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Tuesday, June 28, 2016

Catholic News World : Tuesday June 28, 2016 - SHARE

2016

Wow #Bishop tries out Homelessness for 36 hours - #Homeless to Raise Funds for Care Group - SHARE

Saskatoon bishop tries out homelessness for 36 hours in charity challenge. Bishop Donald J. Bolen of Saskatoon and nine other local leaders participated. The bishop, who lives in an apartment in central Saskatoon, said the brief experience of living on the streets opened his eyes. “The most powerful experience was the vulnerability of the situations that we were in,” Bishop Bolen said. This event took place from June 17-18 and was called Sanctum Survivor raising funds for Sanctum Care Group. This group funds hospice and transitional care for homeless people and individuals struggling with the virus that causes AIDS. The participants slept in a city park during a 36-hour homelessness challenge. “There are a whole lot of things in my neighborhood that I knew were there and I acknowledged their existence, but I got to see firsthand a lot more of the hurt and the pain in the neighborhood, as well as the joy, and the simple relationships that exist,” the Bishop said. The participants were also given a list of tasks to complete during their day-and-a-half of homelessness to show that even simple undertakings can become difficult for those with limited resources. “The slowing down of pace and being present in the neighborhood was a very revealing thing,” Bishop Bolen explained. “Once you go slow and you go vulnerably and you are willing to take on each situation and enter into relationship, enter into dialogue, there is a lot of take home in that.” “One of our challenges was to buy a meal, and therefore we had to do the panhandling to get the money,” Bolen described."It was an experience of the invisibility of the homeless or the poor and vulnerable.” Bishop Donald J. Bolen said. The 10 participants raised $135,000 Canadian ($105,480 U.S.) for Sanctum Care Group. Edited from CNS

Happy 65th Anniversary to the Priesthood of Benedict XVI - Celebration with Pope Francis at Vatican

























(Vatican Radio) Pope Francis on Tuesday hosted a celebration for the 65th anniversary of the priestly ordination of his predecessor Benedict, the pope emeritus. Joseph Ratzinger, who took the name Benedict XVI when he was elected to the papacy in 2005, attended the celebration in the Sala Clementina within the Apostolic Palace. More than thirty cardinals were also present, as well as a number of other invited guests.
The event began with music from the Sistine Choir and a speech by Pope Francis. In his remarks, the Supreme Pontiff recalled St Peter’s response to Jesus’ question, “Do you love me?” “Lord, you know that I love you,” answered the first Pope. And this, the current Pope said, “is the note that has dominated a life spent entirely in the service of the priesthood and of the true theology”.
Pope Francis said that Benedict continues to serve the Church, “not ceasing to truly contribute to her growth with strength and wisdom.” “And you do this,” he said, “from that little Mater Ecclesiae Monastery in the Vatican, that is shown in that way to be anything but that forgotten little corner to which today’s culture of waste tends to relegate people when, with age, their strength diminishes.” He spoke, too, about the “Franciscan” dimension of the monastery, which recalls the Portiuncula, the “little portion” where St Francis founded his order, and laid down his life. Divine Providence, he said, “has willed that you, dear Brother, should reach a place one could truly call ‘Franciscan’, from which emanates a tranquillity, a peace, a strength, a confidence, a maturity, a faith, a dedication, and a fidelity that does so much good for me, and gives strength to me and to the whole Church.”
At the conclusion of his remarks, Pope Francis offered best wishes to Pope emeritus Benedict on behalf of himself and of the whole Church, with the prayer for Benedict, “That you, Holiness, might continue to feel the hand of the merciful God who supports you; that you might continue to experience and witness to us the love of God; that, with Peter and Paul, you might continue to rejoice with great joy as you journey toward the goal of the faith.”
Later, after more music and speeches by Cardinals Gerhard Müller and Angelo Sodano – respectively Prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith and Dean of the College of Cardinals – Benedict offered words of thanks to all his well-wishers, and in a particular way to Pope Francis. Speaking to the Holy Father, Benedict said, “Your kindness, from the first moment of the election, in every moment of my life here, strikes me, is a source of real inspiration for me. More than in the Vatican Gardens, with their beauty, your goodness is the place where I dwell: I feel protected.”
The Pope emeritus also reflected on the concept of “thanksgiving,” reflecting on a word written, in Greek, on a remembrance card from his first Mass. That word, he said, suggests “not only human thanksgiving, but naturally hints at the more profound word that is hidden, which appears in the liturgy, in the Scriptures,” and in the words of consecration. The Greek word “eucharistomen,” he said, “brings us back to that reality of thanksgiving, to that new dimension that Christ has given it. He has transformed into thanksgiving, and so into blessing, the Cross, suffering, all the evil of the world. And thus He has fundamentally transubstantiated life and the world, and has given us, and gives us today the Bread of true life, which overcomes the world thanks to the strength of his love.”

#PopeFrancis "... the experience of God’s mercy is the bond uniting us means.." #Ecumenical Patriarchate - FULL TEXT

(Vatican Radio)  Pope Francis addressed a delegation from the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople, with whom he held a private audience on Tuesday in the Vatican, calling the mercy of God ‘the bond uniting us’.
The delegation came to Rome following the conclusion of the week-long Pan-Orthodox Council, which was held on the Greek island of Crete.
The mercy of God is the bond uniting the Churches, a fruit of the Holy Spirit which produces communion but never uniformity. That was at the heart of Pope Francis’ message to the delegation from the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople in a private audience.
Recalling that June 29th marks the Feast of St. Peter and Paul, the Holy Father said that the Church in every age has proclaimed their same message of divine mercy.
“Saints Peter and Paul both experienced great sin and, subsequently, the power of God’s mercy. As a result of this experience, Peter, who had denied his Master, and Paul, who persecuted the nascent Church, became tireless evangelizers and fearless witnesses to the salvation offered by God in Christ to every man and woman.”
The Pope noted that from the earliest centuries there have been many differences between the Churches of Rome and Constantinople, including liturgical practices, ecclesiastical discipline, and “in the manner of formulating the one revealed truth”.
“Acknowledging that the experience of God’s mercy is the bond uniting us means that we must increasingly make mercy the criterion and measure of our relationship. If, as Catholics and Orthodox, we wish to proclaim together the marvels of God’s mercy to the whole world, we cannot continue to harbour sentiments and attitudes of rivalry, mistrust and rancour. For divine mercy frees us of the burden of past conflicts and lets us be open to the future to which the Spirit is guiding us.”
“One contribution to surmounting the obstacles to our recovery of the unity we shared in the first millennium – a unity that was never uniformity but always communion with respect for legitimate diversities – is provided by theological dialogue.”
Pope Francis went on to recall the “powerful spiritual and human closeness” he experienced on his recent visit to the Greek island of Lesbos in the accompaniment of Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople, Bartholomew I, and Ieronymos II, Archbishop of Athens and All Greece.
“Seeing the despair on the faces of men, women and children uncertain of their future, listening helplessly as they related their experiences, and praying on the shore of the sea that has claimed the lives of so many innocent persons, was a tremendously moving experience. It made clear how much still needs to be done to ensure dignity and justice for so many of our brothers and sisters.”
The Holy Father concluded his remarks with assurances to the delegation of his prayers for the recently-concluded Pan-Orthodox Council.
“Together with many of our Catholic brothers and sisters and other Christians, I accompanied with my prayers the immediate preparation and the unfolding of the Council. […] May the Holy Spirit bring forth from this event abundant fruits for the good of the Church.”
Below, please find the official English translation of the Pope's address:
28 June 2016
With joy and affection I offer you a heartfelt welcome on the occasion of the Solemnity of the Holy Patrons of the Church of Rome, the Apostles Peter and Paul.  I thank you for your presence and I ask you to convey my deep gratitude to His Holiness Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew and to the Holy Synod for sending a distinguished Delegation to share our joy on this Solemnity.
This year’s meeting takes place in the context of the Catholic Church’s celebration of the Extraordinary Jubilee of Mercy.  I desired to proclaim the Jubilee as a favourable time for contemplating the mystery of the Father’s infinite love revealed in Christ, and for strengthening and rendering more effective our witness to this mystery (cf. Bull Misericordiae Vultus, 2-3).  In their own lives and in rather different ways, Saints Peter and Paul both experienced great sin and, subsequently, the power of God’s mercy.  As a result of this experience, Peter, who had denied his Master, and Paul, who persecuted the nascent Church, became tireless evangelizers and fearless witnesses to the salvation offered by God in Christ to every man and woman.  Following the example of the Apostles Peter and Paul, and the other Apostles, the Church, made up of sinners redeemed through Baptism, has continued in every age to proclaim that same message of divine mercy.
In celebrating the Solemnity of the Apostles, we recall to mind the experience of forgiveness and grace uniting all those who believe in Christ.  From the earliest centuries, there have been many differences between the Church of Rome and the Church of Constantinople, in the liturgical sphere, in ecclesiastical discipline and also in the manner of formulating the one revealed truth.  However, beyond the concrete shapes that our Churches have taken on over time, there has always been the same experience of God’s infinite love for our smallness and frailty, and the same calling to bear witness to this love before the world.  Acknowledging that the experience of God’s mercy is the bond uniting us means that we must increasingly make mercy the criterion and measure of our relationship.  If, as Catholics and Orthodox, we wish to proclaim together the marvels of God’s mercy to the whole world, we cannot continue to harbour sentiments and attitudes of rivalry, mistrust and rancour.  For divine mercy frees us of the burden of past conflicts and lets us be open to the future to which the Spirit is guiding us.
One contribution to surmounting the obstacles to our recovery of the unity we shared in the first millennium – a unity that was never uniformity but always communion with respect for legitimate diversities – is provided by theological dialogue.  Dear Metropolitan Methodius, I wish to express to you my appreciation for the fruitful work accomplished by the North American Orthodox-Catholic Theological Consultation of which Your Eminence is Co-President.  Instituted more than fifty years ago, this Consultation has proposed significant reflections on central theological issues for our Churches, thus fostering the development of excellent relations between Catholics and Orthodox on that continent.  In this regard, I rejoice that this coming September the Joint International Commission for Theological Dialogue between the Catholic Church and the Orthodox Church will meet once again.  The task of this Commission is indeed precious; let us pray the Lord for the fruitfulness of its work.  I also offer a special remembrance in my prayers for you, dear Archbishop Job, appointed the Orthodox Co-President of the Commission, and I express my profound gratitude to Metropolitan Ioannis of Pergamum, who has long carried out this delicate task with dedication and competence.
I thank the Lord that this past April I was able to meet my beloved brother Bartholomew when, together with the Archbishop of Athens and of All Greece, His Beatitude Ieronymos II, we visited the Isle of Lesvos, to be with the refugees and migrants.  Seeing the despair on the faces of men, women and children uncertain of their future, listening helplessly as they related their experiences, and praying on the shore of the sea that has claimed the lives of so many innocent persons, was a tremendously moving experience.  It made clear how much still needs to be done to ensure dignity and justice for so many of our brothers and sisters.  A great consolation in that sad experience was the powerful spiritual and human closeness that I shared with Patriarch Bartholomew and Archbishop Ieronymos.  Led by the Holy Spirit, we are coming to realize ever more clearly that we, Catholics and Orthodox, have a shared responsibility towards those in need, based on our obedience to the one Gospel of Jesus Christ our Lord.  Taking up this task together is a duty linked to the very credibility of our Christian identity.  Consequently, I encourage every form of cooperation between Catholics and Orthodox in concrete undertakings in service to suffering humanity. 
Your Eminence, dear brothers, the celebration of the Pan-Orthodox Council has recently concluded at Crete.  Together with many of our Catholic brothers and sisters, and other Christians, I accompanied with my prayers the immediate preparation and the unfolding of the Council.  Cardinal Koch and Bishop Farrell, who participated in the historic event as fraternal observers of the Catholic Church, have just returned from Crete; they will be able to inform me about the Council and the resolutions it adopted.  May the Holy Spirit bring forth from this event abundant fruits for the good of the Church. 
At the conclusion of this meeting, I renew my heartfelt gratitude to you for your presence and I assure you of my fraternal love and respect for the Ecumenical Patriarchate.  Let us entrust our prayers and intentions to the intercession of the Most Holy Virgin Mary, Saints Peter and Paul, and Saint Andrew, the brother of Peter.  And I ask you, please, to pray for me and for my ministry.

(Devin Sean Watkins)

    Today's Mass Readings and Video : Tues. June 28, 2016

    Memorial of Saint Irenaeus, Bishop and Martyr
    Lectionary: 378


    Reading 1AM 3:1-8; 4:11-12

    Hear this word, O children of Israel, that the LORD pronounces over you,
    over the whole family that I brought up from the land of Egypt:

    You alone have I favored,
    more than all the families of the earth;
    Therefore I will punish you
    for all your crimes.

    Do two walk together
    unless they have agreed?
    Does a lion roar in the forest
    when it has no prey?
    Does a young lion cry out from its den
    unless it has seized something?
    Is a bird brought to earth by a snare
    when there is no lure for it?
    Does a snare spring up from the ground
    without catching anything?
    If the trumpet sounds in a city,
    will the people not be frightened?
    If evil befalls a city,
    has not the LORD caused it?
    Indeed, the Lord GOD does nothing
    without revealing his plan
    to his servants, the prophets.

    The lion roars—
    who will not be afraid!
    The Lord GOD speaks—
    who will not prophesy!

    I brought upon you such upheaval
    as when God overthrew Sodom and Gomorrah:
    you were like a brand plucked from the fire;
    Yet you returned not to me,
    says the LORD.

    So now I will deal with you in my own way, O Israel!
    and since I will deal thus with you,
    prepare to meet your God, O Israel.

    Responsorial PsalmPS 5:4B-6A, 6B-7, 8

    R. (9a) Lead me in your justice, Lord.
    At dawn I bring my plea expectantly before you.
    For you, O God, delight not in wickedness;
    no evil man remains with you;
    the arrogant may not stand in your sight.
    R. Lead me in your justice, Lord.
    You hate all evildoers;
    you destroy all who speak falsehood;
    The bloodthirsty and the deceitful
    the LORD abhors.
    R. Lead me in your justice, Lord.
    But I, because of your abundant mercy,
    will enter your house;
    I will worship at your holy temple
    in fear of you, O LORD.
    R. Lead me in your justice, Lord.

    AlleluiaPS 130:5

    R. Alleluia, alleluia.
    I trust in the LORD;
    my soul trusts in his word.
    R. Alleluia, alleluia.

    GospelMT 8:23-27

    As Jesus got into a boat, his disciples followed him.
    Suddenly a violent storm came up on the sea,
    so that the boat was being swamped by waves;
    but he was asleep.
    They came and woke him, saying,
    “Lord, save us! We are perishing!”
    He said to them, “Why are you terrified, O you of little faith?”
    Then he got up, rebuked the winds and the sea,
    and there was great calm.
    The men were amazed and said, “What sort of man is this,
    whom even the winds and the sea obey?”

    Saint June 28 : St. Irenaeus of Lyons : #Bishop and Father of the #Church

    Bishop of Lyons, and Father of the Church.
    Feast Day:
    June 28
    Born:
    130 in Asia Minor
    Died:
    203 in Lyons, France
    Information as to his life is scarce, and in some measure inexact. He was born in Proconsular Asia, or at least in some province bordering thereon, in the first half of the second century; the exact date is controverted, between the years 115 and 125, according to some, or, according to others, between 130 and 142. It is certain that, while still very young, Irenaeus had seen and heard the holy Bishop Polycarp (d. 155) at Smyrna. During the persecution of Marcus Aurelius, Irenaeus was a priest of the Church of Lyons. The clergy of that city, many of whom were suffering imprisonment for the Faith, sent him (177 or 178) to Rome with a letter to Pope Eleutherius concerning Montanism, and on that occasion bore emphatic testimony to his merits. Returning to Gaul, Irenaeus succeeded the martyr Saint Pothinus as Bishop of Lyons. During the religious peace which followed the persecution of Marcus Aurelius, the new bishop divided his activities between the duties of a pastor and of a missionary (as to which we have but brief data, late and not very certain) and his writings, almost all of which were directed against Gnosticism, the heresy then spreading in Gaul and elsewhere. In 190 or 191 he interceded with Pope Victor to lift the sentence of excommunication laid by that pontiff upon the Christian communities of Asia Minor which persevered in the practice of the Quartodecimans in regard to the celebration of Easter. Nothing is known of the date of his death, which must have occurred at the end of the second or the beginning of the third century. In spite of some isolated and later testimony to that effect, it is not very probable that he ended his career with martyrdom. His feast is celebrated on 28 June in the Latin Church, and on 23 August in the Greek.
    Irenaeus wrote in Greek many works which have secured for him an exceptional place in Christian literature, because in controverted religious questions of capital importance they exhibit the testimony of a contemporary of the heroic age of the Church, of one who had heard St. Polycarp, the disciple of St. John, and who, in a manner, belonged to the Apostolic Age. None of these writings has come down to us in the original text, though a great many fragments of them are extant as citations in later writers (Hippolytus, Eusebius, etc.). Two of these works, however, have reached us in their entirety in a Latin version:
    A treatise in five books, commonly entitled Adversus haereses, and devoted, according to its true title, to the "Detection and Overthrow of the False Knowledge" (see GNOSTICISM, sub-title Refutation of Gnosticism). Of this work we possess a very ancient Latin translation, the scrupulous fidelity of which is beyond doubt. It is the chief work of Irenaeus and truly of the highest importance; it contains a profound exposition not only of Gnosticism under its different forms, but also of the principal heresies which had sprung up in the various Christian communities, and thus constitutes an invaluable source of information on the most ancient ecclesiastical literature from its beginnings to the end of the second century. In refuting the heterodox systems Irenaeus often opposes to them the true doctrine of the Church, and in this way furnishes positive and very early evidence of high importance. Suffice it to mention the passages, so often and so fully commented upon by theologians and polemical writers, concerning the origin of the Gospel according to St. John (see GOSPEL OF SAINT JOHN), the Holy Eucharist, and the primacy of the Roman Church.
    Of a second work, written after the "Adversus Haereses", an ancient literal translation in the Armenian language. This is the "Proof of the Apostolic Preaching." The author's aim here is not to confute heretics, but to confirm the faithful by expounding the Christian doctrine to them, and notably by demonstrating the truth of the Gospel by means of the Old Testament prophecies. Although it contains fundamentally, so to speak, nothing that has not already been expounded in the "Adversus Haereses", it is a document of the highest interest, and a magnificent testimony of the deep and lively faith of Irenaeus.
    Of his other works only scattered fragments exist; many, indeed, are known only through the mention made of them by later writers, not even fragments of the works themselves having come down to us. These are a treatise against the Greeks entitled "On the Subject of Knowledge" (mentioned by Eusebius);
    a writing addressed to the Roman priest Florinus "On the Monarchy, or How God is not the Cause of Evil" (fragment in Eusebius);
    a work "On the Ogdoad", probably against the Ogdoad of Valentinus the Gnostic, written for the same priest Florinus, who had gone over to the sect of the Valentinians (fragment in Eusebius);
    a treatise on schism, addressed to Blastus (mentioned by Eusebius); a letter to Pope Victor against the Roman priest Florinus (fragment preserved in Syriac);
    another letter to the same on the Paschal controversies (extracts in Eusebius);
    other letters to various correspondents on the same subject (mentioned by Eusebius, a fragment preserved in Syriac);
    a book of divers discourses, probably a collection of homilies (mentioned by Eusebius); and
    other minor works for which we have less clear or less certain attestations.
    The four fragments which Pfaff published in 1715, ostensibly from a Turin manuscript, have been proven by Funk to be apocryphal, and Harnack has established the fact that Pfaff himself fabricated them. Text from the Catholic Encyclopedia

    #Novena to Our Lady of Perpetual Help - SHARE #Miracle #Prayer!

    NOVENA PRAYERS 1.COME HOLY GHOST
    (Kneel)
    Come, Holy Ghost, Creator blest, And in our Souls take up Thy rest, Come with Thy grace and heavenly aid To fill the hearts which Thou hast made.
    V. Send forth Thy Spirit and they shall be created;
    R. And Thou shalt renew the face of the earth. LET US PRAY
    O God , who didst teach the hearts of Thy faithful people by sending them the light of the Holy Spirit, grant us by the same Spirit, to have a right judgement in all things, and evermore to rejoice in his holy comfort, through Christ Our Lord, Amen 2. AN ACT OF CONTRITION
    (Here, O God is my sacrifice, a broken spirit; a heart that is humbled and contrite, thou O God, will never disdain; ps 50:19)
    My God, I believe in Thee.* I hope in thee .* I love Thee above all things.* With all my Soul,* With all my heart ,* and with all my strength ; * I love Thee because thou are infinitely good * And worthy of being loved * and because I love Thee,* I repent with all my heart * Of having offended Thee; * have mercy on me a sinner. Amen
    3. FOR THE INTENTIONS OF THE HOLY FATHER
    THE OUR FATHER
    Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be thy Name, Thy Kingdom come, Thy will be done on earth, as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread, and forgive us our trespasses , as we forgive those who trespass against us, and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen THE HAIL MARY
    Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee Blessed art thou amongst women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, JESUS , Holy Mary Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen THE GLORY BE TO THE FATHER
    Glory be to the Father, and to the Son and to the Holy spirit.
    As it was in the beginning , is now and ever shall be world without end . Amen
     4. INVOCATIONS TO OUR LADY
    We fly to thy patronage, O Holy Mother of God. Despise not our petitions in our necessities. But ever deliver us from all dangers O glorious and blessed Virgin. Priest : O Mother of Perpetual Succour, thou whose very name inspires confidence.
    People : Help me, O loving Mother.
    Pr. : That I may love and serve God with all my heart.
    Pe. : Help me, O loving mother
    Pr. : That I may never neglect prayer
    Pe. : Help me, O loving Mother.
    Pr. : In temptations against the holy vitue of purity
    Pe. : Help me, O loving Mother.
    Pr. : That I may quickly rise again should I have the misfortune to fall into sin.
    Pe. : Help me, O loving Mother
    Pr. : That I may courageously resist the seductions of the world, evil companions, bad books and films Pe. : Help me, O loving Mother.
    Pr. : That I may often and devoutly receive the Sacraments and fulfil my Christian duties and the duties of my state.
    Pe. : Help me, O loving Mother.
    Pr. : That I may be patient and resigned in all trials and troubles of life
    Pe. : Help me, O loving Mother.
    Pr. : In sickness and pain, in poverty and distress
    Pe. : Help me, O loving Mother.
    Pr. : That I may not delay my conversion from day to day
    Pe. : Help me, O loving Mother.
    Pr. : That I may ever love and serve thee and invoke thy assistance Pe. : Help me, O loving Mother.
    Pr. : That I may be able to lead others to love serve and pray to thee
    Pe. : Help me, O loving Mother.
    Pr. : When death is near and I am about to pass into eternity.
    Pe. : Help me, O loving Mother.
    Pr. : To my last hour, to my last breath do thou watch over me.

    Pe. : Help me, O loving Mother. Pr. : Pray for us O Mother of Perpetual Succour
    Pe. : Help me, O loving Mother.
    LET US PRAY O Almighty and merciful God * Who in order to assist the human race * Has willed the blessed virgin Mary * To become the Mother of Thy only-begotten Son * Grant we beseech Thee * That by her intercession * We may avoid the contagion of sin * And serve Thee with a pure heart * Through the same Christ Our Lord * Amen 5. SUMMARY OF PETITIONS & THANKSGIVINGS 6. NOVENA PRAYERS O Mother of Perpetual Succour * Behold me a miserable sinner at thy feet * I have recourse to thee and put my trust in thee * O Mother of Mercy, have pity upon me * I hear thee called by all * The refuge and the hope of sinners; * be then my refuge and my hope * Succour me for the love of Jesus Christ *; Stretch forth thy hand to me, * a poor sinner, * who recommend and dedicate myself to thee * As thy perpetual servant * I bless and thank God for having in His Mercy given me this confidence in Thee * the pledge , as I believe of my eternal salvation*
    Alas, too often in past times have I miserably fallen * Because I had not recourse to thee * I know that with thy help I shall conquer * I know that thou will help me * If I recommend myself to thee * But I fear lest in the occasion of failing * I should cease to call upon thee * And so should lose my soul * This then is the grace I seek from thee, * and I beg of thee, as far as I know how and can, * to obtain it for me * namely, in the assaults of hell,* always to have recourse to thee and to say to thee; * O mary help me * Mother of Perpetual Succour, * Suffer me not to lose my God * Amen.
    Priest : Mother of Perpetual Succour
    People : Pray for thy Children.
    Hail Mary.......... (Repeat three times)
    Holy Mary, * Succour the miserable, help the faint hearted * Cheer those that weep, *Pray for the people ,* be the advocate of the clergy, * Intercede for all devout women, * Let all feel thine aid,* Who implore thy perpetual succour.
    Priest : Thou has been made for us O Lady, a Refuge.
    People : A helper in need and tribulation.
    LET US PRAY
    O Lord Jesus Christ,* Who hast given us Thy Mother Mary, * Whose wondrous image we venerate, * To our Mother ,* Ever ready to succour us,* grant , we beseech Thee,* That we, who earnestly implore her maternal aid, * May deserve to enjoy perpetually the fruit of thy redemption * Who lives and reigns world without end. Amen.
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