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Saturday, November 7, 2015

Catholic News World : Sat. November 7, 2015 - SHARE

 2015

Dominican Order Celebrates 800 years - List of Famous Dominicans and Brief History to SHARE


The Spanish priest Dominic de Guzmán started  the Order of Preachers in France. On November 7, in the mother church of St. Sabina in Rome, the Dominican Order will initiate a jubilee year commemorating the bull promulgated by Pope Honorius III in 1216 and 1217, that confirmed the founding of the Dominicans. Fr. Bruno Cadorè is the Master General of the Order and 86th successor of their founder. The Dominican Order now has 3,000 nuns in 209 monasteries; 6,000 brothers in 602 friaries; more than 40,000 apostolic sisters in more than 119 congregations and 150,000 lay-members. There are 130 saints, including many doctors of the Church; 4 popes; 75 cardinals; 150 archbishops and hundreds of bishops. Members of the order have the letters O.P., standing for Ordinis Praedicatorum, meaning of the Order of Preachers, after their names. Pope Pius XI stated that: The Rosary of Mary is the principle and foundation on which the very Order of Saint Dominic rests for making perfect the life of its members and obtaining the salvation of others.Histories of the Holy Rosary show Saint Dominic himself receiving the cord from the Blessed Virgin Mary. Our Lady of the Rosary is the title from the apparition to Saint Dominic in 1208 in the church of Prouille in which the Virgin Mary gave the Rosary to him. 
FAMOUS Dominicans
List of proclaimed saints from the Dominicans:
 Death of Peter of Verona (1206–1252) by Girolamo Savoldo, ca. 1530–35
Louis Bertrand (1526–1581), portrait by Francisco de Zurbarán, 1640
Francisco Coll Guitart (1812–1875)
St. Dominic (d. 1221)
St. Peter Martyr (d. 1252)
St. Zedislava Berkiana (d. 1252)
St. Hyacinth (d. 1257)
St. Margaret of Hungary (d. 1271)
St. Thomas Aquinas (d. 1274)
St. Raymond of Peñafort (d. 1275)
St. Albert the Great (d. 1280)
St. Agnes of Montepulciano (d. 1317)
St. Catherine of Siena (d. 1380)
St. Vincent Ferrer (d. 1419)
St. Antoninus (d. 1459)
Pope St. Pius V (d. 1572)
St. Louis Bertrand (d. 1581)
St. Catherine de Ricci (d. 1590)
St. John of Cologne (d. 1600)
St. Rose of Lima (d. 1617)
St. Domingo Ibáñez de Erquicia (d. 1633)
St. Lorenzo Ruiz (d. 1637)
St. Martin de Porres (d. 1639)
St. John Macias (d. 1645)
Thomasian Martyrs (Asia and Spain, 17th and 18th centuries)
St. Louis de Montfort (d. 1716)
St. Francisco Coll Guitart (d. 1875)
St. Thomas Khoung (d. 1600+)
Numerous Dominicans were included in the canonization of the 117 martyrs of Vietnam and a group of martyrs in Nagasaki, including St. Lorenzo Ruiz.
Beatified Dominicans:
Blessed Jordan of Saxony
Blessed Mannes de Guzman, Brother of St. Dominic de Guzman
Blessed Alanus dela Rupe
Blessed Peter González
Blessed Margaret of Castello
Blessed Sadok and 48 Dominican martyrs from Sandomierz
Blessed Ceslaus,
Blessed Pier Giorgio Frassati
Blessed Henry Suso
Blessed Fra Angelico
Pope Blessed Innocent V
Pope Blessed Benedict XI
Blessed Robert Nutter, English Reformation martyr
Blessed Reginald of Orleans
Blessed Jan Franciszek Czartoryski
Blessed Gonçalo de Amarante, priest and hermit
Blessed Joan of Aza, mother of St. Dominic de Guzmán
Blessed Giuseppe Girotti
Blessed Bartolo Longo
Blessed Imelda Lambertini
Blessed Catherine of Racconigi
Blessed Lucy Brocadelli
Blessed Jordan of Pisa
Blessed Adrian Fortescue (martyr) Blessed Columba of Rieti Blessed Stephana de Quinzanis
Blessed Osanna of Mantua
Blessed Osanna of Cattaro
Blessed Anthony Neyrot
Blessed Margaret of Castello
Blessed John of Vercelli
Blessed Margaret of Savoy
Four Dominican friars have served as Bishop of Rome:
Pope Innocent V
Pope Benedict XI
Pope St. Pius V
Pope Benedict XIII
As of 2014, there are three Dominicans in the College of Cardinals:
Georges Marie Martin Cardinal Cottier
Christoph Cardinal Schönborn Austrian Archbishop of Vienna
Dominik Duka, Czech Archbishop of Prague
Other notable Dominicans include:
Gabriel Barletta
Matteo Bandello
Frei Betto, (1944) Brazilian friar, theologian, political activist and former government adviser
Meister Eckhart (c.1260-c.1328) German mystic and preacher
Giordano Bruno (1548-1600),
Anne Buttimer, University College Dublin
Oliviero Carafa
Brian Davies (Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University; former Regent of Blackfriars, Oxford)
Francisco de Vitoria (one of the founders of International Law)
Bartolomé de las Casas (1484-1566) Spanish bishop in the West, Protector of the Indians
Nicholas Eymerich
Marie-Dominique Chenu (1895-1990) French theologian of the Nouvelle Théologie
Yves Congar (1904-1995) French theologian of the Nouvelle Théologie, later cardinal
Bernard Gui (1261-1331) French bishop and inquisitor of the Cathars
Jean Jérôme Hamer (1916-1996) Belgian theologian and Curia official, cardinal
Henrik Kalteisen, the 24th Archbishop of Nidaros
Heinrich Kramer (1430-1505) German author of the Malleus Maleficarum (Hammer of Witches),
Dominique Pire (George) (1910-1969) Nobel Peace Prize
Vincent McNabb (1868-1943) Anglo-Irish scholar, apologist and ecumenist
Timothy Radcliffe (1945) 85th Master of the Order of Preachers
Girolamo Savonarola (1452-1498) Italian pre-reformation theologian, dictatorial ruler of Florentine Republic, burned by the Inquisition Edward Schillebeeckx (1914-1998) Belgian theologian
Johann Tetzel
Tomás de Torquemada (1420-1498) Spanish theologian, Grand-Inquisitor,
Gustavo Gutierrez (1928) Peruvian liberation theologian
Herbert McCabe (1926-2001) English theologian and scholar
Jeanine Deckers, "The Singing Nun" (1933-1985) shortly famous Belgian nun and chanson singer;

Wow Actress Leah Remini Converts back to the #Catholic Faith from Scientology

Leah Remini an actress from "King of Queens", "Saved by the Bell" and other roles publicly renounced her former religion of Scientology in 2013. She was part of the Church of Scientology for over three decades from the age of 9, when her mother converted.  Leah Remini has now professed her adherence to the Catholic Faith saying, "Nobody is asking me for money. Nobody is demanding that I come," which she told People Magazine. "I light a candle. I sit and I listen" said Remini, now 45. She just released a book entitled "Troublemaker: Surviving Hollywood and Scientology" about her troubles with this religion. However, she was baptized Catholic and learned about the religion from her Sicilian grandmother. In September her daughter Sofia, 11, was also baptized Catholic as seen in the picture above. "A very special day for our little girl and her Godparents,” Remini wrote on her Instagram account with the hashtags #baptism #catholic #newbeginnings. Remini's husband, Angelo Pagán, also tweeted "For the record @leahremini and I have always been Catholic ! Why we waited so long to baptize Sofia ! Hmmm….anyway it was a beautiful experience and our little angel is on her way to a more spiritual existence. God Bless" Remini explained that she gave nearly $5 million to the Church of Scientology over her 35 years in the religion. Remini, says she now finds peace at the Catholic church "by myself, sitting and praying and doing my rosary." "Sometimes I don't do anything," she continues. "To me it's what religion is supposed to be: a beautiful thing."

#PopeFrancis meets with Nobel Peace Prize Winners calling them "architects of peace"

Pope Francis meets with 2015 Nobel Peace Prize winners, representing the Tunisian National Dialogue Quartet - OSS_ROM
Pope Francis meets with 2015 Nobel Peace Prize winners, representing the Tunisian National Dialogue Quartet - OSS_ROM
07/11/2015 14:
(Vatican Radio) Pope Francis met privately with the 2015 Nobel Peace Prize winners on Saturday, calling them “architects of peace.”
The 2015 Prize went to Tunisian National Dialogue Quartet, for what the Nobel Committee  called "its decisive contribution to the building of a pluralistic democracy in Tunisia in the wake of the Jasmine Revolution of 2011."
Pope Francis met for 15 minutes with Mohamed Fadhel Mahfoudh, Abdessatar Ben Moussa, Wided Bouchamaoui, and Houcine Abbassi on Saturday morning.
The four represented the Tunisian General Labour Union; the Tunisian Confederation of Industry, Trade and Handicrafts; the Tunisian Human Rights League, and the Tunisian Order of Lawyers. The four organizations helped to establish a new constitution and presidential elections last year after a series of political assassinations in 2013.
During the meeting, Pope Francis said they accomplished their work “with their hands and their hearts,” and praised the methodology they used for dialogue and bringing stability to Tunisia.
The Nobel Laureates, for their part, thanked Pope Francis for receiving them, and called him a “true man of peace.” The gave the Pope a portrait of Mahatma Gandhi.

Today's Mass Readings and Video : Sat. November 7, 2015

Saturday of the Thirty-first Week in Ordinary Time
Lectionary: 490


Reading 1ROM 16:3-9, 16, 22-27

Brothers and sisters:
Greet Prisca and Aquila, my co-workers in Christ Jesus,
who risked their necks for my life,
to whom not only I am grateful but also all the churches of the Gentiles;
greet also the Church at their house.
Greet my beloved Epaenetus,
who was the firstfruits in Asia for Christ.
Greet Mary, who has worked hard for you.
Greet Andronicus and Junia,
my relatives and my fellow prisoners;
they are prominent among the Apostles
and they were in Christ before me.
Greet Ampliatus, my beloved in the Lord.
Greet Urbanus, our co-worker in Christ,
and my beloved Stachys.
Greet one another with a holy kiss.
All the churches of Christ greet you.

I, Tertius, the writer of this letter, greet you in the Lord.
Gaius, who is host to me and to the whole Church, greets you.
Erastus, the city treasurer,
and our brother Quartus greet you.

Now to him who can strengthen you,
according to my Gospel and the proclamation of Jesus Christ,
according to the revelation of the mystery kept secret for long ages
but now manifested through the prophetic writings and,
according to the command of the eternal God,
made known to all nations to bring about the obedience of faith,
to the only wise God, through Jesus Christ
be glory forever and ever. Amen.

Responsorial PsalmPS 145:2-3, 4-5, 10-11

R. (1b) I will praise your name for ever, Lord.
Every day will I bless you,
and I will praise your name forever and ever.
Great is the LORD and highly to be praised;
his greatness is unsearchable.
R. I will praise your name for ever, Lord.
Generation after generation praises your works
and proclaims your might.
They speak of the splendor of your glorious majesty
and tell of your wondrous works.
R. I will praise your name for ever, Lord.
Let all your works give you thanks, O LORD,
and let your faithful ones bless you.
Let them discourse of the glory of your Kingdom
and speak of your might.
R. I will praise your name for ever, Lord.

Alleluia2 COR 8:9

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
Jesus Christ became poor although he was rich,
so that by his poverty you might become rich.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

GospelLK 16:9-15

Jesus said to his disciples:
“I tell you, make friends for yourselves with dishonest wealth,
so that when it fails, you will be welcomed into eternal dwellings.
The person who is trustworthy in very small matters
is also trustworthy in great ones;
and the person who is dishonest in very small matters
is also dishonest in great ones.
If, therefore, you are not trustworthy with dishonest wealth,
who will trust you with true wealth?
If you are not trustworthy with what belongs to another,
who will give you what is yours?
No servant can serve two masters.
He will either hate one and love the other,
or be devoted to one and despise the other.
You cannot serve God and mammon.”

The Pharisees, who loved money,
heard all these things and sneered at him.
And he said to them,
“You justify yourselves in the sight of others,
but God knows your hearts;
for what is of human esteem is an abomination in the sight of God.”

Saint November 7 : St. Willibrord : Bishop : Patron of #Convulsions; #Epilepsy; #Netherlands

St. Willibrord

CONFESSOR, FIRST BISHOP OF UTRECHT
Feast: November 7
Information:
Feast Day:
November 7
Born:
658, Northumbria
Died:
November 7, 739
Major Shrine:
Echternach
Patron of:
convulsions; epilepsy; epileptics; Luxembourg; Netherlands

From his life, written by Alcuin, in two books, the one in prose, the other in verse, together with a homily, and an elegant poem in his honour. Also Bede, l. 5, Hist. c. 11, 12, and St. Boniface, ep. 97. See Batavia Sacra, p. 36, and Mabillon. Annal. Bened. t. 1, l. 18, sec. 4, and Acta Sanct. Ord. S. Bened. Sæc. 3, part 1, p. 601. Calmet, Hist. de Lorraine, t. 3, pr. et t. 1, app. Fabricius, Salutar. Luce Evang. c. 19, p. 442. A.D. 738.
ST. WILLIBRORD was born in the kingdom of Northumberland, towards the year 658, and placed by his virtuous parents, before he was seven years old, in the monastery of Rippon, which was at that time governed by St. Wilfrid, its founder. Wilgis, our saint’s father, retired also into a monastery, afterwards became a hermit, and in his old age founded and governed a small monastery between the ocean and the Humber. He is honoured among the saints in the monastery of Epternac, and in the English calendars. Alcuin has left us an account of his life Willibrord, by carrying the yoke of our Lord with fervour from his infancy, found it always easy and sweet, and the better to preserve the first fruits which he had gathered, made his monastic profession when he was very young. He had made great progress in virtue and sacred learning, when, out of a desire for further improvement, in the twentieth year of his age, he went over into Ireland, with the consent of his abbot and brethren, where he joined St. Egbert or Ecgbright, and the blessed Wigbert, who were gone thither before upon the same errand. In their company our saint spent twelve years in the study of the sacred sciences, and in the most fervent exercise of all virtues. Though his constitution was weak, in fervour and exactness, he outdid the most advanced; he was humble, modest, and of an easy obliging temper; and his whole conduct was regular and uniform. St. Egbert had long entertained an ardent desire of going to preach the gospel to the inhabitants of those unhappy countries, in which barbarism and idolatry still reigned without control, and he had chiefly Friesland or Lower Germany in his eye. But he was diverted from that apostolical design by persons of piety and authority, who engaged him to employ his zealous labours in the islands between Ireland and Scotland, in all which he settled the true manner of celebrating Easter; especially at Hij, where he died a little before Bede wrote his history. St. Egbert is honoured in the English Calendar on the 24th of April. Bede gives a most edifying account of his austere penance, devotion, zeal, and charity. His companion, the holy priest Wigbert, went in the mean time to Friesland; but after staying there two years came back without having met with any prospect of success. This disappointment did not discourage Egbert, and other zealous promoters of this mission; but excited them the more earnestly to solicit the divine mercy with prayers and tears in favour of so many souls, who were perishing eternally. Willibrord, who was then about thirty-one years of age, and had been ordained priest a year before, expressed a great desire to be allowed by his superiors to undertake this laborious and dangerous charge. St. Egbert, by the known zeal and great talents of our saint, and by his cheerfulness, which sufficiently showed him prepared to encounter all difficulties in the prosecution of such a work, doubted not but God had reserved to him the conversion of that nation, and encouraged him in this zealous design. St. Willibrord was joined by St. Swidbert and ten other English monks in this mission. 1 The Frisons, who had formerly occupied a large tract of country on the coasts of the German ocean, crossing the Rhine into Belgic Gaul, had possessed themselves of those provinces about the mouth of the Rhine, which the Catti, who were also originally Germans, then held. 1 Among all the German nations none maintained their liberty against the Romans, with greater success and courage, than the Frisons. Procopius tells us, 2 that some of them came into Britain with the English Saxons: and by their situation they were doubtless the most expert in maritime affairs. St. Ludger 3 mentions that Swidbert, and the rest of these zealous preachers, were desirous to carry the light of the faith to these people, because their ancestors sprang from them. St. Eligius, bishop of Noyon, had preached in part of Friesland, and St. Wilfrid had sown there the seeds of our holy faith in 678. But these seem to have been almost rooted out 4 before St. Willibrord’s arrival in 690 or 691. The authors of Batavia Sacra 5 doubt not but our twelve missionaries landed at Catwic upon the sea, which was at the mouth of the Rhine before it was blocked up with sands, and thither the English were accustomed to export corn, even from the north coasting part of their island; the British tower, as it was called, was built by the Romans at Catwic to defend this harbour. 6 This old channel was not entirely obstructed in 1050, as appears from the Chronicle of Woerden. 7 And Alcuin expressly says, that these missionaries landed at the mouth of the Rhine, and travelled thence to Utrecht, a town built by the Romans at the great passage over the Rhine; whence it was called Trajectum, afterwards Trecht, and lastly Utrecht, (from Outrecht, the Old Passage, and Ultrajectum, or Passage at the town Vulta,) to distinguish it from the ancient town of Maestricht or Passage over the Maese. Pepin of Herstal, or the Big, who was at that time duke of the French, and mayor of the king’s palace, and had lately conquered part of Friesland, received courteously St. Willibrord and his companions. But Willibrord set out for Rome, and cast himself at the feet of Pope Sergius, begging his apostolic blessing and authority to preach the gospel to idolatrous nations. The pope, charmed with his zeal and sanctity, granted him the most ample licenses for that purpose, and gave him a great quantity of relics for the consecration of churches. With this treasure the saint returned with all possible expedition to his province, considering the pressing necessities and dangers of so many souls which called for his compassion and relief. St. Swibert was taken from him and ordained bishop of the Borroctuarians, who seemed to have inhabited the territory of Berg, and the neighbouring country towards Cologne.
St. Willibrord, with his ten other companions, under the protection of Pepin, preached the gospel with wonderful success, in that part of Friesland that had been conquered by the French; so that after six years, Pepin, by the advice of his bishops, sent the saint to Rome, with strong letters of recommendation, that he might be ordained bishop. His humility made him endeavour that some other should be pitched upon for that dignity; but he was not heard. Pope Sergius, who still sat in St. Peter’s chair, received him with great marks of honour, changed his name into that of Clement, with great solemnity ordained him archbishop of the Frisons in St. Peter’s church, and gave him the pallium with authority to fix his see in what part of the country he should think most convenient. The holy man staid only fourteen days in Rome, being impatient to return to his flock, and regretting an hour’s absence from them, more than was necessary to procure them greater advantages. He came back to Utrecht the same year, 696, and chose that city for his residence, Pepin having bestowed on him the royal castle of Viltaburg, which, as Bede assures us, 8 was at Utrecht, though Cluverius will have it to have been the present Wiltenburg, three miles and a half from Utrecht; but this town itself was called Vulta, or the city of the Vultæ. 9 St. Willibrord built at Utrecht the church of our Saviour, in which he fixed his metropolitical see, says St. Boniface, 10 and that of St. Martin, though this latter he only restored, for it had been a church, but destroyed by the Pagans. 11 Heda and Beka think it had been built by king Dagobert, at the desire of St. Wilfrid. This latter church became afterwards the cathedral, and both were served by colleges of canons. The archbishop’s indefatigable application to the conversion of souls seemed to prove, that with the new obligation he had received at his consecration, of labouring to enlarge the kingdom of his Divine Master, he had acquired fresh strength and a considerable augmentation of his zeal. In the second year after his episcopal consecration, assisted by the liberality of Pepin, and the abbess Irmina, who is said to have been daughter of Dagobert II., he founded, in 698, the abbey of Epternac, in the diocess of Triers, and now in the duchy of Luxemburg, 12 which he governed to his death. Alcuin relates, that the nunnery of Horrea, of which Irmina was abbess, had been delivered from a pestilence by water, blessed by St. Willibrord, and by his saying mass in the church. Pepin of Herstal, before his death put away his concubine, Alpais, by whom he had Charles Martel, and was reconciled to his wife Plectrudis, and in his last will, which is signed by Plectrudis, he recommended to St. Willibrord, his nephews, (without any mention of his natural son Charles,) and bestowed on our saint the village of Swestram, now Susteren, in the duchy of Juliers, near the Mews, with which the holy man endowed a nunnery which he built there. 13 3 Pepin of Herstal died in December, 714. A little before his death, Charles Martel’s son, Pepin the Short, afterwards king of France, was born, and baptized by St. Willibrord, who on that occasion is related by Alcuin to have prophesied, that the child would surpass in glory all his ancestors. Charles Martel in a short time became mayor of the palace, and approved himself equally the first general and statesman of his age. In 723, he settled upon the monastery which St. Willibrord had erected at Utrecht to serve his cathedral, all the royal revenues belonging to his castle there. 14 Of this monastery St. Gregory was afterwards abbot; in succeeding times it was secularized. Several other donations of estates made by Charles Martel to several churches founded by our saint, may be seen in Miræus and others. By a charter, that prince conferred on him the royalties of the city of Utrecht with its dependencies and appurtenances. 15 By such establishments our saint sought to perpetuate the work of God. Not content to have planted the faith in the country which the French had conquered, he extended his labours into West-Friesland, which obeyed Radbod, prince or king of the Frisons, who continued an obstinate idolater; yet hindered not the saint’s preaching to his subjects, and he himself sometimes listened to him. The new apostle penetrated also into Denmark: but Ongend, (perhaps Biorn,) who then reigned there, a monster of cruelty rather than a man, was hardened in his malice, and his example had a great influence over his subjects. The man of God, however, for the first fruits of this country, purchased thirty young Danish boys, whom he instructed, baptized, and brought back with him. In his return he was driven by stress of weather upon the famous pagan island, called Fositeland, now Amelandt, on the coast of Friesland, six leagues from Leuwarden, to the north, a place then esteemed by the Danes and Frisons as most sacred in honour of the idol Fosite. It was looked upon as an unpardonable sacrilege, for any one to kill any living creature in that island, to eat of any thing that grew in it, or to draw water out of a spring there without observing the strictest silence. St. Willibrord, to undeceive the inhabitants, killed some of the beasts for his companions to eat, and baptized three persons in the fountain, pronouncing the words aloud. The idolaters expected to see them run mad or drop down dead: and seeing no such judgment befal them, could not determine whether this was to be attributed to the patience of their god, or to his want of power. They informed Radbod, who, transported with rage, ordered lots to be cast three times a day, for three days together, and the fate of the delinquents to be determined by them. God so directed it that the lot never fell upon Willibrord; but one of his company was sacrificed to the superstition of the people, and died a martyr for Jesus Christ. 4
The saint, upon leaving Amelandt, directed his course to Warckeren, one of the chief islands belonging to Zealand. His charity and patience made considerable conquests to the Christian religion there, and he established several churches. After the death of Radbod, which happened in 719, Willibrord was at full liberty to preach in every part of the country. He was joined in his apostolical labours, in 720, by St. Boniface, who spent three years in Friesland: then went into Germany. Bede says, when he wrote his history in 731, “Willibrord, surnamed Clement, is still living, venerable for his old age, having been bishop thirty-six years, and sighing after the rewards of the heavenly life, after many conflicts in the heavenly warfare.” 16 He was, says Alcuin, of a becoming stature, venerable in his aspect, comely in his person, graceful and always cheerful in his speech and countenance, wise in his counsel, unwearied in preaching and all apostolic functions, amidst which he was careful to nourish the interior life of his soul by assiduous prayer, singing of psalms, watching, and fasting. Alcuin, who wrote about fifty years after his death, assures us, that this apostle was endowed with the gift of miracles, and relates, that whilst he preached in the isle of Warckeren, where the towns of Flessingue and Middleburg are since built, going from village to village, he found in one of them a famous idol to which the people were offering their vows and sacrifices, and full of holy zeal threw it down, and broke it in pieces. In the mean time an idolater, who was the priest and guardian of the idol, gave him a blow on the head with his backsword, with which, nevertheless, the saint was not hurt: and he would not suffer the assassin to be touched, or prosecuted. But the unhappy man was soon after possessed with a devil, and lost his senses. By the tears, prayers, and zealous labours of this apostle and his colleagues, the faith was planted in most parts of Holland, Zealand, and all the remaining part of the Netherlands, whither St. Amand and St. Lebwin had never penetrated; and the Frisons, till then a rough and most barbarous people, were civilized, and became eminent for virtue, and the culture of arts and sciences. St. Wulfran, archbishop of Sens, and others, excited by the success of our saint’s missions, were ambitious to share in so great a work under his direction. St. Willibrord was exceedingly cautious in admitting persons to holy orders, fearing lest one unworthy or slothful minister should defeat by scandal, all the good which the divine mercy had begun for the salvation of many souls. It is also mentioned of him, that he was very strict and diligent in examining and preparing thoroughly those whom he admitted to baptism, dreading the condemnation which those incur, who, by sloth or facility, open a door to the profanation of our most tremendous mysteries. The schools which St. Willibrord left at Utrecht, were very famous. 17 Being at length quite broken with old age he resigned the administration of his diocess to a coadjutor whom he ordained bishop, 18 and in retirement prepared himself for eternity. He died, according to Pagi, in 739; according to Mabillon, in 740 or 741, and according to Mr. Smith, 19 in 745, some adhering to Alcuin, others to Bede, &c. St. Boniface says, that St. Willibrord spent fifty years in preaching the gospel, 20 which Mr. Smith dates from his episcopal consecration; Mabillon, 21 from his coming into Friesland: but others think these fifty years mean only thereabouts. For Alcuin says, he came into Friesland in the thirty-third year of his age, and lived eighty-one years; which account only allows him forty-eight years employed in preaching. But, if St. Boniface comprises the two years in which he preached in Ireland, and the Scottish islands, his Chronology agrees with Alcuin’s dates, and it follows that St. Willibrord died in 738: which is confirmed by the Chronicle of Epternac, compiled from the Necrology and manuscript registers of that monastery. Alcuin and Rabanus Maurus place his death on the 6th of November: but the Chronicle of Epternac, Usuard, Ado, and the Roman and Benedictin Martyrologies commemorate him on the 7th. He was buried, as he had desired, at his monastery of Epternac, and his relics are there enshrined at this day. The portative altar which he made use of for the celebration of the divine mysteries, in travelling through Friesland, Zealand, and Holland, is kept in the Benedictin abbey of our Lady ad martyres, at Triers. 22 St. Willibrord’s Testament in favour of his monastery of Epternac was published by F. Ch. Scribanius, S. J. in his Antwerp, by Miræus, 23 with notes by Boschart; and by Calmet, among the proofs of his History of Lorrain. 24 From Live of the Saints by Butler
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