and would not accept deliverance,
    in order to obtain a better resurrection.
    Others endured mockery, scourging, even chains and imprisonment.
    They were stoned, sawed in two, put to death at sword's point;
    they went about in skins of sheep or goats,
    needy, afflicted, tormented.
    The world was not worthy of them.
    They wandered about in deserts and on mountains,
    in caves and in crevices in the earth.

    Yet all these, though approved because of their faith,
    did not receive what had been promised.
    God had foreseen something better for us,
    so that without us they should not be made perfect.

    Responsorial PsalmPS 31:20, 21, 22, 23, 24

    R. (25) Let your hearts take comfort, all who hope in the Lord.
    How great is the goodness, O LORD,
    which you have in store for those who fear you,
    And which, toward those who take refuge in you,
    you show in the sight of the children of men.
    R. Let your hearts take comfort, all who hope in the Lord.
    You hide them in the shelter of your presence
    from the plottings of men;
    You screen them within your abode
    from the strife of tongues.
    R. Let your hearts take comfort, all who hope in the Lord.
    Blessed be the LORD whose wondrous mercy
    he has shown me in a fortified city.
    R. Let your hearts take comfort, all who hope in the Lord.
    Once I said in my anguish,
    "I am cut off from your sight";
    Yet you heard the sound of my pleading
    when I cried out to you.
    R. Let your hearts take comfort, all who hope in the Lord.
    Love the LORD, all you his faithful ones!
    The LORD keeps those who are constant,
    but more than requites those who act proudly.
    R. Let your hearts take comfort, all who hope in the Lord.

    AlleluiaLK 7:16

    R. Alleluia, alleluia.
    A great prophet has arisen in our midst
    and God has visited his people.
    R. Alleluia, alleluia.

    GospelMK 5:1-20

    Jesus and his disciples came to the other side of the sea,
    to the territory of the Gerasenes.
    When he got out of the boat,
    at once a man from the tombs who had an unclean spirit met him.
    The man had been dwelling among the tombs,
    and no one could restrain him any longer, even with a chain.
    In fact, he had frequently been bound with shackles and chains,
    but the chains had been pulled apart by him and the shackles smashed,
    and no one was strong enough to subdue him.
    Night and day among the tombs and on the hillsides
    he was always crying out and bruising himself with stones.
    Catching sight of Jesus from a distance,
    he ran up and prostrated himself before him,
    crying out in a loud voice,
    "What have you to do with me, Jesus, Son of the Most High God?
    I adjure you by God, do not torment me!"
    (He had been saying to him, "Unclean spirit, come out of the man!")
    He asked him, "What is your name?"
    He replied, "Legion is my name. There are many of us."
    And he pleaded earnestly with him
    not to drive them away from that territory.

    Now a large herd of swine was feeding there on the hillside.
    And they pleaded with him,
    "Send us into the swine. Let us enter them."
    And he let them, and the unclean spirits came out and entered the swine.
    The herd of about two thousand rushed down a steep bank into the sea,
    where they were drowned.
    The swineherds ran away and reported the incident in the town
    and throughout the countryside.
    And people came out to see what had happened.
    As they approached Jesus,
    they caught sight of the man who had been possessed by Legion,
    sitting there clothed and in his right mind.
    And they were seized with fear.
    Those who witnessed the incident explained to them what had happened
    to the possessed man and to the swine.
    Then they began to beg him to leave their district.
    As he was getting into the boat,
    the man who had been possessed pleaded to remain with him.
    But Jesus would not permit him but told him instead,
    "Go home to your family and announce to them
    all that the Lord in his pity has done for you."
    Then the man went off and began to proclaim in the Decapolis
    what Jesus had done for him; and all were amazed.

    Sunday, January 29, 2017

    Saint January 30 : St. Hyacintha of Mariscotti : Virgin : #3rdOrder #Franciscan


    Born:
    1585, Vignanello, Italy

    Died:
    30 January 1640, Viterbo
    Canonized:
    1807 by Pope Pius VII

    A religious of the Third Order of St. Francis and foundress of the Sacconi; born 1585 of a noble family at Vignanello, near Viterbo in Italy; died 30 January, 1640, at Viterbo; feast, 30 January; in Rome, 6 February (Diarium Romanum). Her parents were Marc' Antonio Mariscotti (Marius Scotus) and Ottavia Orsini. At Baptism she received the name Clarice and in early youth was remarkable for piety, but, as she grew older, she became frivolous, and showed a worldly disposition, which not even the almost miraculous saving of her life at the age of seventeen could change; neither was her frivolity checked by her education at the Convent of St. Bernardine at Viterbo, where an older sister had taken the veil. At the age of twenty she set her heart upon marriage with the Marquess Cassizucchi, but was passed by in favour of a younger sister. She was sadly disappointed, became morose, and at last joined the community at St. Bernardine, receiving the name Hyacintha. But, as she told her father, she did this only to hide her chagrin and not to give up the luxuries of the world; and she asked him to furnish her apartments with every comfort. She kept her own kitchen, wore a habit of the finest material, received and paid visits at pleasure.
    For ten years she continued this kind of life, so contrary to the spirit of her vows and such a source of scandal to the community. By the special protection of God, she retained a lively faith, was regular in her devotions, remained pure, always showed a great respect for the mysteries of religion, and had a tender devotion to the Blessed Virgin. At length she was touched by God's grace, and the earnest exhortations of her confessor at the time of serious illness made her see the folly of the past and brought about a complete change in her life. She made a public confession of her faults in the refectory, discarded her costly garments, wore an old habit, went barefoot, frequently fasted on bread and water, chastised her body by vigils and severe scourging, and practised mortifications to such an extent that the decree of canonization considers the preservation of her life a continued miracle. She increased her devotion to the Mother of God, to the Holy Infant Jesus, to the Blessed Eucharist, and to the sufferings of Christ. She worked numerous miracles, had the gifts of prophecy and of discerning the secret thoughts of others. She was also favoured by heavenly ecstacies and raptures. During an epidemic that raged in Viterbo she showed heroic charity in nursing the sick. She established two confraternities, whose members were called Oblates of Mary or Sacconi. One of these, similar to our Society of St. Vincent de Paul, gathered alms for the convalescent, for the poor who were ashamed to beg, and for the care of prisoners; the other procured homes for the aged. Though now leading a life so pure and holy, Hyacintha always conceived the greatest contempt for herself. At her death great sorrow was felt at Viterbo and crowds flocked to her funeral. She was beatified by Pope Benedict XIII in 1726, and canonized 14 May, 1807, by Pius VII.

    (Taken from Catholic Encyclopedia)
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