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Wednesday, November 6, 2013

CATHOLIC NEWS WORLD : WED. NOV. 6, 2013 - SHARE

 2013










POPE FRANCIS IN SACRAMENTS "WE ENCOUNTER CHRIST IN ALL HIS SAVING POWER"

POPE FRANCIS "THE CHURCH IS NOT THE CHURCH ONLY FOR GOOD PEOPLE"

TODAY'S MASS ONLINE : WED. NOV. 6, 2013

TODAY'S SAINT: NOV. 6: ST. LEONARD

(Vatican Radio) At his weekly General Audience on Wednesday, Pope Francis continued his series of catechetical reflections on the Creed, focusing again this week on the Communion of Saints. The Pope also remarked that the Church cannot grow through detachment, but through love. In his continuing catechesis on the Creed, Pope Francis turned this attention again this week to the “the communion of saints” which he said was a communion not only of persons, but also of spiritual goods.
 Through our sharing in those goods, the Pope continued, we grow in communion with Christ and with the Church. He then focused on what he called “these three spiritual treasures: the sacraments, charisms and charity.
In the sacraments, the Pope explained “we encounter Christ in all his saving power, we are confirmed in the joy of faith, and sent forth to share with others the joy of salvation.” In off the cuff remarks in Italian, the Holy Father also underlined how important it is to take communion, and the importance of baptizing children early because he said “this is the presence of Jesus Christ in us, who helps us.”
The Holy Father continuing on this theme went on to stress how vital it is we go to confession. He also added, we should not be afraid of the priest scolding us because it is Jesus we meet in the sacrament of reconciliation and he forgives us.
Focusing on the second spiritual treasure, charisms, Pope Francis said that through the variety of charisms, the spiritual gifts and graces bestowed by the Holy Spirit, we help to build up the Church in unity, holiness and service.
Then moving on to the third spiritual treasure, charity, the Pope said that those who do not have this virtue, do not serve the Church. On the subject of Charity, the Holy Father speaking in Italian, asked the faithful in St Peter’s Square to pray as an act of goodness, for a little girl aged one and a half who he met before the Audience. The Pope told them she was very sick. Let us pray, he said for this beautiful little girl.
In his concluding his remarks, Pope Francis said “we are here for one another”. The Church cannot grow if people are detached, cold and bad humoured. The Church, he added can only grow through love.
Following his catechesis, the Holy Father greeted English speaking pilgrims who had come from as far away as the United States and Australia.

SHARED FROM RADIO VATICANA

POPE FRANCIS "THE CHURCH IS NOT THE CHURCH ONLY FOR GOOD PEOPLE"

(Vatican Radio) At the heart of Christianity is an invitation to the Lord’s feast. That was Pope Francis’ message at Mass this morning at the Casa Santa Marta. The Pope said that the Church is “not only for good people;” the invitation to be a part of it concerns everyone. And he added that, at the Lord’s feast we must “participate fully” and with everyone; we can’t pick and choose. Christians, he said, can’t be content with simply being on the guest list – not participating fully is like not joining in.   

The readings of the day, the Pope said, the identity of the Christian. He emphasized that “first of all, the Christian essence is an invitation: we only become Christians if we are invited.” It is a “free invitation” from God to participate. You can’t pay to get into the feast, he warned: “either you are invited or you can’t come in.” If “in our conscience,” he said, “we don’t have this certainty of being invited” then “we haven’t understood what a Christian is”:

“A Christian is one who is invited. Invited to what? To a shop? To take a walk? The Lord wants to tell us something more: You are invited to join in the feast, to the joy of being saved, to the joy of being redeemed, to the joy of sharing life with Christ. This is a joy! You are called to a party! A feast is a gathering of people who talk, laugh, celebrate, are happy together. I have never seen anyone party on their own. That would be boring, no? Opening the bottle of wine . . . That’s not a feast, it’s something else. You have to party with others, with the family, with friends, with those who’ve been invited, as I was invited. Being Christian means belonging, belonging to this body, to the people that have been invited to the feast: this is Christian belonging.”

Turning to the Letter to the Romans, the Pope then affirmed that this feast is a “feast of unity.” He underlined the fact that all are invited, “the good and the bad.” And the first to be invited are the marginalized: 

“The Church is not the Church only for good people. Do we want to describe who belongs to the Church, to this feast? The sinners. All of us sinners are invited. At this point there is a community that has diverse gifts: one has the gift of prophecy, another of ministry, who teaching. . . We all have qualities and strengths. But each of us brings to the feast a common gift. Each of us is called to participate fully in the feast. Christian existence cannot be understood without this participation. ‘I go to the feast, but I don’t go beyond the antechamber, because I want to be only with the three or four people that I familiar with. . .’ You can’t do this in the Church! You either participate fully or you remain outside. You can’t pick and choose: the Church is for everyone, beginning with those I’ve already mentioned, the most marginalized. It is everyone’s Church!”

Speaking about the parable in which Jesus said some who were invited began to make excuses, Pope Francis said: “They don’t accept the invitation! They say ‘yes,’ but their actions say ‘no.’” These people, he said, “are Christians who are content to be on the guest list: chosen Christians.” But, he warned, this is not sufficient, because if you don’t participate you are not a Christian. “You were on the list,” he said, but this isn’t enough for salvation! This is the Church: to enter into the Church is a grace; to enter into the Church is an invitation.” And this right, he added, cannot be purchased. “To enter into the Church,” he added, “is to become part of a community, the community of the Church. To enter into the Church is to participate in all the virtues, the qualities that the Lord has given us in our service of one for the other.” Pope Francis continued, “To enter into the Church means to be responsible for those things that the Lord asks of us.” Ultimately, he said, “to enter into the Church is to enter into this People of God, in its journey towards eternity.” No one, he warned, is the protagonist of the Church: but we have ONE,” who has done everything. God “is the protagonist!” We are his followers . . . and “he who does not follow Him is the one who excuses himself” and does not go to the feast: 

The Lord is very generous. The Lord opens all doors. The Lord also understands those who say to Him, ‘No, Lord, I don’t want to go to you.’ He understands and is waiting for them, because He is merciful. But the Lord does not like those who say ‘yes’ and do the opposite; who pretend to thank Him for all the good things; who have good manners, but go their own way and do not follow the way of the Lord: those who always excuse themselves, those who do not know joy, who don’t experience the joy of belonging. Let us ask the Lord for this grace of understanding: how beautiful it is to be invited to the feast, how beautiful it is to take part in it and to share one’s qualities, how beautiful it is to be with Him and how wrong it is to dither between ‘yes’ and ‘no,’ to say ‘yes,’ but to be satisfied merely with being a nominal Christian. 
SHARED FROM RADIO VATICANA

POPE CELEBRATES MASS FOR DECEASED CARDINALS AND BISHOPS


(Vatican Radio) Pope Francis on Monday, November 4 celebrated Mass in remembrance of all the Cardinals and Bishops who died during the past year.
During the Mass, which was held in St. Peter's Basilica, the Pope reminded us that we are all in the merciful hands of God who will grant heavenly rewards to the just and the righteous.


Please find below Vatican Radio's translation of the Pope's homily: 
In the spiritual atmosphere of the month of November which is marked by the memory of the faithful departed, we remember our brother Cardinals and Bishops from around the world who have returned to the Father's house during the past year. While we offer for each of them this Holy Eucharist, let us ask the Lord to grant them the heavenly reward promised to good and faithful servants.


We listened to the words of St. Paul: "I am convinced that neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons, neither our fears for today nor our worries about tomorrow--not even the powers of hell can separate us from God's love of God, which is in Jesus Christ our Lord "(Rom 8:38-39 ).


The Apostle speaks of the love of God as the deepest, most invincible motive for our trust in Christian hope. He lists the opposing and mysterious forces that can threaten the path of faith. But he states with confidence that even if our entire existence is surrounded by threats, nothing will ever separate us from the love that Christ himself gained for us, giving of himself completely. Even evil powers that are hostile to man are powerless in the face to the intimate union of love between Jesus and those who welcome him with faith. This reality of faithful love that God has for each of us helps us to face our daily life, which is sometimes slow and tiring, with serenity and strength.

Only the sin of man can break this bond, but even in this case God will always go in search for him to restore that union that lasts even after death, it is indeed a union that in the final encounter with the Father reaches its climax. This certainty gives a new and full meaning to earthly life and opens us to hope for life beyond death.


In fact, every time we are faced with the death of a loved one or of someone we knew well, the question arises: "What will become of his life, his work, his service to the Church? “ The Book of Wisdom tells us that they are in God's hands! The hand is a sign of welcome and protection, it is the sign of a personal relationship of respect and loyalty: to offer one’s hand, to shake hands. These zealous pastors who have dedicated their lives to the service of God and to their brothers are in the hands of God. They are well looked after and they will not be corroded by death. All their days interwoven with joys and sufferings, hopes and labors, fidelity to the Gospel and passion for the spiritual and material salvation of their flocks, are in the hands of God.


Our sins are also in God's hands, those merciful hands with their "wounds" of love. It is not by chance that Jesus wanted to preserve the wounds on his hands to make us feel his mercy. This is our strength and our hope!


This reality, which is full of hope, is the prospect of final resurrection, of eternal life, to which the “righteous", those who accept the Word of God and are obedient to His Spirit are destined.


This is how we want to remember our brother Cardinals and Bishops who are deceased. Men who were devoted to their vocations and to their service to the Church, which they loved as one loves a bride. In prayer, we entrust them to the mercy of the Lord, through the intercession of Our Lady and of St. Joseph, so they be welcomed into his kingdom of light and peace, where the just and those who have been faithful witnesses to the Gospel live eternally.

And let us also pray that the Lord may prepare us for this encounter. We do not know the date, but that encounter will take place!

SHARED FROM RADIO VATICANA

BOMB HITS VATICAN NUNCIATURE IN DAMASCUS SYRIA

ASIA NEWS REPORT:
The front of the building, part of the roof and the eaves on the third floor were hit, including the sleeping quarters. The nuncio is working to ensure the success of the peace conference. The pontifical legation will continue to work and does not plan to shut down or move.


Damascus (AsiaNews) - A mortar round hit the Vatican Nunciature building this morning in Damascus. The bomb was aimed at the third floor, where the sleeping quarters of the Nuncio Mgr Mario Zenari, his secretary Fr Giorgio, and the sisters working at the residence are located.
"Thank God no one was hit," Fr Giorgio told AsiaNews. The mortar round destroyed part of the roof, including the eaves of the building and part of the facade.
Archbishop Zenari is one of the few diplomats who never left his post in the past two years of civil war. He continues, along with the pope, to push the international community for a peace conference on Syria, without any veto on participants.
The Syrian government and opponents disagree on the ground rules for the conference set for late November.
Rebels will participate only if Bashar Assad leaves power and threaten anyone who dares to take part. The Syrian regime said that it would not participate with such a pre-condition.
UN and Arab League envoy Lahdar Brahimi, who is tasked with preparing the peace conference, met with US and Russian representatives in Geneva in order to lay the grounds for the event.
The Nunciature has not said anything as to who might be behind the attack. The fact that it was a single salvo leads to believe that the building was targeted.
After the explosion, firefighters, emergency crews and police came to the Vatican legation building. The Syrian President sent a message of solidarity.

Despite the attack, the Nunciature is not planning to close or move its staff. "Papal legations are never closed," Fr Giorgio said. "We shall only take a few precautions."
SHARED FROM ASIA NEWS 

TODAY'S MASS ONLINE : WED. NOV. 6, 2013

Wednesday of the Thirty-first Week in Ordinary Time
Lectionary: 487


Reading 1                    ROM 13:8-10

Brothers and sisters:
Owe nothing to anyone, except to love one another;
for the one who loves another has fulfilled the law.
The commandments, You shall not commit adultery;
you shall not kill;
you shall not steal;
you shall not covet,

and whatever other commandment there may be,
are summed up in this saying, namely,
You shall love your neighbor as yourself.
Love does no evil to the neighbor;
hence, love is the fulfillment of the law.

Responsorial Psalm                              PS 112:1B-2, 4-5, 9

R. ( 5a) Blessed the man who is gracious and lends to those in need.
or:
R. Alleluia.
Blessed the man who fears the LORD,
who greatly delights in his commands.
His posterity shall be mighty upon the earth;
the upright generation shall be blessed.
R. Blessed the man who is gracious and lends to those in need.
or:
R. Alleluia.
He dawns through the darkness, a light for the upright;
he is gracious and merciful and just.
Well for the man who is gracious and lends,
who conducts his affairs with justice.
R. Blessed the man who is gracious and lends to those in need.
or:
R. Alleluia.
Lavishly he gives to the poor;
his generosity shall endure forever;
his horn shall be exalted in glory.
R. Blessed the man who is gracious and lends to those in need.
or:
R. Alleluia.

Gospel                            LK 14:25-33

Great crowds were traveling with Jesus,
and he turned and addressed them,
“If anyone comes to me without hating his father and mother,
wife and children, brothers and sisters,
and even his own life,
he cannot be my disciple.
Whoever does not carry his own cross and come after me
cannot be my disciple.
Which of you wishing to construct a tower
does not first sit down and calculate the cost
to see if there is enough for its completion?
Otherwise, after laying the foundation
and finding himself unable to finish the work
the onlookers should laugh at him and say,
‘This one began to build but did not have the resources to finish.’
Or what king marching into battle would not first sit down
and decide whether with ten thousand troops
he can successfully oppose another king
advancing upon him with twenty thousand troops?
But if not, while he is still far away,
he will send a delegation to ask for peace terms.
In the same way,
everyone of you who does not renounce all his possessions
cannot be my disciple.”

TODAY'S SAINT: NOV. 6: ST. LEONARD


St. Leonard
HERMIT, CONFESSOR
Feast: November 6
Information:
Feast Day:
November 6
Died:
559
Patron of:
political prisoners, imprisoned people, prisoners of war, and captives, women in labor, as well as horses

St Leonard, or Lienard, was a French nobleman of great reputation in the court of Clovis I, and in the flower of his age was converted to the faith by St. Remigius, probably after the battle of Tolbiac. Being instructed in the obligations of our heavenly warfare, wherein the prize of the victory is an assured crown of immortal glory, he resolved to lay aside all worldly pursuits, quitted the court, and became a constant disciple of St. Remigius. The holy instructions and example of that saint made every day deeper impressions upon his tender soul, and Leonard seemed to have inherited the very spirit of his master, and to be animated with the same simplicity, disinterestedness, modesty, zeal, and charity. He preached the faith some time; but finding it very difficult to resist the king's importunities, who would needs call him to court, and burning with a desire of giving himself up entirely to the exercises of penance and contemplation, he retired privately into the territory of Orleans, where St. Mesmin or Maximin governed the monastery of Micy (called afterwards St. Mesmin's), which his uncle St. Euspicius had founded, two leagues from the city, in 508. In this house St. Leonard took the religious habit and inured himself to the fervent practices of regular discipline under the direction of St. Mesmin and of St. Lie or Laetus, a holy monk of that house, who afterwards died a hermit.
St. Leonard himself aspiring after a closer solitude, with the leave of St. Mesmin left his monastery, travelled through Berry, where he converted many idolaters, and coming into Limousin, chose for his retirement a forest four leagues from Limoges. Here, in a place called Nobiliac, he built himself an oratory, lived on wild herbs and fruits, and had for some time no other witness of his penance and virtues but God alone. His zeal and devotion sometimes carried him to the neighbouring churches, and some who by his discourses were inflamed with a desire of imitating his manner of life joined him in his desert, and formed a community which, in succeeding times, out of devotion to the saint's memory, became a flourishing monastery, called first Noblat, afterwards St. Leonard le Noblat. The reputation of his sanctity and miracles being spread very wide, the king bestowed on him and his fellow-hermits a considerable part of the forest where they lived. The saint, even before he retired to Micy, had been most remarkable for his charity toward captives and prisoners, and he laid himself out with unwearied zeal in affording them both corporeal and spiritual help and comfort, and he obtained of the governors the liberty of many. This was also the favourite object of his charity after he had discovered himself to the world in Limousin, and began to make frequent excursions to preach and instruct the people of that country. It is related that some were miraculously delivered from their chains by his prayers, and that the king, out of respect for his eminent sanctity, granted him a special privilege of sometimes setting prisoners at liberty; which about that time was frequently allowed to certain holy bishops and others. But the saint's chief aim and endeavours in this charitable employment were to bring malefactors and all persons who fell under this affliction to a true sense of the enormity of their sins, and to a sincere spirit of compunction and penance, and a perfect reformation of their lives. When he had filled up the measure of his good works, his labours were crowned with a happy death about the year 559, according to the new Paris Breviary. Many great churches in England of which he is the titular saint, and our ancient calendars, show his name to have been formerly no less famous in England. In a list of holidays published at Worcester in 1240, St. Leonard's festival is ordered to be kept a half-holiday, with an obligation of hearing mass and a prohibition of labour except that of the plough. He was particularly invoked in favour of prisoners, and several miracles are ascribed to him.

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