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Thursday, January 22, 2015

Catholic News World : Thursday January 22, 2015 - Share!

2015


1. “The right to life is the first human right. Abortion is killing someone that cannot defend him or herself.” – Cardinal Bergoglio with Rabbi Abraham Skorka in book
 2. “All life has inestimable value even the weakest and most vulnerable, the sick, the old, the unborn and the poor, are masterpieces of God’s creation, made in his own image, destined to live forever, and deserving of the utmost reverence and respect.” – Message to Catholics taking part in annual Day for Life in Britain and Ireland July 28, 2013
3. “Let’s say ‘Yes’ to life and ‘No’ to death.” – Message to Catholics taking part in March for Life in France Jan. 19, 2014
 4. “Every child who, rather than being born, is condemned unjustly to being aborted, bears the face of Jesus Christ, bears the face of the Lord, who even before he was born, and then just after birth, experienced the world’s rejection. And every elderly person…even if he is ill or at the end of his days, bears the face of Christ. They cannot be discarded, as the ‘culture of waste’ suggests!” – Speech to Catholic healthcare professionals and gynecologists Sept. 20, 2013
5.... it is frightful even to think there are children, victims of abortion, who will never see the light of day; children being used as soldiers, abused and killed in armed conflicts; and children being bought and sold in that terrible form of modern slavery which is human trafficking, which is a crime against humanity.” – Speech to diplomats Jan. 13, 2014
 6. “The victims of this [throwaway] culture are precisely the weakest and most fragile human beings — the unborn, the poorest, the sick and elderly, the seriously handicapped, etc. — who are in danger of being ‘thrown away,’ expelled from a system that must be efficient at all costs. …It is necessary to raise awareness and form the lay faithful, in whatever state, especially those engaged in the field of politics, so that they may think in accord with the Gospel and the social doctrine of the church and act consistently by dialoguing and collaborating with those who, in sincerity and intellectual honesty, share — if not the faith — at least a similar vision of mankind and society and its ethical consequences. – Speech to a delegation from the Dignitatis Humanae Institute Dec. 7, 2013
7. “We are called to reach out to those who find themselves in the existential peripheries of our societies and to show particular solidarity with the most vulnerable of our brothers and sisters: the poor, the disabled, the unborn and the sick, migrants and refugees, the elderly and the young who lack employment.” – Message to the 10th General Assembly of the World Council of Churches dated Oct. 4, 2013
8. On the church supporting life: “This young woman had the courage” to carry her baby to term and not have an abortion, Pope Francis said. But this example of an unmarried woman who sought baptism for her baby, “what does she find? A closed door. And this happens to a lot of people. This is not good pastoral zeal. This pushes people away from the Lord.” – Homily during morning Mass May 25, 2013 in chapel of his residence
9. The fight against abortion is “part of the battle in favor of life from the moment of conception until a dignified, natural end. This includes the care of the mother during pregnancy, the existence of laws to protect the mother postpartum, and the need to ensure that children receive enough food, as well as providing healthcare throughout the whole length of life…” …On science being aware it is human life: “A pregnant woman isn’t carrying a toothbrush in her belly, or a tumor…We are in the presence of a human being.” – Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio in book of interviews “Pope Francis: His Life in His Own Words”
10. "Defend the Unborn Against Abortion even if they persecute you calumniate you set traps for you take you to court or kill you."

Hundreds of Thousands at MARCH FOR LIFE - Washington DC - USA - 57,762,169 Abortions since 1973

HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS attended the MARCH FOR LIFE in Washington, DC on January 22, 2015. The great crowds marked the 42th anniversary of Roe vs. Wade the decision in 1973 that permitted abortion. Even POPE FRANCIS tweeted in support. His tweet from 2014 was in English and Spanish, “I join the March for Life in Washington with my prayers. May God help us respect all life, especially the most vulnerable”. This year he tweeted "Every Life is a Gift". 
57,762,169 Abortions have occurred in America Since Roe vs. Wade in 1973.  The United States remembers today 42 years of legalized abortion in all fifty states at any time for any reason throughout pregnancy on January 22nd, the anniversary of the Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision.  This massive crowd gathered to honor life from conception to natural death. It is hoped that the legislation will soon be changed to end abortion in the US. (IMAGE SOURCE : GOOGLE)
 There was an overnight prayer vigil in the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception with thousands in attendance. Cardinal Sean O'Malley, six other cardinals, 44 bishops, 343 priests, 100 deacons, and 530 seminarians were present at the Mass in the Basilica. This annual March has become a large event spanning many days and involving talks, demonstrations, prayer, videos and other activities. Many politicians, clergy, religious, youth and leaders partake every year. Martin Luther King's niece Dr. Alveda King also attended and is part of a large movement in support of life. Last year over 650,000 attended. This year noted a particularly strong youth presence.
Catholic Bishops Conference Release: 
January 22 Day Of Prayer For The Legal Protection Of Unborn Children  The over 56 million abortions since the 1973 decisions of Roe v. Wade and Doe v. Bolton reflect with heartbreaking magnitude what Pope Francis means by a “throwaway culture.” However, we have great trust in God’s providence. We are reminded time and again in Scripture to seek the Lord’s help, and as people of faith, we believe that our prayers are heard. The General Instruction of the Roman Missal (GIRM), no. 373, designates January 22 as a particular day of prayer and penance, called the "Day of Prayer for the Legal Protection of Unborn Children”: “In all the Dioceses of the United States of America, January 22 (or January 23, when January 22 falls on a Sunday) shall be observed as a particular day of prayer for the full restoration of the legal guarantee of the right to life and of penance for violations to the dignity of the human person committed through acts of abortion.” As individuals, we are called to observe this day through the penitential practices of prayer, fasting and/or giving alms. Another way to take part is through participating in special events to observe the anniversary of Roe v. Wade. Call your local diocese or parish to find out what events might be taking place in your area.

#BreakingNews 2 Christian Teachers Raped and Killed by Army in Myanmar - Please PRAY

Burmese army rapes, tortures and kills two Christian Kachin teachers
(Image Source https://democracyforburma.wordpress.com by Francis Khoo Thwe
The violence took place in the village of Shabuk-Kaunghka, Shan State. In their 20s, the two teaching volunteers had come to the village to provide education to locals. Revenge for clashes between regular army units and rebels appears to be the reason for the incident. Burma's Churches condemn the crime, noting the work Christian volunteers do in the field of education.


Yangon (AsiaNews) - The Burmese army tortured, raped and killed two teaching volunteers from the Kachin Baptist Convention (KBC). The violence took place on Monday in the village of Shabuk-Kaunghka, Mungbaw Township, Shan State (northeastern Myanmar).
According to preliminary reports, troops from a Light Infantry battalion were responsible for the violence, which occurred after Burmese army units and local rebels recently clashed in Kachin State. Soldiers tortured and gang-raped the two Christian teaching volunteers before brutally killing them out of revenge.
The two victims, both in their 20s, hailed from the village of Wine Maw, in Kachin State, northern Myanmar, an area where thousands of people continue to flee violence, attacked because of their ethnicity.
Their bodies have been brought to Myitkyina, the capital of Kachin State, where their funeral is set for tomorrow led by the KBC, which had sent the two women to a remote area in ​​Shan State, to teach village children.
In many areas inhabited by ethnic minorities, there are few public school teachers. Christian associations, including Catholic ones, tend to fill the educational gap through relentless and tireless work of volunteers.
The Kachin Baptist community slammed the murder of its teachers, who sacrificed their lives to provide am education and a better life to people often forgotten by the authorities and the central government.
In a final farewell to the two young victims, hundreds of people gathered in prayer to honour their selfless work.
Meanwhile, local eyewitnesses said that the army has threatened people, warning them not to mention what happened or else their homes could be torched and destroyed.
On condition of anonymity, Kachin Christian sources told AsiaNews that Christian Churches have been involved in education in Burma "since the 19th century".
Christian Volunteers "have never refused to go into remote areas, among the most marginalised people," even when civil strife raged.
"Many sacrificed their lives for the mission," the sources said, "but never before had two teachers been raped and killed."
"Today local Churches suffered a great offence," they added, "and have to raise their voice and demand greater protection."  
Myanmar is home to more than 135 ethnic groups, who have always had to struggle to find a peaceful modus vivendi, especially with the central government, which is dominated by majority ethnic Burmese.
In the past, the country's military junta used an iron fist against the Shan and Kachin people, in their respective states, which are located on Myanmar's northern border with China.
The latest round of fighting broke out in June 2011 after 17 years of relative calm with dozens of civilians casualties and at least 200,000 people forcibly displaced.

Last August, local bishops made an appeal for peace, calling for a lasting solutionto the conflict.
Shared from ASIANEWSIT

Pope Francis "....a common ecumenical journey towards full, visible unity of the Christians." to Ecumenical Delegation


Pope Francis - AP
22/01/2015 12:00


(Vatican Radio)  Pope Francis told an ecumenical delegation from Finland Thursday that Catholics and Lutherans can do much together “to bear witness to God’s mercy.”  The delegation’s visit to Rome coincides with the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity and the Feast of St. Henry, the patron saint of Finland.
In his discourse to the Finnish delegates, Pope Francis applauded the progress achieved in ecumenical dialogue between the two Churches over the last thirty years and said, “a shared Christian witness is very much needed in the face of the mistrust, insecurity, persecution, pain and suffering experienced so widely in today’s world.”
Below, please find the text of Pope Francis’ discourse to the ecumenical delegation from Finland:
Dear Bishop Vikström, Dear Bishop Sippo, Dear Friends,
It is with joy that I welcome you, on the occasion of your annual ecumenical pilgrimage to Rome to celebrate the feast of Saint Henrik, the patron of your country.  This annual event has proven to be  a truly spiritual and ecumenical meeting between Catholics and Lutherans, a tradition dating back thirty years. 
Saint Pope John Paul II addressed the members of the first Finnish ecumenical delegation which had come to Rome thirty years ago in these words: “The fact that you come here together is itself a witness to the importance of efforts for unity.  The fact that you pray together is a witness to our belief that only through the grace of God can that unity be achieved.  The fact that you recite the Creed together is a witness to the one common faith of the whole of Christianity”.  At that time, the first important steps had already been taken on a common ecumenical journey towards full, visible unity of the Christians.  In these intervening years much has been done and, I am certain, will continue to be done in Finland to make “the partial communion existing between Christians grow toward full communion in truth and charity” (John Paul II, Ut Unum Sint, 14).
Your visit comes within the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity.  This year our reflection is based on Christ’s words to the Samaritan woman at the well: «Give me to drink» (Jn 4:1-42).  We are reminded that the source of all grace is the Lord himself, and that his gifts transform those who receive them, making them witnesses to the true life that is in him alone (cf. Jn 4:39).   As the Gospel tells us, many Samaritans believed in Jesus because of the woman’s testimony. As you, Bishop Vikstrom, have said, there is so much that Catholics and Lutherans can do together to bear witness to God’s mercy in our societies.  A shared Christian witness is very much needed in the face of the mistrust, insecurity, persecution, pain and suffering experienced so widely in today’s world.
 This common witness can be sustained and encouraged by progress in theological dialogue between the Churches.  The Joint Declaration on the Doctrine on Justification, which was solemnly signed some fifteen years ago between the Lutheran World Federation and the Catholic Church, can produce further fruits of reconciliation and cooperation between us.  The Nordic Lutheran–Catholic dialogue in Finland and Sweden,  under the related themeJustification in the Life of the Church, has been reflecting on important questions deriving from the Joint Declaration. Let us hope that further convergence will emerge from that dialogue on  the concept of the Church, the sign and instrument of the salvation brought to us in Jesus Christ.
It is my prayer that your visit to Rome will contribute to strengthening further the ecumenical relations between Lutherans and Catholics in Finland, which have been so positive for many years.  May the Lord send upon us the Spirit of truth, to guide us towards ever greater love and unity.

Today's Mass Readings : Thursday January 22, 2015


Day of Prayer for the Legal Protection of Unborn Children
Lectionary: 314


Reading 1HEB 7:25—8:6

Jesus is always able to save those who approach God through him,
since he lives forever to make intercession for them.

It was fitting that we should have such a high priest:
holy, innocent, undefiled, separated from sinners,
higher than the heavens.
He has no need, as did the high priests,
to offer sacrifice day after day,
first for his own sins and then for those of the people;
he did that once for all when he offered himself.
For the law appoints men subject to weakness to be high priests,
but the word of the oath, which was taken after the law,
appoints a son, who has been made perfect forever.

The main point of what has been said is this:
we have such a high priest,
who has taken his seat at the right hand of the throne
of the Majesty in heaven, a minister of the sanctuary
and of the true tabernacle that the Lord, not man, set up.
Now every high priest is appointed to offer gifts and sacrifices;
thus the necessity for this one also to have something to offer.
If then he were on earth, he would not be a priest,
since there are those who offer gifts according to the law.
They worship in a copy and shadow of the heavenly sanctuary,
as Moses was warned when he was about to erect the tabernacle.
For God says, “See that you make everything
according to the pattern shown you on the mountain.”
Now he has obtained so much more excellent a ministry
as he is mediator of a better covenant,
enacted on better promises.

Responsorial PsalmPS 40:7-8A, 8B-9, 10, 17

R. (8a and 9a) Here am I, Lord; I come to do your will.
Sacrifice or oblation you wished not,
but ears open to obedience you gave me.
Burnt offerings or sin-offerings you sought not;
then said I, “Behold I come.”
R. Here am I, Lord; I come to do your will.
“In the written scroll it is prescribed for me,
To do your will, O my God, is my delight,
and your law is within my heart!”
R. Here am I, Lord; I come to do your will.
I announced your justice in the vast assembly;
I did not restrain my lips, as you, O LORD, know.
R. Here am I, Lord; I come to do your will.
May all who seek you
exult and be glad in you,
And may those who love your salvation
say ever, “The LORD be glorified.”
R. Here am I, Lord; I come to do your will.

AlleluiaSEE 2 TM 1:10

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
Our Savior Jesus Christ has destroyed death
and brought life to light through the Gospel.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

GospelMK 3:7-12

Jesus withdrew toward the sea with his disciples.
A large number of people followed from Galilee and from Judea.
Hearing what he was doing,
a large number of people came to him also from Jerusalem,
from Idumea, from beyond the Jordan,
and from the neighborhood of Tyre and Sidon.
He told his disciples to have a boat ready for him because of the crowd,
so that they would not crush him.
He had cured many and, as a result, those who had diseases
were pressing upon him to touch him.
And whenever unclean spirits saw him they would fall down before him
and shout, “You are the Son of God.”
He warned them sternly not to make him known.

Pope Francis "...this is the most important thing, and this is the strength of our faith." Homily

Pope Francis at Mass - OSS_ROM
22/01/2015 10:
(Vatican Radio) The most important thing is not the grace of a physical healing, but the fact that Jesus saves us and intercedes for us: this was the focus of Pope Francis’ remarks following the readings of the day at Mass on Thursday morning in the chapel of the Santa Marta residence in the Vatican.
Commenting on the Gospel of the day (Mark 3:7-12), which tells of great crowds rushing to Jesus from every region, Pope Francis said that the people of God see in the Lord “a hope, because His way of acting, teaching, touches their heart, reaches the heart, because it has the power of the Word of God”:
“The people feel this, and see that promises are fulfilled in Jesus, that in Jesus there is hope. The people were a bit bored by the way of teaching the faith, by the teachers of the Law of that time, who burdened the shoulders of the people with so many commandments, so many precepts, but did not come to people’s hearts. And when the people see Jesus and hear Jesus - His proposals, the Beatitudes – they feel something moving inside – it is the Holy Spirit that is causing people to stir – and they go to see Jesus.”
Purity of intention in seeking God
The crowd goes to Jesus to be healed: that is, they seek their own good. “Never,” said Pope Francis, “can we follow God with purity of intention right from the start: it is always a search undertaken a little for us, and a little for God – and the journey itself purifies this intention.” The Pope went on to say, “People go, yes, they look for God, but they also look for health, for healing – and they threw themselves upon Him to touch Him, that some power might go out of Him and heal them.”
Jesus saves
The most important thing, however, is not that Jesus healed. Those healings were a sign of another healing, the Holy Father explained. Nor is the fact that Jesus says words that reach the heart the most important thing – though that certainly helps to meet God. The most important thing is in the Letter to the Hebrews (7:25), where it is written, “Jesus is always able to save those who approach God through him, since he lives forever to make intercession for them.”:
“Jesus saves!” said Pope Francis. “These healings, these words that reach the heart, are the sign and the beginning of  salvation – the path of salvation for many who begin to go to hear Jesus or to ask for a healing and then come back to Him and feel salvation.” He went on to ask, “What, though, is most important? That Jesus heals? No, that is not the most important thing. That He teaches us? That is not the most important thing [either]. [The most important thing] is that He saves! He is the Savior and we are saved by him: this is the most important thing, and this is the strength of our faith.”
Jesus intercedes
Jesus ascended to the Father, “and from thence He continues to intercede, every day, every moment for us.”:
“This is relevant today. Jesus stands before the Father, offering His life – the redemption – He shows His wounds to the Father, the price of salvation – and so it is that every day, Jesus intercedes. When we, for one thing or the other, are feeling a little down, let us remember that it is He who prays for us, intercedes for us continually. So many times we forget this: ‘Jesus ... but yes, it’s finished, he’s gone to heaven, sent us the Holy Spirit, the story’s over.’ No! Even now, in every moment, Jesus intercedes. In this prayer: ‘Lord Jesus, only have mercy on me,’ He intercedes for me. Turn to the Lord, asking for this intercession.”
The “sensitivity” of the people of God
That Jesus is savior and intercessor is the central point, and we do well to remember this. “Thus, the crowd seeks Jesus with that instinctive sense of hope that is proper to the people of God, which was at that time awaiting the Messiah, and they look to find in Him health, truth, salvation, for He is the Savior and as Savior even now, at this moment, intercedes for us. That our Christian life might be ever more convinced that we are saved, that we have a Savior, Jesus at the right hand of the Father, interceding. May the Lord, the Holy Spirit, make us understand these things.”

Saint January 22 : St. Vincent Pallotti : Priest



Information:
Feast Day:January 22
Born:
1798 in Rome, Italy
Died:1850
Canonized:1963 by Pope John XXIII
A contemporary of Cardinal Newman's and the Cure of Ars', St. Vincent Pallotti was a very modern saint who organized so many remarkable pastoral programs that he is considered the forerunner of Catholic Action. He was a man of great ideas and great vision and was able to inspire others to tackle great things. He is the founder of the Pallottine Fathers and the Pallottine Missionary Sisters; however, this was but the tip of the iceberg of his accomplishments. He left behind schools, guilds, and institutes that carried the Catholic mission into the very heart of contemporary society.

He was born in Rome in 1795 and began studies for the priesthood very early. Although he was very bright, he was not attracted by studies, even though he was ordained a priest at twenty-three and earned a doctorate in theology soon afterward. He was given an assistant professorship at the Sapienza University but resigned it soon after to devote himself to pastoral work.

Before long, his zeal was known all over Rome. He organized schools for shoemakers, tailors, coachmen, carpenters, and gardeners so that they could better work at their trade, as well as evening classes for young farmers and unskilled workers. He soon became known as a "second St. Philip Neri." He gave away his books, his possessions, and even his clothes to the poor, and once dressed up as an old woman to hear the confession of a man who threatened "to kill the first priest who came through the door."
In 1835, he founded his two congregations and was instrumental in the founding of a missionary order in England and several colleges for the training of missionaries.
He died at the age of fifty-five and his body lies incorrupt in the church of San Salvatore in Rome. He was canonized by Pope John XXIII in 1963.



SOURCE: http://www.ewtn.com/saintsHoly/saints/V/stvincentpallotti.asp#ixzz1kBnVpJ3a


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