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Sunday, September 25, 2016

Catholic News World : Sun. September 25, 2016 - SHARE

2016

#PopeFrancis “I assure my prayer for the dear Mexican people, that the violence..." #Angelus

(Vatican Radio) Pope Francis offered prayers for slain Mexican priests on Sunday, and put his support behind the ongoing pro-family and pro-life efforts of the Mexican Bishops.
Speaking with the faithful gathered in St. Peter’s Square on Sunday, following Mass to mark the Jubilee of Catechists celebrated as part of the Extraordinary Jubilee Year of Mercy, and ahead of the traditional noonday Angelus prayer, Pope Francis said, “I am very happy to associate myself with the Bishops of Mexico, in supporting the commitment of the Church and of civil society in favor of the family and of life, which in this time require special pastoral and cultural attention in all the world.”
The Holy Father went on to say, “I assure my prayer for the dear Mexican people, that the violence, which has in recent days reached even several priests, might cease.”
Two priests were abducted and murdered in Poza Rica, Veracruz state.
Their abductions and murders took place at a time in which Church leaders have been calling for increased protection for clergy, as the Church in Mexico advocates in defence of traditional marrigage while the administration of President Enrique Peña Nieto pushes for a change in the law to allow legal recognition of same-sex unions as marriages.
14 priests have been killed since Peña Nieto took office in 2012, along with scores of thousands of kidnappings and homicides since that same year, most of which are related to the ongoing violence between rival drug cartels in the country.

"Mercy in the Year of Mercy" Conference in Toronto - by Fellowship of Catholic #Scholars




"Mercy in the Year of Mercy" Conference in Toronto - by Fellowship of Catholic #Scholars 
Registration: $20
Location : 70 St. Mary St., Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Friday Sept. 30 6pm - 10pm
Saturday October 1, 2016 -  8am - 5pm'
Register with Dr. Patrick Redmond,pmredmond@sympatico.ca OR
Professor Robert Berard,  robert.berard@msvu.ca

Friday

6 PM Registration

6:45 Opening prayer - vespers

7:00 Flaman, Dr. Paul “Mercy: A Comparison of its Treatment by Popes John

Paul II, Benedict XVI and Francis”

8:30 movie on Divine Mercy – shown at World Youth Day 2016

9:30 Wine and cheese reception

Saturday

8:00 Mass

8:30 Coffee

9:00 Goulding, Sr. Dr. Gill “Configured to Christ: the Dynamic Impact of

Mercy on the Mission of the Church”

10:00 Davis, Fr. Ricardo “Mercy and confession”

10:45 Coffee

11:00 Westen, Miriam “Pope Benedict XVI and biblical manifestations of God’s

merciful love in Deus Caritas Est, Sacramentum Caritatis, and Caritatis in

Veritate”

12:00 Lunch

1:00 Donlevy, Dr. Kent & Fr. Penna “The Right to Die: Mercy and Freedom of

Conscience in Canada”

2:30 Bobrow, Teresa “Mercy in the Ladder of Divine Ascent by St. John

Climacus”

3:30 coffee

4:00 Nicholson, Scott “Haram (the Ban) and Divine


#PopeFrancis “Jesus truly loves you, just as you are." FULL TEXT #Homily and Mass Video

(Vatican Radio) Pope Francis celebrated Mass to mark the Jubilee of Catechists on Sunday – the 26th Sunday in Ordinary Time and the Jubilee of Catechists in the Extraordinary Jubilee Year of Mercy.
Please find the full text of Pope Francis’ homily, in its official English translation, below
********************************************************
In the second reading the Apostle Paul offers to Timothy, but also to us, some advice which is close to his heart.  Among other things, he charges him “to keep the commandment unstained and free from reproach” (1 Tim 6:14).  He speaks simply of a commandment.  It seems that he wants to keep our attention fixed firmly on what is essential for our faith.  Saint Paul, indeed, is not suggesting all sorts of different points, but is emphasizing the core of the faith.  This centre around which everything revolves, this beating heart which gives life to everything is the Paschal proclamation, the first proclamation: the Lord Jesus is risen, the Lord Jesus loves you, and he has given his life for you; risen and alive, he is close to you and waits for you every day.  We must never forget this.  On this Jubilee for Catechists, we are being asked not to tire of keeping the key message of the faith front and centre: the Lord is risen.  Nothing is more important;  nothing is clearer or more relevant than this.  Everything in the faith becomes beautiful when linked to this centrepiece, if it is saturated by the Paschal proclamation.  If it remains in isolation, however, it loses its sense and force.  We are called always to live out and proclaim the newness of the Lord’s love: “Jesus truly loves you, just as you are.  Give him space: in spite of the disappointments and wounds in your life, give him the chance to love you.  He will not disappoint you”.
The commandment which Saint Paul is speaking of makes us think also of Jesus’ new commandment: “that you love one another as I have loved you” (Jn 15:12).  It is by loving that the God-who-is-Love is proclaimed to the world: not by the power of convincing, never by imposing the truth, no less by growing fixated on some religious or moral obligation.  God is proclaimed through the encounter between persons, with care for their history and their journey.  Because the Lord is not an idea, but a living person: his message is passed on through simple and authentic testimony, by listening and welcoming, with joy which radiates outward.  We do not speak convincingly about Jesus when we are sad; nor do we transmit God’s beauty merely with beautiful homilies.  The God of hope is proclaimed by living out the Gospel of love in the present moment, without being afraid of testifying to it, even in new ways.
This Sunday’s Gospel helps us understand what it means to love, and more than anything how to avoid certain risks.  In the parable there is a rich man who does not notice Lazarus, a poor man who was “at his gate” (Lk 16:20).  This rich man, in fact, does not do evil towards anyone; nothing says that he is a bad man.  But he has a sickness much greater than Lazarus’, who was “full of sores” (ibid.): this rich man suffers from terrible blindness, because he is not able to look beyond his world, made of banquets and fine clothing.  He cannot see beyond the door of his house to where Lazarus lies, because what is happening outside does not interest him.  He does not see with his eyes, because he cannot feel with his heart.  For into it a worldliness has entered which anaesthetizes the soul.  This worldliness is like a “black hole” that swallows up what is good, which extinguishes love, because it consumes everything in its very self.  And so here a person sees only outward appearances, no longer noticing others because one has become indifferent to everyone.  The one who suffers from grave blindness often takes on “squinting” behaviour: he looks with adulation at famous people, of high rank, admired by the world, yet turns his gaze away from the many Lazaruses of today, from the poor, from the suffering who are the Lord’s beloved.
But the Lord looks at those who are neglected and discarded by the world.  Lazarus is the only one named in all of Jesus’ parables.  His name means “God helps”.  God does not forget him; he will welcome him to the banquet in his kingdom, together with Abram, in communion with all who suffer.  The rich man in the parable, on the other hand, does not even have a name; his life passes by forgotten, because whoever lives for himself does not write history.  And a Christian must write history!  He or she must go out from themselves, to write history! But whoever lives for themselves cannot write history.  Today’s callousness causes chasms to be dug that can never be crossed.  And we have fallen, at this time, into the sickness of indifference, selfishness and worldliness.
There is another detail in the parable, a contrast.  The opulent life of this nameless man is described as being ostentatious: everything about him concerns needs and rights.  Even when he is dead he insists on being helped and demands what is to his benefit.  Lazarus’ poverty, however, is articulated with great dignity: from his mouth no complaints or protests or scornful words issue.  This is a valuable teaching: as servants of the word of Jesus we have been called not to parade our appearances and not to seek for glory; nor can we be sad or full of complaints.  We are not prophets of gloom who take delight in unearthing dangers or deviations; we are not people who become ensconced in our own surroundings, handing out bitter judgments on our society, on the Church, on everything and everyone, polluting the world with our negativity.  Pitiful scepticism does not belong to whoever is close to the word of God. 
Whoever proclaims the hope of Jesus carries joy and sees a great distance; such persons have the horizon open before them; there is no wall closing them in; they see a great distance because they know how to see beyond evil and beyond their problems.  At the same time, they see clearly from up close, because they are attentive to their neighbour and to their neighbour’s needs.  The Lord is asking this of us today: before all the Lazaruses whom we see, we are called to be disturbed, to find ways of meeting and helping, without always delegating to others or saying: “I will help you tomorrow; I have no time today, I’ll help you tomorrow”.  This is a sin.  The time taken to help others is time given to Jesus; it is love that remains: it is our treasure in heaven, which we earn here on earth.
And so, dear catechists, dear brothers and sisters, may the Lord give us the grace to be renewed every day by the joy of the first proclamation to us: Jesus died and is risen, Jesus loves us personally!  May he give us the strength to live and proclaim the commandment of love, overcoming blindness of appearances, and worldly sadness.  May he make us sensitive to the poor, who are not an afterthought in the Gospel but an important page, always open before all.

Saturday, September 24, 2016

Saint September 25 : St. Finbarr - #Bishop of #Ireland

St. Finbarr
BISHOP
Feast: September 25
Information:
Feast Day:
September 25
Born:
550 AD, near Bandon, Ireland
Died:
620 AD, Cloyne, County Cork, Ireland
Patron of:
Cork
Bishop and patron of Cork, born near Bandon, about 550, died at Cloyne, 25 September, 623, was son of Amergin. He evangelized Gowran, Coolcashin, and Aghaboe, and founded a school at Eirce. For some years he dwelt in a hermitage at Gougane Barra, where a beautiful replica of Cormac's chapel has recently been erected in his honour. Finbarr was buried in the cathedral he built where Cork city now stands. He was specially honoured also at Dornoch and Barra, in Scotland. There are five Irish saints of this name.

Sunday Mass Online : Sun. September 25, 2016 - 26th Ord. Time - C - Readings and Video

Twenty-sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time
Lectionary: 138


Reading 1AM 6:1A, 4-7

Thus says the LORD the God of hosts:
Woe to the complacent in Zion!
Lying upon beds of ivory,
stretched comfortably on their couches,
they eat lambs taken from the flock,
and calves from the stall!
Improvising to the music of the harp,
like David, they devise their own accompaniment.
They drink wine from bowls
and anoint themselves with the best oils;
yet they are not made ill by the collapse of Joseph!
Therefore, now they shall be the first to go into exile,
and their wanton revelry shall be done away with.

Responsorial PsalmPS 146:7, 8-9, 9-10

R. (1b) Praise the Lord, my soul!
or:
R. Alleluia.
Blessed he who keeps faith forever,
secures justice for the oppressed,
gives food to the hungry.
The LORD sets captives free.
R. Praise the Lord, my soul!
or:
R. Alleluia.
The LORD gives sight to the blind.
The LORD raises up those who were bowed down;
the LORD loves the just.
The LORD protects strangers.
R. Praise the Lord, my soul!
or:
R. Alleluia.
The fatherless and the widow he sustains,
but the way of the wicked he thwarts.
The LORD shall reign forever;
your God, O Zion, through all generations. Alleluia.
R. Praise the Lord, my soul!
or:
R. Alleluia.

Reading 21 TM 6:11-16

But you, man of God, pursue righteousness,
devotion, faith, love, patience, and gentleness.
Compete well for the faith.
Lay hold of eternal life, to which you were called
when you made the noble confession in the presence of many witnesses.
I charge you before God, who gives life to all things,
and before Christ Jesus,
who gave testimony under Pontius Pilate for the noble confession,
to keep the commandment without stain or reproach
until the appearance of our Lord Jesus Christ
that the blessed and only ruler
will make manifest at the proper time,
the King of kings and Lord of lords,
who alone has immortality, who dwells in unapproachable light,
and whom no human being has seen or can see.
To him be honor and eternal power. Amen.

AlleluiaCF. 2 COR 8:9

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
Though our Lord Jesus Christ was rich, he became poor,
so that by his poverty you might become rich.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

GospelLK 16:19-31

Jesus said to the Pharisees:
“There was a rich man who dressed in purple garments and fine linen
and dined sumptuously each day.
And lying at his door was a poor man named Lazarus, covered with sores,
who would gladly have eaten his fill of the scraps
that fell from the rich man's table.
Dogs even used to come and lick his sores.
When the poor man died,
he was carried away by angels to the bosom of Abraham.
The rich man also died and was buried,
and from the netherworld, where he was in torment,
he raised his eyes and saw Abraham far off
and Lazarus at his side.
And he cried out, 'Father Abraham, have pity on me.
Send Lazarus to dip the tip of his finger in water and cool my tongue,
for I am suffering torment in these flames.'
Abraham replied,
‘My child, remember that you received
what was good during your lifetime
while Lazarus likewise received what was bad;
but now he is comforted here, whereas you are tormented.
Moreover, between us and you a great chasm is established
to prevent anyone from crossing who might wish to go
from our side to yours or from your side to ours.’
He said, ‘Then I beg you, father,
send him to my father’s house, for I have five brothers,
so that he may warn them,
lest they too come to this place of torment.'
But Abraham replied, ‘They have Moses and the prophets.
Let them listen to them.’
He said, ‘Oh no, father Abraham,
but if someone from the dead goes to them, they will repent.’
Then Abraham said, ‘If they will not listen to Moses and the prophets,
neither will they be persuaded if someone should rise from the dead.’”

#PopeFrancis "May the certainty of eternal life, which also belongs to believers of other religions..." FULL Video - to Nice Victims

(Vatican Radio) Pope Francis on Saturday received family members of the victims of the Bastille Day terror attacks in Nice, renewing his condolences andpromises of prayer for their healing and for the souls of their loved-ones.
“It is with profound emotion that I meet you,” said Pope Francis, “who suffer in body or in soul because, one festive evening, violence blindly struck you – you, or one of your dear ones – without regard for origin or religion.” The Holy Father went on to say, “I desire to share your pain, a pain that becomes even stronger when I think of the children, even entire families, whose lives have been so suddenly and so dramatically torn away: to each of you I assure my compassion, my closeness and my prayer.”
“Dear families,” he continued in his address to the roughly 1 thousand people gathered in the Paul VI Hall for the occasion, “I invoke our Heavenly Father, the Father of all, that He might welcome your loved ones, that they might soon find rest and the joy of eternal life.”
“For us Christians,” the Pope went on to say, “the foundation of hope is Jesus Christ crucified and risen. The Apostle Paul assures him there: ‘If we died with Christ, we believe that we shall also live with him, knowing that Christ, risen from the dead, dies no more; death no longer has power over Him. (Rom 6:8-9)’ May the certainty of eternal life, which also belongs to believers of other religions, be for you consolation in life, and constitute a powerful motive for perseverance to continue with courage on your way here on earth.”
Pope Francis went on to offer promises of prayer for all those injured in the attack, whether in body or in spirit, especially remembering those who could not make the trip to Rome because of their injuries, some of whom are still in hospital.
“The Church remains close to you and accompanies you with immense compassion, he said. “With her presence next to you in moments such as these, which are so weighty to face, she asks the Lord to come to your aid and to put in your hearts sentiments of peace and brotherhood.”
Then Pope Francis recalled how the drama that unfolded in Nice has moved people from every quarter to significant gestures of solidarity, and thanked all those, who acted as first responders and who continue to be devoted even today to serving and lending support to all the families affected.
“I think of course the Catholic community and to their bishop, André Marceau, but also to the care services and volunteers, in particular the Alpes-Maritimes Fraternité association, present here, which gathers representatives of all religious confessions,” he said, adding, “and this is a very nice sign of hope.”
The Holy Father went on to say he is relieved to know that interreligious relations in Nice have not been allowed to deteriorate in the wake of the attack. “I am glad to see that among you interreligious relations are very much alive, and this can only help to alleviate the hurt of these dramatic events,” he said.
“In fact,” Pope Francis continued, “establishing a sincere dialogue and fraternal relations among all, particularly among those who confess a God who is one and merciful, is an urgent priority that those in leadership positions both political and religious should seek to encourage, and which everyone is called to realize in his own space.”
Then the Holy Father went on to warn against giving in to temptations to turn inward, or to answer hatred with hatred and violence, saying that when such temptations are great, authentic conversion of heart is necessary. “This,” he said, “is the message that the Gospel of Jesus addresses to all of us: you can respond to the assaults of the devil only with the works of God that are forgiveness, love and respect for your neighbor, even if he is different.”

Today's Mass Readings and Video : Sat. September 24, 2016


Saturday of the Twenty-fifth Week in Ordinary Time
Lectionary: 454


Reading 1ECCL 11:9—12:8

Rejoice, O young man, while you are young
and let your heart be glad in the days of your youth.
Follow the ways of your heart,
the vision of your eyes;
Yet understand that as regards all this
God will bring you to judgment.
Ward off grief from your heart
and put away trouble from your presence,
though the dawn of youth is fleeting.

Remember your Creator in the days of your youth,
before the evil days come
And the years approach of which you will say,
I have no pleasure in them;
Before the sun is darkened,
and the light, and the moon, and the stars,
while the clouds return after the rain;
When the guardians of the house tremble,
and the strong men are bent,
And the grinders are idle because they are few,
and they who look through the windows grow blind;
When the doors to the street are shut,
and the sound of the mill is low;
When one waits for the chirp of a bird,
but all the daughters of song are suppressed;
And one fears heights,
and perils in the street;
When the almond tree blooms,
and the locust grows sluggish
and the caper berry is without effect,
Because man goes to his lasting home,
and mourners go about the streets;
Before the silver cord is snapped
and the golden bowl is broken,
And the pitcher is shattered at the spring,
and the broken pulley falls into the well,
And the dust returns to the earth as it once was,
and the life breath returns to God who gave it.

Vanity of vanities, says Qoheleth,
all things are vanity!

Responsorial PsalmPS 90:3-4, 5-6, 12-13, 14 AND 17

R. (1) In every age, O Lord, you have been our refuge.
You turn man back to dust,
saying, “Return, O children of men.”
For a thousand years in your sight
are as yesterday, now that it is past,
or as a watch of the night.
R. In every age, O Lord, you have been our refuge.
You make an end of them in their sleep;
the next morning they are like the changing grass,
Which at dawn springs up anew,
but by evening wilts and fades.
R. In every age, O Lord, you have been our refuge.
Teach us to number our days aright,
that we may gain wisdom of heart.
Return, O LORD! How long?
Have pity on your servants!
R. In every age, O Lord, you have been our refuge.
Fill us at daybreak with your kindness,
that we may shout for joy and gladness all our days.
And may the gracious care of the Lord our God be ours;
prosper the work of our hands for us!
Prosper the work of our hands!
R. In every age, O Lord, you have been our refuge.

AlleluiaSEE 2 TM 1:10

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
Our Savior Christ Jesus destroyed death
and brought life to light through the Gospel.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

GospelLK 9:43B-45

While they were all amazed at his every deed,
Jesus said to his disciples,
“Pay attention to what I am telling you.
The Son of Man is to be handed over to men.”
But they did not understand this saying;
its meaning was hidden from them
so that they should not understand it,
and they were afraid to ask him about this saying.

Friday, September 23, 2016

Saint September 24 : St. Pacific of San Severino - #Franciscan

Born at San Severino, in the March of Ancona, 1 March, 1653; died there 24 September, 1721; the son of Antonio M. Divini and Mariangela Bruni. His parents died soon after his confirmation when three years old; he suffered many hardships until in December, 1670, he took the Franciscan habit in the Order of the Reformati, at Forano, in the March of Ancona, and was ordained on 4 June, 1678, subsequently becoming Lector or Professor of Philosophy (1680-83) for the younger members of the order, after which, for five or six years, he laboured as a missionary among the people of the surrounding country. He then suffered lameness, deafness, and blindness for nearly twenty-nine years. Unable to give missions, he cultivated more the contemplative life. He bore his ills with angelic patience, worked several miracles, and was favoured by God with ecstasies. Though a constant sufferer, he held the post of guardian in the monastery of Maria delle Grazie in San Severino (1692-3), where he died. His cause for beatification was begun in 1740; he was beatified by Pius VI, 4 August, 1786, and solemnly canonized by Gregory XVI, 26 May, 1839. His feast is celebrated on 24 September. Text from the Catholic Encyclopedia

Free Catholic Movie : Padre Pio Movie with English Subtitles - #PadrePio



Padre Pio (2000) TV Movie - 202 min - Biography | Drama - 17 April 2000 (Italy)
The poor Italian peasant boy Francesco already has visions of Jesus and Mary as a child, but the Devil visits him too. He, Francesco, is quite certain that he will become a priest.
 Director: Carlo Carlei Writers: Renzo Allegri (book), Carlo Carlei,
Stars: Sergio Castellitto, Jürgen Prochnow, Lorenza Indovina
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