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Wednesday, February 17, 2016

Catholic News World : Wed. February 17, 2016 - SHARE

2016


LIVE #PopeFrancis meets with 800 #Prison Inmates in #Mexico - #PapaenMex - FULL Video - Text
























Located in the middle of the Chihuahuan Desert, on the border with the United States. Pope Francis meets inmates at Ciudad Juarez at the Cereso 3 State prison. 800 inmates were chosen to meet the Pope.
FULL TEXT will be added:Please find below the full text of the Pope’s address to prison inmates at the Centre for Social Adjustment n.3 in Ciudad Juárez:
Dear Brothers and Sisters,
I am coming to the end of my visit to Mexico, and I could not leave without greeting you and celebrating with you the Jubilee of Mercy.
I am deeply grateful for your words of welcome, which express your many hopes and aspirations, as well as your many sorrows, fears and uncertainties.
During my visit to Africa, I was able to open the door of mercy for the whole world in the city of Bangui.  United to you and with you today, I want to reiterate once more the confidence that Jesus urges us to have: the mercy that embraces everyone and is found in every corner of the world.  There is no place beyond the reach of his mercy, no space or person it cannot touch.
Celebrating the Jubilee of Mercy with you is recalling the pressing journey that we must undertake in order to break the cycle of violence and crime.  We have already lost many decades thinking and believing that everything will be resolved by isolating, separating, incarcerating, and ridding ourselves of problems, believing that these policies really solve problems.  We have forgotten to focus on what must truly be our concern: people’s lives; their lives, those of their families, and those who have suffered because of this cycle of violence.
Divine Mercy reminds us that prisons are an indication of the kind of society we are.  In many cases they are a sign of the silence and omissions which have led to a throwaway culture, a symptom of a culture that has stopped supporting life, of a society that has abandoned its children.
Mercy reminds us that reintegration does not begin here within these walls; rather it begins before, it begins “outside”, in the streets of the city.  Reintegration or rehabilitation begins by creating a system which we could call social health, that is, a society which seeks not to cause sickness, polluting relationships in neighbourhoods, schools, town squares, the streets, homes and in the whole of the social spectrum.  A system of social health that endeavours to promote a culture which acts and seeks to prevent those situations and pathways that end in damaging and impairing the social fabric.
At times it may seem that prisons are intended more to prevent people from committing crimes than to promote the process of rehabilitation that allows us to address the social, psychological and family problems which lead a person to act in a certain way.  The problem of security is not resolved only by incarcerating; rather, it calls us to intervene by confronting the structural and cultural causes of insecurity that impact the entire social framework.
Jesus’ concern for the care of the hungry, the thirsty, the homeless and prisoners (cf. Mt 25:34-40) sought to express the core of the Father’s mercy.  This becomes a moral imperative for the whole of society that wishes to maintain the necessary conditions for a better common life.  It is within a society’s capacity to include the poor, infirm and imprisoned, that we see its ability to heal their wounds and make them builders of a peaceful coexistence.  Social reintegration begins by making sure that all of our children go to school and that their families obtain dignified work by creating public spaces for leisure and recreation, and by fostering civic participation, health services and access to basic services, to name just a few possible measures. 
Celebrating the Jubilee of Mercy with you means learning not to be prisoners of the past, of yesterday.  It means learning to open the door to the future, to tomorrow; it means believing that things can change.  Celebrating the Jubilee of Mercy with you means inviting you to lift up your heads and to work in order to gain this space of longed-for freedom.
We know that we cannot turn back, we know that what is done, is done.  This is the way I wanted to celebrate with you the Jubilee of Mercy, because it does not exclude the possibility of writing a new story and moving forward.  You suffer the pain of a failure, you feel the remorse of your actions and in many cases, with great limitations, you seek to remake your lives in the midst of solitude.  You have known the power of sorrow and sin, and have not forgotten that within your reach is the power of the resurrection, the power of divine mercy which makes all things new.  Now, this mercy can reach you in the hardest and most difficult of places, but such occasions can also perhaps bring truly positive results.  From inside this prison, you must work hard to change the situations which create the most exclusion.  Speak with your loved ones, tell them of your experiences, help them to put an end to this cycle of violence and exclusion.  The one who has suffered the greatest pain, and we could say “has experienced hell”, can become a prophet in society.  Work so that this society which uses people and discards them will not go on claiming victims.
I wish also to encourage those who work in this Centre or others like it: the directors, prison guards, and all who undertake any type of work in this Centre.  And I am also grateful for the efforts made by the chaplains, consecrated persons and lay faithful who have dedicated themselves to keeping alive the hope of the Gospel of Mercy in the prison.  Never forget that all of you can be signs of the heart of the Father.  We need one another to keep on moving forward.
Before giving you my blessing, I would like for us all to pray a moment in silence.  From the depths of our hearts, may each one of us ask God to help us believe in his mercy.


Wow #PopeFrancis leaves altar to Bless #Disabled Child in Wheelchair #PapaenMex - Video - SHARE

Pope Francis stopped the meeting with families in Tuxtla Gutierrez, to bless a child in a wheelchair. He walked down from his altar to bless the child, who was lifted up. Pope Francis calls this "cariñoterapia”, -or kindness therapy-, a term he made up during his visit to the Federico Gomez children's hospital in Mexico City. This severely disabled child in a wheelchair being lifted up is similar to the Gospel story in which the people bring the paralytic to Jesus.

Wow Planned Parenthood Clinic becomes #ProLife Pregnancy Center



Lc Clinic expanded into a new location, purchasing a building had belonged to Planned Parenthood.Lc Clinic expanded into a new location, purchasing a building had belonged to Planned Parenthood.Photo Courtesy: Lc Clinic

"Pro-love" Pregnancy Center Takes Over ex-Planned Parenthood Building Featured

It’s difficult to imagine a more stark contrast between successive tenants at the same location than those who have called 1109 South Sumner home in Creston, Iowa, over the past year.
The previous occupant, Planned Parenthood, had seen business slow to a trickle of patients. Too little income to keep a staff on hand, it could only open its doors by appointment. Even then, one of the few services it did provide was abortion via telemedicine, consisting of a video conference call with remote clinician who prescribed each patient a medication abortion.
The building’s new owners, Lc Clinic, couldn’t be more thrilled.
“We have had so many people coming in, and just to see these people’s lives being changed, to be a part of that, is a huge honor for me,” Hannah Shady, the clinic’s manager, said. “To be able to see some of the children, and to be able to share in their lives, the sadness, but also the joys and the triumphs is amazing.”
Lc Clinic’s suite of free, community-supported services includes pregnancy testing, limited ultrasounds, STI testing, options counseling, parenting classes, material assistance and more.
The clinic, which opened in July, is Lc Clinic’s second location, along with the original site in Stuart—40 minutes to the north. A five-minute walk from a Wal-Mart Supercenter, the building wasn’t necessarily on Lc Clinic’s wish list, even though the board and leadership staff was scouting out potential sites in Creston in early 2015.
This was all on the tail end of a 40 Days For Life campaign where a local pastor remembered joking with friends about the possibility of converting the Planned Parenthood building into a pro-life outpost.  
“We had no intentions of ever moving into that Planned Parenthood building,” Fennessey said. “It’s so many different crazy pieces. Obviously, it’s 100 percent God. There is no humanly way possible that this could ever have worked out.”
Fennessey, a registered nurse, started Lc Clinic in Stuart back in March 2012. With one of her board members a doctor who serves as medical director, Fennessey was able to add ultrasound services in December 2013.
Even as they went through two years of planning and working to launch the effort in Stuart, the group’s vision always went beyond her town, starting with Creston.
The gift of an upgraded—and mobile—ultrasound unit from Knights of Columbus this summer arrived just in time to use it in both locations.
“Even five years ago, six years ago, when there was no clinic yet, we were hoping and praying to start a pregnancy center in Creston,” Fennessey, who has seen her clinic’s budget double through fundraising in the past five years, said. “God just opened the doors to allow us to do crazy things through our tiny town of Stuart.”
Shady, who grew up in Creston, was part of the 40 Days For Life campaign outside what has now become her office. Her desire to see pregnancy help take root in her hometown had brought her into contact with Fennessey.
With a background in owning and operating small businesses and serving on boards, Shady—a self-described “organizational freak”—was a natural choice to as the Creston manager.
Her fitness for the position came into focus even before the site opened, when the Planned Parenthood clinic’s outgoing manager penned a fiery op-ed in the local paper, aimed at Lc Clinic
“People were very, very quickly jumping on one side or the other,” Shady said. “I’m what I like to call ‘pro-love.’ I love everyone, regardless of their opinions. I just told everyone, ‘Just take it easy and we’ll keep doing our thing. We know what we’re here for. We’re here to help people. We’re here to love people.’”
The move into a former Planned Parenthood is one of only two known instances where a pro-life pregnancy center has repurposed a property once belonging to the abortion giant. Hope Pregnancy Centers of Brazos Valley (TX) is the other, having cut the ribbon on a former Planned Parenthood flagship in November of 2015.
Heartbeat of Miami (FL) recently repurposed its second shuttered abortion facility, while the building at 72 Ransom Ave. in Grand Rapids, Mich., that once housed an abortion facility is now home to LIFE InternationalThe National Memorial for the Unborn in Chattanooga, Tenn., is also a converted abortion clinic.
“This is really what I want to do for the rest of my life,” Shady said. “We care about our clients. We love them and love to show them real help.” 



Along with free services such as limited ultrasound and material aid, Lc Clinic offers free STI testing, options counseling, parenting classes and more.
Shared from Pregnancyhelpnews

Today's Mass Readings and Video : Wed. February 17, 2016


Wednesday of the First Week in Lent
Lectionary: 226


Reading 1JON 3:1-10

The word of the LORD came to Jonah a second time:
“Set out for the great city of Nineveh,
and announce to it the message that I will tell you.”
So Jonah made ready and went to Nineveh,
according to the LORD’s bidding.
Now Nineveh was an enormously large city;
it took three days to go through it.
Jonah began his journey through the city,
and had gone but a single day’s walk announcing,
“Forty days more and Nineveh shall be destroyed,”
when the people of Nineveh believed God;
they proclaimed a fast
and all of them, great and small, put on sackcloth.

When the news reached the king of Nineveh,
he rose from his throne, laid aside his robe,
covered himself with sackcloth, and sat in the ashes.
Then he had this proclaimed throughout Nineveh,
by decree of the king and his nobles:
“Neither man nor beast, neither cattle nor sheep,
shall taste anything;
they shall not eat, nor shall they drink water.
Man and beast shall be covered with sackcloth and call loudly to God;
every man shall turn from his evil way
and from the violence he has in hand.
Who knows, God may relent and forgive, and withhold his blazing wrath,
so that we shall not perish.”
When God saw by their actions how they turned from their evil way,
he repented of the evil that he had threatened to do to them;
he did not carry it out.

Responsorial PsalmPS 51:3-4, 12-13, 18-19

R. (19b) A heart contrite and humbled, O God, you will not spurn.
Have mercy on me, O God, in your goodness;
in the greatness of your compassion wipe out my offense.
Thoroughly wash me from my guilt
and of my sin cleanse me.
R. A heart contrite and humbled, O God, you will not spurn.
A clean heart create for me, O God,
and a steadfast spirit renew within me.
Cast me not out from your presence,
and your Holy Spirit take not from me.
R. A heart contrite and humbled, O God, you will not spurn.
For you are not pleased with sacrifices;
should I offer a burnt offering, you would not accept it.
My sacrifice, O God, is a contrite spirit;
a heart contrite and humbled, O God, you will not spurn.
R. A heart contrite and humbled, O God, you will not spurn.

Verse Before The GospelJL 2:12-13

Even now, says the LORD,
return to me with your whole heart
for I am gracious and merciful.

GospelLK 11:29-32

While still more people gathered in the crowd, Jesus said to them,
“This generation is an evil generation;
it seeks a sign, but no sign will be given it,
except the sign of Jonah.
Just as Jonah became a sign to the Ninevites,
so will the Son of Man be to this generation.
At the judgment
the queen of the south will rise with the men of this generation
and she will condemn them,
because she came from the ends of the earth
to hear the wisdom of Solomon,
and there is something greater than Solomon here.
At the judgment the men of Nineveh will arise with this generation
and condemn it,
because at the preaching of Jonah they repented,
and there is something greater than Jonah here.”

Latest #News of #Vatican Information Service and #PapaenMex - #PopeFrancis in Mexico - SHARE


17-02-2016 - Year XXVI - Num. 33 

Summary
- To the clergy in Morelia: do not give in to the temptation of resignation
- Young Mexicans, the greatest treasure of this land
- Pope's telegram for the death of the UN ex-Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali
- Other Pontifical Acts
To the clergy in Morelia: do not give in to the temptation of resignation
Vatican City, 17 February 2016 (VIS) – Yesterday, Tuesday 16 February, the Pope arrived at8.45 a.m. (local time, 3.45 p.m. in Rome) in Morelia, capital of the state of Michoacan, the geographical centre of Mexico and since 1991 a UNESCO World Heritage site on account of its Hispanic historic centre and baroque architecture, notably the Cathedral of the Transfiguration and the Palace of Justice. It is also the seat of an important university, the Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, founded in 1551 as the Colegio de San Nicolas, and currently attended by 45,000 students.
The Pope travelled by popemobile the nine kilometres separating the airport from the Venustiano Carranza stadium, which is able to hold 20,000 people. He was awaited by the priests, men and women religious, consecrated persons and seminarians of the archdiocese. During the Mass, celebrated by the Holy Father, the purhepecha language was used for the prayer of the faithful.
The Pope began his homily in a colloquial fashion: "There is a saying among us which goes 'tell me how you pray, and I will tell you how you live; tell me how you live and I will tell you how you pray. Because showing me how you pray, I will learn to find the God for Whom you live, and showing me how you live, I will learn to believe in the God to Whom you pray'. For our life speaks of prayer and prayer speaks of our life; praying is something learned, just as we learn to walk, to speak, to listen. The school of prayer is the school of life and in the school of life we progress in the school of prayer".
 He commented that Paul said to his favourite disciple Timothy, while teaching or encouraging him to live the faith: “Remember your mother and your grandmother”. "And seminarians, when entering seminary often used to tell me: 'Father, I would like to have deeper mental prayer'. 'Look, you carry on praying as they taught you to at home and then later, little by little, your prayer will mature, just as you grew up'. Praying is something learned, just like life".
"Jesus wished to introduce His companions into the mystery of Life, into the mystery of His life. He showed them by eating, sleeping, healing, preaching and praying, what it means to be Son of God. He invited them to share His life, His interiority, and in His presence among them He allowed them to touch, in His flesh, the life of the Father. He helped them to experience, in His gaze, in His going out in power, the newness of saying 'Our Father'. In Jesus this expression 'Our Father' has no trace of routine or mere repetition. On the contrary, it contains a sense of life, of experience, of authenticity. With these two words, 'Our Father', He knew how to live praying and to pray living. Jesus invites us to do the same. Our first call is to experience this merciful love of the Father in our lives, in our experiences. His first call is to introduce us into the new dynamic of love, of sonship. Our first calling is to learn to say, 'Our Father', as Paul insists: Abba. 'Woe to me if I do not preach the Gospel!', says St. Paul, 'Woe to me!'. For to evangelise, he continues, is not a cause for glory but rather a need".
"He has invited us to share in His life, His divine life, and woe to us consecrated men and women, seminarians, priests, bishops, woe to us if we do not share it, woe to us if we are not witnesses to what we have seen and heard, woe to us. We do not want to be 'administrators of the divine', we are not and do not want to be employees in God’s firm, for we are invited to share in His life, we are invited to enter into His heart, a heart that prays and lives, saying, 'Our Father'. What is our mission if not to say with our lives ... 'Our Father'?"
He Who is Our Father, it is He to Whom we pray every day with insistence. And what do we tell Him in one of the petitions of that prayer? Lead us not into temptation. Jesus Himself did the same thing. He prayed that His disciples – yesterday’s and today’s – would not fall into temptation. What could be one of the sins which besets us? What could be one of the temptations which springs up not only in contemplating reality but also in living it? What temptation can come to us from places often dominated by violence, corruption, drug trafficking, disregard for human dignity, and indifference in the face of suffering and vulnerability? What temptation might we suffer over and over again – we who are called to the consecrated life, to the presbyterate, to the episcopate – what temptation could might we endure in the face of all this, in the face of this reality which seems to have become a permanent system?"
 "I think that we could sum it up in a single word: 'resignation'. And faced with this reality, the devil can overcome us with one of his favourite weapons: resignation. 'And what are you going to do about it? Life is like that'. A resignation which paralyses us and prevents us not only from walking, but also from making the journey; a resignation which not only terrifies us, but which also entrenches us in our 'sacristies' and false securities; a resignation which not only prevents us from proclaiming, but also inhibits our giving praise and takes away the joy, the joy of giving praise. A resignation which not only hinders our looking to the future, but also stifles our desire to take risks and to change. And so, 'Our Father, lead us not into temptation'".
"How good it is for us to tap into our memories when we are tempted", exclaimed the Pope. "How much it helps us to look at the 'stuff' of which we are made. It did not all begin with us, nor will it all end with us, and so it does us good to look back at our past experiences which have brought us to the present. And in this remembering, we cannot overlook someone who loved this place so much, who made himself a son of this land", he continued, referring to the Spanish Vasco Vazquez de Quiroga, first bishop of Michoacan. "We cannot overlook that person who could say of himself: 'They took me from the tribunal and put me in charge of the priesthood for my sins. Me, useless and quite unable to carry out such a great undertaking; me, who didn’t know how to use an oar, they chose me to be the first Bishop of Michoacan'".
"With you, I would like to recall this evangeliser, first known as 'the Spaniard who became an Indian'. The situation of the Purhepechas Indians, whom he described as being 'sold, humiliated, and homeless in marketplaces, picking up scraps of bread from the ground', far from tempting him to listless resignation, succeeded in kindling his faith, strengthening his compassion and inspiring him to carry out plans that were a 'breath of fresh air' in the midst of so much paralysing injustice. The pain and suffering of his brothers and sisters became his prayer, and his prayer led to his response. And among the Indians, he was known as 'Tata Vasco', which in the Purhepechan language means, Father".
Father, dad, daddy", invoked the Holy Father at the end of his homily, "Lead us not into the temptation of resignation, lead us not into the temptation of falling into sloth, lead us not into the temptation of losing our memory, lead us not into the temptation of forgetting our elders who taught us by their lives to say, 'Our Father'".
After the celebration, the Pope transferred to the archiepiscopal residence of Morelia where he lunched, and from there proceeded to the Cathedral of the Transfiguration (1644-1744), baroque in style with neo-Classical elements and tiled domes, which dominates the Plaza de las Armas. In the sacristy, where alongside sixteenth-century paintings, there is a figure of Christ made using a mix of corn and honey using pre-Hispanic techniques, Francis met and conversed with fourteen rectors of Mexican universities and six leaders of other Christian confessions.
 The Holy Father was also greeted by around one hundred children, catechumens, whom he thanked for their visit. "I will ask Jesus to let you grow surrounded by love, like He did", he said. "With much love so as to be true Christians, to fulfil the commandment that Jesus gave us: to love God above all else, and our neighbour as Jesus did, as we love ourselves or better, as He loved us. And we will also ask Our Lady to look after us and to bless us. Above all, let all of us think in our hearts of our families and our friends, and even if you are at odds with any of them, ask the Virgin to care for them all the same; in this way we make friends rather than enemies, because life is not good with enemies, and He Whom makes us true friends is God, in our heart".
Likewise he congratulated the choir which had dedicated a song to him, commenting that "art and sport enlarge our hearts and make us grow well, with fresh air and without crushing life. Continue to be creative", he added, "in search of beauty, of good things, of that which lasts for ever, and never let anyone trample on this".
Young Mexicans, the greatest treasure of this land
Vatican City, 17 February 2016 (VIS) – At 4 p.m. local time (11 p.m. in Rome), Francis arrived at the Jose Maria Morelos y Pavon stadium in the city of Morelia, where he was awaited by around fifty thousand young people. The festive encounter was filled with songs, dance and testimonies from Daniela, Alberto, Roberto and Rosario, all young people who told the Pope about the realities of their lives. The problems of work, the difficulties faced by families and the need for hope were the key themes. "Today the young people of Mexico see in you the face of the hope we need".
 "I already knew your concerns because I was given a draft copy of what you might say", said the Pope; "I have to be honest, why tell you a lie! But as you were speaking I also took some notes of the things which seemed more important so that they would not be left hanging in the air. I have to tell you that when I arrived in this country I received a warm welcome and I saw something that I knew for a long time: the vitality, the joy, and the festive spirit of the Mexican people. And now after listening to you, but particularly after seeing you, I am also certain about something else, something I said to the President of the nation when I arrived. One of Mexico’s greatest treasures is that it has a youthful face: its young people. Yes, you are the wealth of this land. Careful though! I did not say the hope of this land, but its wealth".
"The mountain may have rich minerals to serve humanity’s advancement, in terms of its wealth, but that richness has to be converted into hope by hard work, just as miners do when they extract those minerals. You are this wealth, and it has to be converted into hope. And Daniela concluded by offering us a challenge, as well as giving us some guidance about hope. But all who spoke about their difficulties and their experiences expressed a great truth: 'all of us can live but we cannot live without hope'. You cannot look to the future if you do not first know how to value yourselves, if you do not feel that your life, your hands, your history, is worth the effort".
"It is about feeling what Alberto described: 'with my hands, with my heart and my mind I can build up hope; if I do not perceive that hope, then it cannot enter my heart'. Hope is born when you are able to experience that all is not lost; and for this to happen it is necessary to start 'at home', to begin with yourself. Not everything is lost. I am not lost; I am worth something, I am worth a lot. I ask you for some silence now, and I ask each one of you to ask himself or herself: 'Is it true that not everything is lost?' 'Am I lost?' 'Do I have worth?' 'Am I worth a little, a lot?'. The biggest threats to hope are those words which devalue you, words which suck out your value and you end up feeling down, is this not so? Words which make you feel second rate, even fourth rate. The biggest threat to hope is when you feel that you do not matter to anybody or that that you have been left aside. This is the great obstacle to hope: when, in a family, society, school or a group of friends, you are made to feel unimportant to them. This is hard and painful, but it does happen, am I right? Yes or no? [They reply 'Yes']. Yes, it happens. This kills, this crushes us and opens the door to much suffering".
"But there is also another principal threat to the hope that your richness will grow and bear fruit, and it is this: to allow yourself to believe that you begin to be valuable when you start wearing the right clothes, the latest brands and fashions, or when you start enjoying prestige and importance because you have money; but in the depths of your heart you do not believe that you are worthy of kindness or love and this is something which your heart intuits. Hope is silenced by what they make you believe, and they don’t let you flourish. The biggest threat is when a person feels that they must have money to buy everything, including the love of others. The biggest threat is to believe that by having a big car you will be happy. Is this true, that by having a big car you will be happy?" [They reply: 'No'].
"You are the wealth of Mexico, you are the wealth of the Church. Allow me to tell you a phrase from my country: 'I am not massaging your back'; 'I am not flattering you'. I understand that often it is difficult to feel your value when you are continually exposed to the loss of friends or relatives at the hands of the drug trade, of drugs themselves, of criminal organizations that sow terror. It is hard to feel the wealth of a nation when there are no opportunities for dignified work – Alberto you expressed this clearly – no possibilities for study or advancement, when you feel your rights are not recognised, which then leads you to extreme situations. It is difficult to appreciate the value of a place when, because of your youth, you are used for selfish purposes, seduced by promises that end up being untrue. They are like soap bubbles. And it is difficult to feel valuable in these cases. You bear your value inside and your hope too; but it is not easy, due to the things I am telling you and to the things you have told us: there is a lack of work and study opportunities, as Roberto and Alberto said".
"Nonetheless, despite all this, I will never tire of saying, You are the wealth of Mexico. Roberto, you used a phrase which I may have overlooked when I read the draft, but it’s something I want to come back to. You spoke about losing something and yet you did not say: 'I lost my cell phone, I lost my wallet with money in it'. We have lost the wonder of walking together, we have lost the delight of dreaming together, so that this wealth, moved by hope, can take us forward; we need to walk together, we need to meet, and we need to dream. Do not lose the fascinating power of dreaming! Have the courage to dream! To dream, which is not the same as being sleepyheads, right?"
"And don’t think I am saying this – that you are the wealth of Mexico and that this richness goes forward when it is full of hope – because I am good, or I because I have clear ideas about it; no dear friends, it is not like that. I say this to you and I am convinced of it. And do you know why? Because, like you, I believe in Jesus Christ. And I think Daniela was very brave when she spoke to us about this. I believe in Jesus Christ and that is why I tell you this. It is He Who continually renews in me this hope, it is He Who continually renews my outlook. It is He Who awakens in me, in each one of us, the wonder of enjoying, the charm of dreaming, the delight of working together. It is He Who continually invites me to a conversion of heart. Yes, my friends, I say this because in Jesus I have found the one who is able to bring out the best in me. Hand in hand with Him, we can move forward, hand in hand with Him we can begin again and again, hand in hand with Him we can say: it is a lie to believe that the only way to live, or to be young, is to entrust oneself to drug dealers or others who do nothing but sow destruction and death. This is a lie and we say it holding on to Jesus’ hand. It is also hand in hand with Jesus Christ, with the Lord, that we can say: it is a lie that the only way to live as young people here is in poverty and exclusion; in the exclusion of opportunities, in the exclusion of spaces, in the exclusion of training and education, in the exclusion of hope. It is Jesus Christ Who refutes all attempts to render you useless or to be mere mercenaries of other people’s ambitions. They are ambitions which exclude you, to use you in the areas I mentioned, which you know well, and which end up destroying. And the only one that can grab me firmly by the hand is Jesus Christ; He can convert this wealth into hope".
"You have asked me for a word of hope, and the one word I have to give you, which is the foundation of everything, is Jesus Christ. When everything seems too much, when it seems that the world is crashing down on you, embrace His Cross, draw close to Him and please, never let go of His hand, even if they are dragging you; and, if you should fall, allow Him to lift you up. Mountain climbers have a lovely song which I like to repeat to young people. As they go up the mountain they sing: 'In the art of climbing upwards, the triumph is not in not falling but rather in not staying down on the ground'. This is the art, and, who is the only one who can take you by the hand so that you are not left lying on the ground? Jesus Christ is the only one. Jesus Christ, Who sometimes sends a brother or sister to speak to you or help you. Don’t hide your hand when you have fallen, do not say to him: 'Don’t look at me, I am covered in mud. Don’t look at me, I am without hope'. You have only to let him grab your hand and you his, and then that richness which is inside you, which is covered in mud, and which you have given up on, will begin, through hope, to bear fruit. But always holding onto Jesus’ hand".
"This is the way, do not forget: 'In the art of climbing upwards, the triumph is not in not falling but rather in not staying down on the ground'. Never allow yourselves to stay down, fallen on the ground! Never! Agreed? And if you see a friend who slipped up in life and has fallen, go and offer him or her your hand, but do so with dignity. Put yourself on their level, listen to them and don’t say: 'I have the solution for you'. No, as a friend, slowly give them strength by your words, give them strength by your listening, that medicine which sadly is being forgotten: 'the therapy of listening'. Let them speak, let them share their experience, and then little by little, they will offer you their hand, and, in the name of Jesus Christ, you can help them. 'But if you go in suddenly and begin to give them a sermon, going on about the same thing, well then, he or she will be worse off than before. Am I clear? [They reply: 'Yes']. Never let go of Jesus’ hand, never leave him; and if you do move away from him, get up and keep moving forwards, He understands what you are going through. Hand in hand with Jesus it is possible to live fully, by holding his hand it is possible to believe that life is worth the effort, it is worth giving of your best, to be leaven, salt and light among friends, in neighbourhoods, communities, and families".
"For this reason, dear friends, holding the hand of Jesus I ask you to not let yourselves be excluded, do not allow yourselves to be devalued, do not let them treat you like a commodity. For this Jesus have us good advice, so that we would not be left excluded, left without value, treated as a commodity: 'Be astute as serpents but humble as doves'. These two virtues go together. Young people do not lack a lively mind but they do sometimes lack that astuteness which would prevent them from being naive. The two things: astuteness but with simplicity and goodness. Of course, on this journey you may perhaps not be able to have the latest car model at the door, you will not have pockets filled with money, but you will have something that no one can take away from you, which is the experience of being loved, embraced and accompanied. It is the delight of enjoying an encounter, the delight of dreaming and desiring encounter among everyone. It is the experience of being family, of feeling oneself as part of a community. It is the experience of being able to look at the world in the face, with your head held up high, without the car, without the money, but with your head held high: this is dignity. Three words we want to repeat: value, because you have been made valuable; hope, because we want to be open to hope; and dignity. Let us repeat these three words: value, hope and dignity. It is the value, the worth that God has given you. You are the wealth of Mexico. The hope and dignity which Jesus Christ gives you means not allowing 'your backs to be massaged' and not allowing yourselves to be used as commodities to fill the pockets of other people".
"Today the Lord continues to call you, he continues to draw you to him, just as he did with the Indian, Juan Diego. He invites you to build a shrine. A shrine that is not a physical place but rather a community, a shrine called 'Parish', a shrine called, 'Nation'. Being a community, a family, and knowing that we are citizens is one of the best antidotes to all that threatens us, because it makes us feel that we are a part of the great family of God. This is not an invitation to flee and enclose ourselves, to escape from the threats that exist in life or to escape from challenges, but, on the contrary, it is an invitation to go out and to invite others, to go out and proclaim to others that being young in Mexico is the greatest wealth, and consequently, it cannot be sacrificed. For this great value of ours is capable of hope and it gives us dignity. Again these three words: value, hope and dignity. But it is a value, a richness, which God has given us and which we have to make grow".
"Jesus, who gives us hope, would never ask us to be assassins; rather, he calls us disciples, he calls us friends. Jesus would never send us out to death, but rather everything in him speaks of life. A life in a family, life in a community; families and communities for the good of society. And here, Rosario, I refer to what you said, something really beautiful: 'In the family we learn closeness'. In the family we learn solidarity, how to share, to discern, to walk ahead with each other’s problems, to fight and to make up, to argue and to embrace and to kiss. The family is the first school of the nation, and in the family you will find that richness and value that you have. The family is like the custodian of that great value, in the family you will find hope, for Jesus is there, and in the family you will have dignity. Never, never put the family to one side; the family is the founding stone upon which a great nation is built. You are so valuable, you have hope and you dream – Rosario also spoke of dreaming – 'Do you dream of having a family?' They reply: 'Yes']".
"Dear brothers and sisters, you are the wealth of this country, and when you doubt this, look to Jesus Christ, who is the hope, he who destroys all efforts to make you useless or mere instruments of other people’s ambitions. I thank you for this meeting and I ask you to pray for me. Thank you".
The Pope then proceeded to Morelia heliport to transfer to the airport for his return flight to Mexico City. He travelled directly from the airport to the apostolic nunciature, where he arrived at 7.40 p.m. local time (2.40 a.m. in Rome).
Today at 7.30 local time (2.30 p.m. in Rome) the Holy Father travelled by air to Ciudad Juarez, the final leg of his apostolic trip in Mexico. There he will first visit the "Centro de Readaptacion Social Estatal No.3" penitentiary where he will meet with detainees and their families. He will then meet with representatives of the world of work at the Colegio de Bachilleres of the State of Chihuahua. Three hours after lunch in the Ciudad Juarez archdiocesan seminary at 1.15 p.m. local time (9.15 p.m. in Rome), he will celebrate Mass close to the border between Mexico and the United States. Finally, he will transfer directly to the airport where at 7.15 p.m. local time (3.15 a.m. in Rome) he will depart for Italy. The aircraft carrying the Pope is expected to land in Rome at 3.15 p.m. tomorrow.
Pope's telegram for the death of the UN ex-Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali
Vatican City, 17 February 2016 (VIS) – Cardinal Secretary of State Pietro Parolin has sent a telegram of condolences on behalf of the Holy Father to Ban Ki-Moon, secretary general of the United Nations, following the death of former secretary general Boutros Boutros-Ghali.
In the text, the Holy Father extends heartfelt condolences to the family of the deceased and his colleagues at the United Nations Organisation. Recalling Mr Boutros-Ghali’s generous service to his country and to the international community, His Holiness offers the assurance of his prayers for the late Secretary-General’s eternal rest, and invokes divine blessings of peace and strength upon the members of his family and all who mourn his loss.
Other Pontifical Acts
Vatican City, 17 February 2016 (VIS) – The Holy Father has:
- appointed Bishop John D. Deshotel, auxiliary of Dallas, U.S.A., as bishop of Lafayette (area 14,962, population 634,000, Catholics 332,000, priests 213, permanent deacons 94, religious 217), U.S.A. He succeeds Bishop Charles M. Jarrell, whose resignation from the pastoral care of the same diocese upon reaching the age limit was accepted by the Holy Father.
- appointed Fr. Ricardo Hoepers as bishop of Rio Grande (area 12,270, population 300,000, Catholics 211,000, priests 29, permanent deacons 29, religious 72), Brazil. The bishop-elect was born in Curitiba, Brazil in 1970 and ordained a priest in 1999. He holds a doctorate in theology and has served as lecturer in the faculty of philosophy and rector of the Bom Pastor seminary, professor, parish priest, diocesan coordinator for the clergy, member of the presbyterium and member of the ethical committee of the Federal University of Paran and the Brazilian Society of Moral Theology. He succeeds Msgr. Jose Mario Stroeher, whose resignation from the pastoral care of the same diocese was accepted upon reaching the age limit.
- appointed Fr. Richard Kuuia Baawobr, M.Afr., as bishop of Wa (area 18,476, population 700,000, Catholics 341,000, priests 104, religious 186), Ghana. The bishop-elect was born in Tom-Zendagangn, Ghana in 1959, gave his religious vows in 1981 and was ordained a priest in 1987. He has served in a number of roles within his order, as well as deputy Grand Chancellor of the Pontifical Institute for Arabic and Islamic Studies, and member of the Synod on the family, and is currently superior general of his order. He succeeds Bishop Paul Bemile, whose resignation from the pastoral care of the same diocese upon reaching the age limit was accepted by the Holy Father.
- appointed Fr. Carlos Alberto Breis Pereira, O.F.M., as coadjutor bishop of Juazeiro (area 58,397, population 515,900, Catholics 413,100, priests 26, religious 14), Brazil. The bishop-elect was born in San Francisco do Sul, Brazil in 1965, gave his religious vows in 1987 and was ordained a priest in 1994. He holds a licentiate in theology, has served as parish priest and has held numerous roles within his order. He is currently provincial minister of his order in Recife, Brazil.
- accepted the resignation of Bishop Dieter Bernd Scholz, S.J., from the pastoral care of the diocese of Chinhoyi, Zimbabwe, upon reaching the age limit.
- appointed Archbishop Robert Christopher Ndlovu of Harare, Zimbabwe, as apostolic administrator sede vacante of the diocese of Chinhoyi, Zimbabwe.

#PopeFrancis "..in Jesus I have found the One who is able to bring out the best in me." FULL TEXT - Video - to Youth in Mexico

Pope Francis told tens of thousands of young Mexicans gathered in Morelia's sports stadium that they are the wealth of the nation. - AP
Pope Francis told tens of thousands of young Mexicans gathered in Morelia's sports stadium that they are the wealth of the nation. - AP
16/02/2016 23:38




(Vatican Radio) Pope Francis on Tuesday met with tens of thousands of young Mexicans from across the country, telling them that they are the wealth of the nation.
After evidently enjoying the singing and dancing performed by hundreds of youngsters in colourful local costumes, the Pope told them to put their hope, not in money or material things, but in Jesus Christ who is calling them to be ‘salt and light’ among their friends and their communities.
Pope Francis also told the young people he understands the difficulties they face when they lose friends or relatives to drugs or criminal organizations, when they have no job opportunities or feel their rights are being trampled on. But he told them never to lose hope, to draw close to Jesus and to go out and proclaim their faith to others.
Please find below Pope Francis’ prepared remarks to young people in the José María Morellos y Pavón Stadium, Morelia, Mexico
Dear young friends,
            Good afternoon.         When I arrived in this country I received a warm welcome.  I saw something which I have sensed for a long time: the vitality, the joy, and the festive spirit of the Mexican people.  And now [ahorita]… after listening to you, but particularly after seeing you, I am also certain about something else, something I said to the President of the nation when I arrived.  One of Mexico’s greatest treasures is that it has a youthful face: its young people.  Yes, you are the wealth of this land.  I did not say the hope of this land, but its wealth.
            You cannot live in hope, or look to the future if you do not first know how to value yourselves, if you do not feel that your life, your hands, your history, is worth the effort.  Hope is born when you are able to experience that all is not lost; and for this to happen it is necessary to start “at home”, to begin with yourself.  Not everything is lost.  I am not lost; I am worth something, I am worth a lot.  The biggest threats to hope are those words which devalue you, which make you feel second rate.  The biggest threat to hope is when you feel that you do not matter to anybody or that that you have been left aside.  The biggest threat to hope is when you feel that, either being present or absent, you make no difference.  This kills, this crushes us and opens the door to much suffering.  The principal threat to hope is to allow yourself to believe that you begin to be valuable when you start wearing the right clothes, the latest brands and fashions, or when you enjoy prestige, are important because you have money; but in the depths of your heart you do not believe that you are worthy of kindness or love.  The biggest threat is when a person feels that they must have money to buy everything, including the love of others.  The biggest threat is to believe that by having a big car you will be happy.
            You are the wealth of Mexico, you are the wealth of the Church.  I understand that often it is difficult to feel your value when you are continually exposed to the loss of friends or relatives at the hands of the drug trade, of drugs themselves, of criminal organizations that sow terror.  It is hard to feel the wealth of a nation when there are no opportunities for dignified work, no possibilities for study or advancement, when you feel your rights are being trampled on, which then leads you to extreme situations.  It is difficult to appreciate the value of a place when, because of your youth, you are used for selfish purposes, seduced by promises that end up being untrue.
            Nonetheless, despite all this, I will never tire of saying, You are the wealth of Mexico.
            Don’t think I am saying this because I am good, or I because I have concise ideas about it; no dear friends, it is not like that.  I say this to you and I am convinced of it.  And do you know why?  Because, like you, I believe in Jesus Christ.  And it is he who continually renews in me this hope, it is he who continually renews my outlook.  It is he who continually invites me to a conversion of heart.  Yes, my friends, I say this because in Jesus I have found the One who is able to bring out the best in me.  Hand in hand with him, we can move forward, hand in hand with him we can begin again and again, hand in hand with him we find the strength to say: it is a lie to believe that the only way to live, or to be young, is to entrust oneself to drug dealers or others who do nothing but sow destruction and death.  Hand in hand with Jesus Christ we can say: it is a lie that the only way to live as young people here is in poverty and exclusion; in the exclusion of opportunities, in the exclusion of spaces, in the exclusion of training and education, in the exclusion of hope.  It is Jesus Christ who refutes all attempts to render you useless or to be mere mercenaries of other people’s ambitions.
            You have asked me for a word of hope, and the one word I have to give you, is Jesus Christ.  When everything seems too much, when it seems that the world is crashing down around you, embrace his Cross, draw close to him and please, never let go of his hand; please, never leave him.  Hand in hand with him it is possible to live fully, by holding his hand it is possible to believe that it is worth the effort to give your best, to be leaven, salt and light among your friends, neighbourhoods, and your community.  For this reason, dear friends, holding the hand of Jesus I ask you to not let yourselves be excluded, do not allow yourselves to be devalued, do not let them treat you like a commodity.  Of course, you may not be able to have the latest car model at the door, you will not have pockets filled with money, but you will have something that no one can take away from you, which is the experience of being loved, embraced and accompanied.  It is the experience of being family, of feeling oneself as part of a community.
            Today the Lord continues to call you, he continues to draw you to him, just as he did with the Indian, Juan Diego.  He invites you to build a shrine.  A shrine that is not a physical place but rather a community, a shrine called “Parish”, a shrine called, “Nation”.  Being a community, a family, and knowing that we are citizens is one of the best antidotes to all that threatens us, because it makes us  feel that we are a part of the great family of God.  This is not an invitation to flee and enclose ourselves, but, on the contrary, to go out and to invite others, to go out and proclaim to others that being young in Mexico is the greatest wealth, and consequently, it cannot be sacrificed.
            Jesus would never ask us to be assassins; rather, he calls us to be disciples. He would never send us out to death, but rather everything in him speaks of life.  A life in a family, life in a community; families and communities for the good of society.
            You are the wealth of this country, and when you doubt this, look to Jesus, he who destroys all efforts to make you useless or mere instruments of other people’s ambitions

Saint February 17 : Founders of the Orders of Servites



Information:
Feast Day:February 17
Between the years 1225 and 1227 seven young Florentines joined the Confraternity of the Blessed Virgin—popularly known as the 'Laudesi' or Praisers. It was a period when the prosperous city of Florence was being rent by political factions and distracted by the heresy of the Cathari: it was also a time of general relaxation of morals even where devotional practices were retained. These young men were members of the most prominent families of the city. Whether they were all friends before they joined the Laudesi is not clear, but in that confraternity they became closely allied.

The eldest was Buonfiglio Monaldo, who became their leader. The others were Alexis Falconieri, Benedict dell' Antella, Bartholomew Amidei, Ricovero Uguccione, Gerardino Sostegni, and John Buonagiunta. They had as their spiritual director James of Poggibonsi, who was chaplain of the Laudesi, a man of great holiness and spiritual insight. All of them came to realize the call to a life of renunciation, and they determined to have recourse to our Lady in their perplexity. On the feast of the Assumption, as they were absorbed in prayer, they saw her in a vision, and were inspired by her to withdraw from the world into a solitary place and to live for God alone. There were difficulties, because, though three of them were celibates, four had been married and had ties, although two had become widowers. Suitable provision for their dependents was arranged, and with the approval of the bishop they withdrew from the world and betook themselves to a house called La Carmarzia, outside the gates of Florence, twenty-three days after they had received their call. Before long they found themselves so much disturbed by constant visitors from Florence that they decided to withdraw to the wild and deserted slopes of Monte Senario, where they built a simple church and hermitage and lived a life of almost incredible austerity.
In spite of difficulties, visitors sometimes found their way to the hermits and many wished to join them, but they refused to accept recruits. So they continued to live for several years,—until they were visited by their bishop, Ardingo, and Cardinal Castiglione, who had heard about their sanctity. He was greatly edified, but made one adverse criticism: 'You treat yourselves in a manner bordering on barbarity: and you seem more desirous of dying to time than of living for eternity. Take heed: the enemy of souls often hides himself under the appearance of an angel of light . . . Hearken to the counsels of your superiors.'
Again the solitaries gave themselves up to prayer for light, and again they had a vision of our Lady, who bore in her hand a black habit while an angel held a scroll inscribed with the title of Servants of Mary. She told them she—had chosen them to be her servants, that she wished them to wear the black habit, and to follow the Rule of St. Augustine. From that date, April 13, 1240, they were known as the Servants of Mary, or Servites.
They were clothed by the bishop himself, Buonfiglio being elected their superior. According to custom they selected names by which they should thenceforth be known, and became Brothers Bonfilius, Alexis, Amadeus, Hugh, Sostenes, Manettus and Buonagiunta. By the wish of the bishop, all except St. Alexis, who in his humility begged to be excused, prepared to receive holy orders, and in due time they were fully professed and ordained priests. The new order, which took a form more like that of the mendicant friars than that of the monastic orders, increased amazingly, and it soon became necessary to form fresh houses. Siena, Pistoia and Arezzo were the first places chosen, and afterwards the houses at Carfaggio, the convent and church of the Santissima Annunziata in Florence, and the convent at Lucca were established. Meanwhile, although the Servites had the approval of their immediate superiors, they had not been recognized by the Holy See. It was only in 1259 that the order was practically recognized by Alexander IV, and not until 1304 over sixty years after its foundation-that it received the explicit and formal approbation of Bd. Benedict XI. St. Bonfilius had remained as prior general until 1256, when he begged to be relieved owing to old age. He died on new year's night, 1261.
St. Buonagiunta, the youngest of the seven, was the second prior general, but not long after his election he breathed his last in chapel while the gospel of the Passion was being read. St. Amadeus ruled over the important convent of Carfaggio, but returned to Monte Senario to end his days. St. Manettus became fourth prior general and sent missionaries to Asia, but he retired to make way for St. Philip Benizi, upon whose breast he died. St. Hugh and St. Sostenes went abroad—Sostenes to Paris and Hugh to found convents in Germany. They were recalled in 1276, and, being attacked by illness, they passed away side by side the same night. St. Alexis, the humble lay-brother outlived them all, and he was the only one who survived to see the order fully and finally recognized. He is reported to have died at the age one hundred and ten.


SOURCE:Ewtn

LIVE #PopeFrancis at Holy Mass in Mexico - #PapaenMex - FULL Video - Text


Pope Francis in Mexico: Holy Mass with priests, men and women religious, consecrated people and seminarians - FULL TEXT Homily - 
 There is a saying which goes “tell me how you pray, and I will tell you how you live; tell me how you live and I will tell you how you pray. Because showing me how you pray, I will learn to find the God for whom you live, and showing me how you live, I will learn to believe in the God to whom you pray”. For our life speaks of prayer and prayer speaks of our life; our life speaks through our prayer and our prayer speaks through our life. Praying is something learned, just as we learn to walk, to speak, to listen. The school of prayer is the school of life and in the school of life we progress in the school of prayer.
Jesus wished to introduce his companions into the mystery of Life, into the mystery of His life. He showed them by eating, sleeping, curing, preaching and praying, what it means to be Son of God. He invited them to share his life, his interiority, and in his presence among them he allowed them to touch, in his flesh, the life of the Father. He helped them to experience, in his gaze, in his going out in power, the newness of saying “Our Father”. In Jesus this expression has no trace of routine or mere repetition. On the contrary, it contains a sense of life, of experience, of authenticity. With these two words, “Our Father”, he knew how to live praying and to pray living.
Jesus invites us to do the same. Our first call is to experience this merciful love of the Father in our lives, in our experiences. His first call is to introduce us into the new dynamic of love, of sonship. Our first calling is to learn to say, “Our Father”, that is, Abba.
“Woe to me if I do not preach the Gospel!”, says Saint Paul, “Woe to me!”. For to evangelize, he continues, is not a cause for glory but rather a need (1 Cor 9:16).
He has invited us to share in his life, his divine life, and woe to us if we do not share it, woe to us if we are not witnesses to what we have seen and heard, woe to us. We are not and do not want to be “administrators of the divine”, we are not and do not want to be God’s employees, for we are invited to share in his life, we are invited to enter into his heart, a heart that prays and lives, saying, “Our Father”. What is our purpose if not to say with our lives, “Our Father”?
He who is Our Father, it is he to whom we pray every day with insistence: Lead us not into temptation. Jesus himself did the same thing. He prayed that his disciples – yesterday’s and today’s – would not fall into temptation. What could be one of the sins which besets us? What could be one of the temptations which springs up not only in contemplating reality but also in living it? What temptation can come to us from places often dominated by violence, corruption, drug trafficking, disregard for human dignity, and indifference in the face of suffering and vulnerability? What temptation might we suffer over and over again when faced with this reality which seems to have become a permanent system?
I think we can sum it up in a word, “resignation”. Faced with this reality, the devil can overcome us with one of his favourite weapons: resignation. A resignation which paralyzes us and prevents us not only from walking, but also from making the journey; a resignation which not only terrifies us, but which also entrenches us in our “sacristies” and false securities; a resignation which not only prevents us from proclaiming, but also inhibits our giving praise. A resignation which not only hinders our looking to the future, but also thwarts our desire to take risks and to change. And so, “Our Father, lead us not into temptation”.
How good it is for us to tap into our memories when we are tempted. How much it helps us to look at the “stuff” of which we are made. It did not all begin with us, nor will it all end with us, and so it does us good to look back at our past experiences which have brought us to where we are today.
And in this remembering, we cannot overlook someone who loved this place so much, who made himself a son of this land. We cannot overlook that person who could say of himself: “They took me from the tribunal and put me in charge of the priesthood for my sins. Me, useless and quite unable to carry out such a great undertaking; me, who didn’t know how to use an oar, they chose me to be the first Bishop of Michoacán” (Vasco Vázquez de Quiroga, Pastoral Letter, 1554).
With you, I would like to recall this evangelizer, first known as “the Spaniard who became an Indian”.
The situation of the Purhépechas Indians, whom he described as being “sold, humiliated, and homeless in marketplaces, picking up scraps of bread from the ground”, far from tempting him to listless resignation, succeeded in kindling his faith, strengthening his compassion and inspiring him to carry out plans that were a “breath of fresh air” in the midst of so much paralyzing injustice. The pain and suffering of his brothers and sisters became his prayer, and his prayer led to his response. Among the Indians, he was known as “Tata Vasco”, which in the Purhépechan language means, Father, dad, daddy…
It is to this prayer, to this expression, that Jesus calls us.
Father, dad, daddy… lead us not into the temptation of resignation, lead us not into the temptation of losing our memory, lead us not into the temptation of forgetting our elders who taught us by their lives to say, “Our Father”.
[Original text: Spanish] [Vatican-provided translation]
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