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Friday, June 20, 2014

Catholic News World : Friday June 20, 2014 - Share!

2014


Crowded Funeral of Fr. Kenneth Walker - Obituary - Westboro Church Decides to Picket

Pope Francis “It gives me great pain, to see that Christians around the world suffer the [lion’s share] of such discrimination.” Religious Liberty Conference

Wow Thousands at March for Marriage in Washington DC - Video - Full Text Archbishop Cordileone

Full Text Pope Francis "Drug addiction is an evil, and with evil there can be no yielding or compromise. "

Today's Mass Readings Online : Friday June 20, 2014

Saint June 20 : St. Silverius : Pope

The viewing for Rev. Kenneth Walker was Thursday at Piper Funeral Home in Saint Mary's and A rosary was recited at Sacred Heart Church. The funeral mass began at 11:00 a.m. Friday morning. He was buried at Mount Calvary Cemetery afterwards. The Funeral was crowded and there was standing only at the back.
Sadly, the Westboro Baptist Church decided to Picket this Funeral. This Anti-Catholic Church wrote the following on their Website: WBC will picket the funeral of Assistant Pastor Kenneth Walker doomed to reside in Hell eternity after a life spent as part of the Catholic Pedophile Machine. From a young age, Walker was indoctrinated into the Priests Rape Boys religion propagated by the Catholics. As an adult, he willingly participated in furthering their satanic goals by joining a seminary and entering the priesthood.
For More Background on Fr. Walker and Fr. Terra Click:
http://jceworld.blogspot.ca/2014/06/fssp-priest-killed-in-rectory-rip-fr.html
http://jceworld.blogspot.ca/2014/06/funeral-for-fr-kenneth-walker-killed.html
Image from Funeral in Kansas held June 20, 2014:

Kenneth Walker

Obituary
  • "Requium aeternam dona ei, Domine. Et lux perpetua ei,..."
    - James Hawes

Rev. Kenneth Walker FSSP Rev. Kenneth Walker FSSP, 28, died Wednesday, June 11, 2014 in Phoenix, AZ., as a result of injuries he received in a break-in at the Mater Misericordia Parish Rectory in Phoenix. He was born September 13, 1985 at Poughkeepsie, NY, the son of Thomas Walker and Marypat Luber. He was baptized on October 13 of the same year at St. Mary's Church in Wappingers Falls, NY. During his high school years, his family discovered and began attending the Traditional Latin Mass. He was strongly influenced by both the Mass and the devotion of his family, and began considering a vocation to the priesthood. After high school, he attended Our Lady Seat of Wisdom, Barry's Bay, ON, pursuing a classical formation in liberal arts from the fall of 2003 until April 2005. After the influence of his parents, Fr. Walker always credited the College as being essential to his formation in the faith prior to entering the seminary. Fr. Walker was accepted to the Our Lady of Guadalupe Seminary, the Fraternity of St. Peter's International House of Formation for English speakers in Nebraska, in the fall of 2005, and began the normal course of studies and formation. His dedication to fulfilling the ideals with which he approached the priesthood was evident in his time in seminary. He performed very well academically, always receiving high marks in his courses. He immersed himself in the fullness of the program of formation, from the life of prayer and liturgy to recreation with other seminarians - especially in his love of playing soccer, a popular sport at the seminary. After completing the First Year of Spirituality, he was first incorporated into the FSSP, received the cassock, and received Tonsure from Bishop Alvaro Corrada, SJ, on October 6, 2006. After five more years of prayer, work, and study, Bishop Fabian Bruskewitz ordained him to the subdiaconate on January 29, 2011. He was permanently incorporated into the FSSP on March 18, and on the next day, March 19, 2011 - the feast of St. Joseph - he was ordained a deacon by Bishop Czeslaw Kozon of Copenhagen. As a deacon, he traveled to the Fraternity's other seminary in Wigratzbad, Germany for several months in order to complete further studies and gain the perspective of the Fraternity's international presence. He also assisted for a number of months at the Mater Misericordiae Mission of the FSSP in Phoenix, AZ. Interestingly, he performed his first Baptism on October 13, 2011 - the anniversary of his own Baptism. Returning to Nebraska in May of 2012, he made a retreat in preparation for his priestly ordination, the culmination of his seven years of studies and prayer life. On May 19, 2012, Kenneth Walker was ordained to the Holy Priesthood of Christ our Savior in Lincoln, Nebraska by Bishop Fabian Bruskewitz. He offered his first Mass at the Chapel of Sts. Peter and Paul at Our Lady of Guadalupe Seminary, and was assisted by Fr. John Berg, Superior General of the FSSP. He received his first priestly assignment that summer, returning to Mater Misericordiae in Phoenix as an assistant priest under Fr. Joseph Terra, FSSP. Survivors include his mother, Marypat Luber (George Green) and their daughter, Stephanie; his father, Thomas (Amy) Walker, siblings, Tavia (Jack) McGowan, Raul (Fawn) Contreras, Thomas (Theresa) Walker, Sasha (Thomas) Keys, Travis Contreras, Cassy (Luke) Harbin, Katie Contreras, Rosie (John Mark) Hoffman, Matthew (Mary) Contreras and Joseph Walker; 13 nieces and nephews; a grandmother Peggy Ann Smith; aunts and uncles, Mary (Steven) Dubuis, Peter Walker, Christopher (Megumi) Walker, Carol Walker, Barbara (Gary) Curtis, Patricia (Daniel) Lucari, James Walker, Jonathan Walker, Jack (Eileen) Luber, Bruce (Carol) Luber, Ann (Thomas) Dumbroski, Peter (Lisa) Luber; Robert (Patricia) Smith, Kathy Plumb, Nina (Robert) Wolfe, Penny (Brian) Menning, Mark Smith, Steven (Angela) Smith and Francis (Pam) Smith: numerous cousins. Requiem Mass will be at 11:00 A.M. Friday, June 20, 2014 at Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Newbury. Fr. Walker will lie in state on Thursday, June 19, 2014 from 2:00 until 5:00 P.M. at Piper Funeral Home in St. Marys. There will be a Rosary recited at 7:00 P.M. Thursday evening at Sacred Heart Church. Interment will be in Mt. Calvary Cemetery, St. Marys. Memorial contributions may be made in Fr. Walker's name and sent in care of Piper Funeral Home, 714 Maple St., St. Marys, Kansas 66536. Online condolences may be sent to www.piperfuneralhome.com. Rev. Kenneth Walker FSSPPublished in Topeka Capital-Journal on June 18, 2014
Full Video of the FSSP Requiem Mass for Fr. Kenneth

Pope Francis “It gives me great pain, to see that Christians around the world suffer the [lion’s share] of such discrimination.” Religious Liberty Conference


Pope Francis meets participants of Religious Freedom Conference
20/06/2014


(Vatican Radio) Pope Francis received the participants in an international conference exploring the theme: “International Religious Liberty and the Global Clash of Values. The Centers for Law and Religion and for International and Comparative Law at St. John's University and the Department of Law at the Libera Università Maria SS. Assunta (LUMSA)  are co-sponsors of the 2-day conference, which opened in Rome on Friday.
In remarks prepared for the occasion and delivered at the special audience, Pope Francis said that, despite the numerous expressions in favor of religious liberty, religious harassment, oppression and even persecution continue around the world, and are even on the increase, especially against Christians.
“It gives me great pain,” said Pope Francis, “to see that Christians around the world suffer the [lion’s share] of such discrimination.” The Holy Father went on to say, “The persecution of Christians today is even more virulent than in the first centuries of the Church, and there are more Christian martyrs today than in that era.”
The Holy Father’s remarks concluded with an expression of hope that the participants’ meeting, “might illustrate, with eminent scientific rigor and depth, the reasons that oblige every legal authority to respect and defend religious freedom.”
Shared from Radio Vaticana

Wow Thousands at March for Marriage in Washington DC - Video - Full Text Archbishop Cordileone

The 2nd annual March for Marriage in Washington DC  brought Thousands to the Hill. It was sponsored by various organizations most notably the National Organization for Marriage and the FRC. The main Speakers were Senator Rick Santorum and Governor Mike Huckabee, and San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone. Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D)  asked that he refrain from attending a march. The Archbishop said that Pope Francis supported the March. Archbishop Cordileones is the head of the U.S. bishops subcommittee for the promotion and defense of marriage. Father Shenan J. Boquet, President, Human Life International sent a letter saying, “We love our fellow citizens, our neighbors, enough to tell them the truth about what marriage is and why it’s important – even though some might find this truth hard to accept.”

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 Below is the Full Text Speech of Archbishop Cordileone: 
In our Catholic faith tradition, young people around the age of junior high school or high school receive the sacrament of Confirmation, normally administered by the bishop. At a Confirmation ceremony I celebrated recently in a large, Hispanic parish, two of the young people shared some reflections on what their Confirmation meant to them. They said that their Confirmation gave them the grace to go forth and “build a civilization of truth and love.” I could not have said it better myself! And that, my friends, is why we are here. Both are necessary, both, together, if we wish to have a flourishing society: truth and love. This is the legacy we have received from our ancestors in faith.
 To my fellow believers in Jesus Christ I would call our attention to those first generations of Christians in the city of Rome, who were so often scapegoated by the powerful pagan Roman government. But when a plague would strike the city and the well-to-do fled to the hills for safety until the plague subsided, it was the Christians who stayed behind to care for the sick, at great risk to their own health and very lives. And not just the Christian sick: all the sick, regardless of religion, of how they lived their lives, or even what they thought of the Christians themselves.
 The historian Eusebius noted about the Christians of his time, “All day long some of them tended to the dying and to their burial, countless numbers with no one to care for them. Others gathered together from all parts of the city a multitude of those withered from famine and distributed bread to them all.” Likewise, the Emperor Julian complained to one of his pagan priests, “[They] support not only their poor, but ours as well.” It is this kind of love and compassion in the service of truth, especially the truth of the human person, that has marked the lives of the holy ones of our own faith tradition and others as well: hospitals, orphanages, schools, outreach to the poor and destitute – giving without concern for getting anything in return, seeing in each human being, especially in the poor and destitute, a priceless child beloved by God, whom God calls to turn away from sin and toward Him, so that they might be saved. In 1839 Jeanne Jugan met one such priceless child of God, a blind old crippled woman whom nobody cared for. That night, Jeanne carried the woman home to her apartment, and put her to sleep in her own bed. From this profound encounter was born the Little Sisters of the Poor, who even today are loving, caring for and providing homes for thousands of elderly who deserve dignity as well as care. These are the very nuns who now face the possibility of being shut out of spreading the love of Jesus to the needy because of their refusal to comply with a healthcare mandate that violates their moral convictions, convictions which stand on the truth of basic human dignity.
 Let us, then, take our cue from the best our predecessors in faith have inspired, and not humanity’s frequent failings and sins. Like them, we now in our own time need to proclaim and live the truth with charity and compassion as it applies to us today: the truth of a united family based on the union of the children’s father and mother in marriage as the foundational good of society. Every child comes from a man and a woman, and has a right, a natural human right, to know and be known by, to love and be loved by, their own mother and father.
 This is the great public good that marriage is oriented towards and protects. The question is then: does society need an institution that unites children to the mothers and fathers who bring them into the world, or doesn’t it? If it does, that institution is marriage – nothing else provides this basic good to children. Yes, this is a foundational truth, and one to which we must witness by lives lived in conformity to it, and which we must proclaim with love. Love for those millions of loving single mothers and fathers who struggle to pick up the pieces of their lives and succeed in creating loving homes for their children – they need and deserve our love, affirmation and support. Love for the husband struggling with fidelity, for the woman who feels abandoned and pressured into abortion, for the teenager struggling to believe in the heroic vision of love that makes sense of chastity, for the single person who cannot find a mate, for the childless couple trying to cope with infertility, for the wife who finds herself nursing a sick husband in her marriage bed, for the young person trying to navigate through sexual identity issues and may feel alienated from the Church because of it, maybe even because of the sort of treatment received from those who profess to be believers.
 To all of you, I say: know that you are a child of God, that you are called to heroic love and that with God’s help you can do it, that we love you and want to support you in living your God-given call. And let us not forget: we must also proclaim this truth especially with love for those who disagree with us on this issue, and most of all, for those who are hostile toward us. We must be careful, though, not to paint our opponents on this issue with broad strokes. There is a tendency in our culture to do this to groups of people the powerful don’t know and think they don’t like. We must not do that. We must recognize that there are people on the other side of this debate who are of good will and are sincerely trying to promote what they think is right and fair. It is misdirected good will. But even those from whom we suffer retribution – and I know some of you have suffered in very serious ways because of your stand for marriage – still, we must love them. That is what our ancestors in faith did, and we must, too.
 Yes, it is easy to become resentful when you are relentlessly and unfairly painted as a bigot and are punished for publicly standing by the basic truth of marriage as a foundational societal good; it is tempting to respond in kind. Don’t. For those of us who are Catholic, we just heard our Master command us in the gospel proclaimed at Mass the day before yesterday: “love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you” (Mt 5:44). We must not allow the angry rhetoric to co-opt us into a culture of hate. Yes, we must show love toward all of these and more. Love is the answer. But love in the truth. The truth is that every child comes from a mother and a father, and to deliberately deprive a child of knowing and being loved by his or her mother and father is an outright injustice. That is our very nature, and no law can change it.
 Those with temporal power over us might choose to change the definition of marriage in the law even against all that we have accomplished through very generous participation in the democratic process, but our nature does not change. If the law does not correspond to our nature, such that there is a conflict between the law and nature, guess which will prevail? And people will figure it out. We can take heart from what we see happening now in the pro-life movement. Back in the early 1970’s, just before the Court issued its infamous Roe vs. Wade ruling, public support for abortion was growing rapidly. And as with marriage redefinition today, a generation gap opened up in the polls, leading many to predict that opposition to abortion would literally die off. That was the future; before long, it would not even be an issue. Instead, something unexpected happened. A relatively small band of faithful believers held the line on the sanctity of human life in the womb, and today, two generations later, the pro-life movement is flourishing like never before. We now have the most pro-life generation of young adults since the infamous Roe decision.
 People have figured out that it is a human life that is within the mother’s womb, and that abortion, yes, really does harm women; they’ve figured out that it’s good to cherish that human life and surround the mother with love and support so a truly happy choice can be made, the choice for life. People, too, will figure out that a child comes from a father and a mother, and it’s good for the child to be connected to his or her father and mother.
 These truths may seem obvious to us, but they aren’t to everyone while in the heat of controversy. They will figure out this truth about marriage, though, because it, too, is in our nature, and it is a key to individual and societal flourishing. All we have to do is look around and see that our society is broken and hurting in so many ways; there is so much work to do to fix it and bring healing. Yes, it is very complex, and many different things need to be done: we need to fix our economy; we especially need to pay a living wage to working class families; we need to fix our broken immigration system; we need to improve our schools, especially those that are failing children from poorer families.
 Yes, we need to do all this and more. But none of these solutions will have a lasting effect if we do not rebuild a marriage culture, a culture which recognizes and supports the good of intact families, built on the marriage between a man and a woman committed to loving faithfulness to each other and to their children. No justice, no peace, no end to poverty, without a strong culture of marriage and the family.
 This noble cause is a call to love we cannot abandon, that we will not give up on, and that in the end we know will triumph. So take heart: the truth spoken in love has a power over the human heart. We are here today to March for Marriage, to pick up the torch, and pass on to a new generation the truth about marriage, not just the abstract truth, but the lived reality that makes a difference in children’s lives. So, my friends, we must not give up: the truth will not go away, and we will not go away. Let us take heart from the legacy we have received, let us place our trust in God, and let us go forth to build a civilization of truth and love.

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Pope Francis : If you seek these treasures, your heart will be in chains, but Jesus wants our hearts to be free.

Pope Francis at Santa Marta
20/06/2014

(Vatican Radio) Pope Francis on Friday warned of the allure of money, power and prestige which harden the heart and can never bring true happiness. The real treasures which can gladden our hearts, he said, are love for our neighbours and adoration of God. The Pope’s words came during morning Mass at his Santa Marta residence,Pope Francis based his homily on the Gospel reading for the day where Jesus tells his disciples not to store up treasures for themselves on earth. The first of those earthly treasures, he said, is money which is always at risk from thieves and from the whims of the stock market. Money, he said, is necessary to provide for ourselves and our families, but he warned that those who are always seeking ways of accumulating wealth will end up losing their souls.
Another earthly treasure the Pope spoke about is prestige or the vanity of those who are always showing off, just like the hypocrites of Jesus’ day who made a great show of their prayers and almsgiving. Thirdly, Pope Francis warned against the allure of power, saying, ‘How many proud and powerful men and women have ended up in anonymity, in poverty and in prison!”
If you seek these treasures, Pope Francis said, your heart will be in chains, but Jesus wants our hearts to be free. And our hearts can only be free if we seek the treasures of heaven, that is love, patience, service of others and adoration of God. These treasures will lead to a free and luminous heart that will also age well – like a good wine, the Pope said. He concluded by praying for the spiritual prudence to discern and free out hearts from the slavery of earthly treasures, so that we may know the true joy and freedom of living as children of God. Shared from Radio Vaticana

Full Text Pope Francis "Drug addiction is an evil, and with evil there can be no yielding or compromise. "

Pope Francis
20/06/2014

(Vatican Radio) Pope Francis has expressed his “grief and concern” over the international  “scourge of drug use” that puts increasing numbers of young people at risk.  Addressing heads of world anti-drug agencies at the conclusion of the 31st International Drug Enforcement Conference in Rome, the Pope called drug addiction “an evil” which itself cannot be healed with drugs. “With evil, there can be no yielding or compromise,” said the Pope, condemning attempts to legalize so-called “recreational drugs.”  “To think that harm can be reduced by permitting drug addicts to use narcotics,” he said, “in no way resolves the problem.”  Substitute drugs, he affirmed, “are not an adequate therapy but rather a veiled means of surrendering to the problem…no to every type of drug use!”
He deplored the commerce “which transcends national and continental borders,” leading to the “inexorable” spread of drug use and applauded the work of anti-drug agencies to stop it.  The Pope encouraged them to effectively coordinate anti-narcotics policies and strategies aimed at fighting the drug trade.
To say “no” to drugs, Pope Francis pointed out, one has to say “yes” to life, love, others, education and greater job opportunities.  “If we say ‘yes’ to all these things,” he said, “there will be no room for illicit drugs, for alcohol abuse, for other forms of addiction.”
The Pope added the Church, through “creative love” and its workers and volunteers, goes out to meet those who have fallen into the trap of addiction, and helps them to rediscover their dignity and …inner strengths… that drug use had buried but can never obliterate.”
Below, we publish the English translation of Pope Francis’ remarks to participants of the International Drug Enforcement Conference:
Ladies and Gentlemen,
I am pleased to greet you at the conclusion of this International Drug Enforcement Conference. I thank you for your visit and I express my appreciation for your work in combating this most serious and complex problem of our time. It is my hope that these days in Rome will prove profitable for your future efforts. In particular, I trust that you will accomplish the goals which you have set for yourselves: a more effective coordination of anti-narcotics policies, better sharing of relevant information and the development of an operative strategy aimed at fighting the drug trade.
The scourge of drug use continues to spread inexorably, fed by a deplorable commerce which transcends national and continental borders. As a result, the lives of more and more young people and adolescents are in danger. Faced with this reality, I can only manifest my grief and concern.
Let me state this in the clearest terms possible: the problem of drug use is not solved with drugs! Drug addiction is an evil, and with evil there can be no yielding or compromise. To think that harm can be reduced by permitting drug addicts to use narcotics in no way resolves the problem. Attempts, however limited, to legalize so-called “recreational drugs”, are not only highly questionable from a legislative standpoint, but they fail to produce the desired effects. Substitute drugs are not an adequate therapy but rather a veiled means of surrendering to the phenomenon. Here I would reaffirm what I have stated on another occasion: No to every type of drug use. It is as simple as that. No to any kind of drug use (cf. General Audience, 7 May 2014). But to say this “no”, one has to say “yes” to life, “yes” to love, “yes” to others, “yes” to education, “yes” to greater job opportunities. If we say “yes” to all these things, there will be no room for illicit drugs, for alcohol abuse, for other forms of addiction.
The Church, in fidelity to Jesus’ command to go out to all those places where people suffer, thirst, hunger and are imprisoned (cf. Mt 25:31-46), does not abandon those who have fallen into the trap of drug addiction, but goes out to meet them with creative love. She takes them by the hand, thanks to the efforts of countless workers and volunteers, and helps them to rediscover their dignity and to revive those inner strengths, those personal talents, which drug use had buried but can never obliterate, since every man and woman is created in the image and likeness of God (cf. Gen 1:26).
The example of all those young people who are striving to overcome drug dependency and to rebuild their lives can serve as a powerful incentive for all of us to look with confidence to the future.
Ladies and Gentlemen, I encourage you to carry on your work with constantly renewed hope. To you and your associates I impart my blessing.
Shared from Radio Vaticana

Today's Mass Readings Online : Friday June 20, 2014

Friday of the Eleventh Week in Ordinary Time
Lectionary: 369

Reading 12 KGS 11:1-4, 9-18, 20

When Athaliah, the mother of Ahaziah,
saw that her son was dead,
she began to kill off the whole royal family.
But Jehosheba, daughter of King Jehoram and sister of Ahaziah,
took Joash, his son, and spirited him away, along with his nurse,
from the bedroom where the princes were about to be slain.
She concealed him from Athaliah, and so he did not die.
For six years he remained hidden in the temple of the LORD,
while Athaliah ruled the land.

But in the seventh year,
Jehoiada summoned the captains of the Carians
and of the guards.
He had them come to him in the temple of the LORD,
exacted from them a sworn commitment,
and then showed them the king’s son.

The captains did just as Jehoiada the priest commanded.
Each one with his men, both those going on duty for the sabbath
and those going off duty that week,
came to Jehoiada the priest.
He gave the captains King David’s spears and shields,
which were in the temple of the LORD.
And the guards, with drawn weapons,
lined up from the southern to the northern limit of the enclosure,
surrounding the altar and the temple on the king’s behalf.
Then Jehoiada led out the king’s son
and put the crown and the insignia upon him.
They proclaimed him king and anointed him,
clapping their hands and shouting, “Long live the king!”

Athaliah heard the noise made by the people,
and appeared before them in the temple of the LORD.
When she saw the king standing by the pillar, as was the custom,
and the captains and trumpeters near him,
with all the people of the land rejoicing and blowing trumpets,
she tore her garments and cried out, “Treason, treason!”
Then Jehoiada the priest instructed the captains
in command of the force:
“Bring her outside through the ranks.
If anyone follows her,” he added, “let him die by the sword.”
He had given orders that she
should not be slain in the temple of the LORD.
She was led out forcibly to the horse gate of the royal palace,
where she was put to death.

Then Jehoiada made a covenant between the LORD as one party
and the king and the people as the other,
by which they would be the LORD’s people;
and another covenant, between the king and the people.
Thereupon all the people of the land went to the temple of Baal
and demolished it.
They shattered its altars and images completely,
and slew Mattan, the priest of Baal, before the altars.
Jehoiada appointed a detachment for the temple of the LORD.
All the people of the land rejoiced and the city was quiet,
now that Athaliah had been slain with the sword
at the royal palace.

Responsorial Psalm PS 132:11, 12, 13-14, 17-18

R. (13) The Lord has chosen Zion for his dwelling.
The LORD swore to David
a firm promise from which he will not withdraw:
“Your own offspring
I will set upon your throne.”
R. The Lord has chosen Zion for his dwelling.
“If your sons keep my covenant
and the decrees which I shall teach them,
Their sons, too, forever
shall sit upon your throne.”
R. The Lord has chosen Zion for his dwelling.
For the LORD has chosen Zion;
he prefers her for his dwelling.
“Zion is my resting place forever;
in her will I dwell, for I prefer her.”
R. The Lord has chosen Zion for his dwelling.
“In her will I make a horn to sprout forth for David;
I will place a lamp for my anointed.
His enemies I will clothe with shame,
but upon him my crown shall shine.”
R. The Lord has chosen Zion for his dwelling.

Gospel MT 6:19-23

Jesus said to his disciples:
“Do not store up for yourselves treasures on earth,
where moth and decay destroy, and thieves break in and steal.
But store up treasures in heaven,
where neither moth nor decay destroys, nor thieves break in and steal.
For where your treasure is, there also will your heart be.

“The lamp of the body is the eye.
If your eye is sound, your whole body will be filled with light;
but if your eye is bad, your whole body will be in darkness.
And if the light in you is darkness, how great will the darkness be.”

Saint June 20 : St. Silverius : Pope

St. Silverius
POPE
Feast: June 20


Information:
Feast Day:June 20
Born:480 at Frosinone (in modern Italy)
Died:November 537
Patron of:Ponza, Italy
Dates of birth and death unknown. He was the son of Pope Hormisdas who had been married before becoming one of the higher clergy. Silverius entered the service of the Church and was subdeacon at Rome when Pope Agapetus died at Constantinople, 22 April, 536. The Empress Theodora, who favoured the Monophysites sought to bring about the election as pope of the Roman deacon Vigilius who was then at Constantinople and had given her the desired guarantees as to the Monophysites. However, Theodatus, King of the Ostrogoths, who wished to prevent the election of a pope connected with Constantinople, forestalled her, and by his influence the subdeacon Silverius was chosen. The election of a subdeacon as Bishop of Rome was unusual. Consequently, it is easy to understand that, as the author of the first part of the life of Silverius in the "Liber pontificalis" (ed. Duchesne, I, 210) relates, a strong opposition to it appeared among the clergy. This, however, was suppressed by Theodatus so that, finally, after Silverius had been consecrated bishop (probably on 8 June, 536) all the Roman presbyters gave their consent in writing to his elevation. The assertion made by the author just mentioned that Silverius secured the intervention of Theodatus by payment of money is unwarranted, and is to be explained by the writer's hostile opinion of the pope and the Goths. The author of the second part of the life in the "Liber pontificalis" is favourably inclined to Silverius. The pontificate of this pope belongs to an unsettled, disorderly period and he himself fell a victim to the intrigues of the Byzantine Court.

After Silverius had become pope the Empress Theodora sought to win him for the Monophysites. She desired especially to have him enter into communion with the Monophysite Patriarch of Constantinople, Anthimus, who had been excommunicated and deposed by Agapetus, and with Severus of Antioch. However, the pope committed himself to nothing and Theodora now resolved to overthrow him and to gain the papal see for Vigilius. Troublous times befell Rome during the struggle that broke out in Italy between the Ostrogoths and the Byzantines after the death of Amalasuntha, daughter of Theodoric the Great. The Ostrogothic king, Vitiges, who ascended the throne in August, 536, besieged the city. The churches over the catacombs outside of the city were devastated, the graves of the martyrs in the catacombs themselves were broken open and desecrated. In December, 536, the Byzantine general Belisarius garrisoned Rome and was received by the pope in a friendly and courteous manner. Theodora sought to use Belisarius for the carrying out of her plan to depose Silverius and to put in his place the Roman deacon Vigilius, formerly apocrisary at Constantinople, who had now gone to Italy. Antonina, wife of Belisarius, influenced her husband to act as Theodora desired. By means of a forged letter the pope was accused of a treasonable agreement with the Gothic king who was besieging Rome. It was asserted that Silverius had offered the king to leave one of the city gates secretly open so as to permit the Goths to enter. Silverius was consequently arrested in March, 537, roughly stripped of his episcopal dress, given the clothing of a monk and carried off to exile in the East. Vigilius was consecrated Bishop of Rome in his stead.

Silverius was taken to Lycia where he was went to reside at Patara. The Bishop of Patara very soon discovered that the exiled pope was innocent. He journeyed to Constantinople and was able to lay before the Emperor Justinian such proofs of the innocence of the exile that the emperor wrote to Belisarius commanding a new investigation of the matter. Should it turn out that the letter concerning the alleged plot in favour of the Goths was forged, Silverius should be placed once more in possession of the papal see. At the same time the emperor allowed Silverius to return to Italy, and the latter soon entered the country, apparently at Naples. However, Vigilius arranged to take charge of his unlawfully deposed predecessor. He evidently acted in agreement with the Empress Theodora and was aided by Antonina, the wife of Belisarius. Silverius was taken to the Island of Palmaria in the Tyrrhenian Sea and kept their in close confinement. Here he died in consequence of the privations and harsh treatment he endured. The year of his death is unknown, but he probably did not live long after reachingPalmaria. He was buried on the island, according to the testimony of the "Liber pontificalis" on 20 June; his remains were never taken from Palmaria. According to the same witness he was invoked after death by the believers who visited his grave. In later times he was venerated as a saint. The earliest proof of this is given by a list of saints of the eleventh century (Mélanges d'archéologie et d'histoire, 1893, 169). The "Martyrologium" of Peter de Natalibus of the fourteenth century also contains his feast, which is recorded in the present Roman Martyrology on 20 June.

[Editor's note: According to the Liber Pontificalis, Pope St. Silverius was exiled not to Palmaria, but rather to the Island of Palmarola, a much smaller and more desolate island near Ponza, Italy, in the Bay of Naples.]

(Taken from Catholic Encyclopedia)


SOURCE: http://www.ewtn.com/saintsHoly/saints/S/stsilverius.asp#ixzz1yO2bRMfe

Thursday, June 19, 2014

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