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Friday, August 2, 2013

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POPE FRANCIS MESSAGE TO MUSLIMS "BE TRUE PROMOTERS OF MUTUAL RESPECT"

NEW BOOK ON VATICAN EXPERIENCE - HOLY SEE, UNHOLY ME - BY TIM FISCHER OF AUSTRALIA

38000 DISPLACED IN MYANMAR DUE TO DEVASTATING RAIN

TODAY'S SAINT: AUG. 2: OUR LADY OF THE ANGELS PORTIUNCULA

TODAY'S SAINT: AUG. 2: ST. EUSEBIUS OF VERCELLI

TODAY'S MASS ONLINE : FRI. AUG. 2, 2013

(Vatican Radio) The Vatican has published a message from Pope Francis to the world's Muslims for the conclusion of Ramadan. This year, the Islamic period of prayer and fasting concludes between August 8th and 9th

Though it’s usually issued by the Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue, Pope Francis says at the start of his pontificate, he wished to personally send this message of good wishes to the world’s Muslims himself as they celebrate Id al-Fitr, breaking their fast. 
 In the message, the Pope proposes a theme of common reflection “that concerns both Muslims and Christians: Promoting Mutual Respect through Education.”

Saying respect is a mutual “process” of kindness, Pope Francis invited Muslims and Christians to respect each person “first of all his life, his physical integrity, his dignity and the rights deriving from that dignity, his reputation, his property, his ethnic and cultural identity, his ideas and his political choices. We are therefore called to think, speak and write respectfully of the other, not only in his presence, but always and everywhere, avoiding unfair criticism or defamation. Families, schools, religious teaching and all forms of media have a role to play in achieving this goal.”

Where interreligious relations are concerned, “especially between Christians and Muslims,” the Pope said, “ we are called to respect the religion of the other, its teachings, its symbols, its values. Particular respect is due to religious leaders and to places of worship. How painful are attacks on one or other of these!”

In educating our Muslim and Christian youth, the Pope said, “we have to bring up our young people to think and speak respectfully of other religions and their followers, and to avoid ridiculing or denigrating their convictions and practices.”

Reiterating “the great importance of dialogue and cooperation among believers, in particular Christians and Muslims,” Pope Francis said these need to be “enhanced” and he expressed his hope that people of both faiths “may be true promoters of mutual respect and friendship, in particular through education.”
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Below, please find the text of Pope Francis’ message:


To Muslims throughout the World

It gives me great pleasure to greet you as you celebrate ‘Id al-Fitr, so concluding the month of Ramadan, dedicated mainly to fasting, prayer and almsgiving.

It is a tradition by now that, on this occasion, the Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue sends you a message of good wishes, together with a proposed theme for common reflection. This year, the first of my Pontificate, I have decided to sign this traditional message myself and to send it to you, dear friends, as an expression of esteem and friendship for all Muslims, especially those who are religious leaders.

As you all know, when the Cardinals elected me as Bishop of Rome and Universal Pastor of the Catholic Church, I chose the name of “Francis”, a very famous saint who loved God and every human being deeply, to the point of being called “universal brother”. He loved, helped and served the needy, the sick and the poor; he also cared greatly for creation.

I am aware that family and social dimensions enjoy a particular prominence for Muslims during this period, and it is worth noting that there are certain parallels in each of these areas with Christian faith and practice.

This year, the theme on which I would like to reflect with you and with all who will read this message is one that concerns both Muslims and Christians: Promoting Mutual Respect through Education.

This year’s theme is intended to underline the importance of education in the way we understand each other, built upon the foundation of mutual respect. “Respect” means an attitude of kindness towards people for whom we have consideration and esteem. “Mutual” means that this is not a one-way process, but something shared by both sides.

What we are called to respect in each person is first of all his life, his physical integrity, his dignity and the rights deriving from that dignity, his reputation, his property, his ethnic and cultural identity, his ideas and his political choices. We are therefore called to think, speak and write respectfully of the other, not only in his presence, but always and everywhere, avoiding unfair criticism or defamation. Families, schools, religious teaching and all forms of media have a role to play in achieving this goal.

Turning to mutual respect in interreligious relations, especially between Christians and Muslims, we are called to respect the religion of the other, its teachings, its symbols, its values. Particular respect is due to religious leaders and to places of worship. How painful are attacks on one or other of these!

It is clear that, when we show respect for the religion of our neighbours or when we offer them our good wishes on the occasion of a religious celebration, we simply seek to share their joy, without making reference to the content of their religious convictions.

Regarding the education of Muslim and Christian youth, we have to bring up our young people to think and speak respectfully of other religions and their followers, and to avoid ridiculing or denigrating their convictions and practices.

We all know that mutual respect is fundamental in any human relationship, especially among people who profess religious belief. In this way, sincere and lasting friendship can grow.

When I received the Diplomatic Corps accredited to the Holy See on 22 March 2013, I said: “It is not possible to establish true links with God, while ignoring other people. Hence it is important to intensify dialogue among the various religions, and I am thinking particularly of dialogue with Islam. At the Mass marking the beginning of my ministry, I greatly appreciated the presence of so many civil and religious leaders from the Islamic world.” With these words, I wished to emphasize once more the great importance of dialogue and cooperation among believers, in particular Christians and Muslims, and the need for it to be enhanced.

With these sentiments, I reiterate my hope that all Christians and Muslims may be true promoters of mutual respect and friendship, in particular through education.

Finally, I send you my prayerful good wishes, that your lives may glorify the Almighty and give joy to those around you. 
Happy Feast to you all!
From the Vatican, 10 July 2013
Shared from Radio Vaticana 

NEW BOOK ON VATICAN EXPERIENCE - HOLY SEE, UNHOLY ME - BY TIM FISCHER OF AUSTRALIA

Catholic Communications, Sydney Archdiocese,
1 Aug 2013
Michael Casey and Danny Casey from the Archdiocese of Sydney and Tim Fischer at his Sydney book launch
It is very rare to read a book but feel the author is talking directly to you with all the inflections, nuances and personal characteristics of that person.
This is certainly the case with Holy See, Unholy Me - tales from Tim Fischer's 1,000 days in Rome as Australia's first resident Ambassador to the Holy See
At his Sydney book launch at Mary MacKillop Place today Tim left no-one in doubt about the unique perspective he brought to the Holy See with his words of wit and wisdom.
The book provides a rare, fascinating and often humorous insight into the workings (and sometimes non- workings) of the Vatican by the former National Party Leader and Deputy Prime Minister who has always epitomised colour, movement and action.
This phase in Tim's life started with a phone call from the then, and again present, Prime Minister Kevin Rudd in July 2008. In January the following year he was launched into a new job which combined all his favourite things - politics, trains, food, faith, history,  Rome and of course family when they could visit.
He was both observer and active participant in a world of protocols and diplomacy. There were also other significant dimensions to his role.
In October 2012 Australia was to contest the ballot for a rotational seat on the United Nations Security Council. This would mean an intense four year campaign and Rome was seen as one of the hubs for this activity.
Ambassador Fischer meets Pope Benedict XVI
Australia had also become a key member of the G20, a pet project of the PM, but was the only country of this group that did not have a full-time resident ambassador to the Holy See.
Tim Fischer was certainly going to have his hands full.
As he navigated the world scene of religious and political leaders Tim became a popular and respected  ambassador around the Papal state, easily recognisable with his Black Akubra and welcoming, open presence.
As Tim writes in his book, no matter where an ambassador is in ninety-five different locations around the world, they are part of Team Australia and their job is to promote Australia, and the policies and priorities of the Australian Government.
In that sense Tim Fischer could well be seen as opening batsman and he stayed at the crease at the Vatican for three years.
Although a very experienced politician and administrator the skills Tim Fischer needed in his new position stretched from dinner party table-talk diplomacy to avoiding world leaders like Colonel Gaddafi and even cultivating a friendship with a robust Weimaraner.
When Tim Fischer arrived in Rome the former South Australian Senator Amanda Vanstone was Ambassador to Italy. A hard hitter and hard worker who scored a lot of goals for Australia, Amanda had brought her rather large dog, Gus to Rome.
Pope Benedict meets Tim's family - Judy and sons Dominic and Harrison
As Tim writes Gus was also not without influence.
"Great Gus, a rather expressionful  Weimaraner, was allowed many liberties, and depending on your point of view he lent great life and colour to some diplomatic occasions - especially when becoming 'friendly' with the Pakistani Ambassador to Italy," Tim writes.
"Now, it has long been argued by Amanda that Gus did not try to eat the Pakistani Ambassador and definitely did not bite her; it was merely a nick. However, it is accepted that Gus did clash with the distinguished ambassador, who required tetanus and rabies shots immediately."
In re-telling this tale at the launch today Tim admitted the first draft required a slight rewrite. He was warned - Gus might sue!
Tim made friends easily in his role. Even the Swiss Guards got to know the affable Australian well. While others were often detained while careful identity examination took place, Tim would wave his Akubra and pass through to the Vatican City.
Getting to know who's who in the Vatican and the various diplomatic corps and missions put Tim on a fast and frenetic learning curve. And if he thought he had left politics behind in Australia then this was a whole new ball game with the Vatican often playing a vital role in "applying the glue of peace to delicate political processes".
Tim with the recognisable Akubra beside the Tiber
His stories during this time are intriguing and revealing as well as highly entertaining.
Apart from Vatican city duties, Tim was also required to attend numerous conferences and missions on everything from trade and food security  to immigration, astronomy and interfaith dialogue. All with their various challenges.
However he admits one of the worst conferences by far was the week-long African Unity Conference, conducted in a huge tent with chandeliers near the Libyan capital of Tripoli. This was during the last hurrah of the Gaddafi regime in mid 2009. Countries were being encouraged to travel to Libya to "celebrate" the 40th anniversary of the Gaddafi-led revolution. Tim drew the short straw for Australia.
"I was given some specific instructions. I was to be seen to represent Australia, but was not to shake the hand of Gaddafi or be photographed with him," Tim writes.
The conferences was self-indulgent, mediocre and quite bizarre. While Tim made good contacts with other representatives he rose to the biggest challenge - giving Gaddafi the "brush-past" and avoiding a meeting or conversation.
Tim also writes of the role he and his staff played in preparing for and welcoming Australians for "The Canonisation of the Great Aussie Battler" - Mary MacKillop.
Sr Maria Casey, Postulator for the Cause of Canonisation for Mary MacKillop worked closely with Tim Fischer to achieve Australia's first saint
His efforts and work before, during and after this event were mammoth. Not only was his work behind the scenes vital  to the success of the canonisation but he always made himself available to the thousands of media requests at the time.
The big final occasion of Tim Fischer's posting was the opening of Domus Australia - a place for accommodation for pilgrims and travellers to Rome. A joint project by several Australian dioceses under the leadership of Cardinal Pell.
To the surprise of some, including Vatican staff, Pope Benedict XV1 agreed to officially open Domus Australia. It was a big event and also the venue for Tim's farewell reception in January 2012.
Anyone who knows Tim Fischer also knows he has a great love for trains and the chapter on the little-used Vatican railway and the Caritas Express is a delight.
But it is not all about behind-the-scenes intrigue or light-hearted moments. Tim also addresses the issue of sexual abuse by Catholic clergy, the resignation of Pope Benedict (he predicted the event, just not the year), the conclave and election of Pope Francis and the future of the Vatican.
Tim Fischer is a great raconteur. Not surprising Holy See, Unholy Me is an enjoyable read.
Holy See, Unholy Me - 1,00days in Rome by Tim Fischer is published by Harper Collins and available through ABC Books
SHARED FROM ARCHDIOCESE OF SYDNEY

38000 DISPLACED IN MYANMAR DUE TO DEVASTATING RAIN

UCAN 38,000 people displaced following worst rains in 30 years
<p>Eastern Myanmar has been hit by heavy monsoon rains over the past week (AFP photo/Yamounnar)<span style="background-color: #262626; color: #ffffff; font-family: arial; font-size: 12px; text-transform: uppercase;"><br /></span></p>
UCAN NEWS REPORT: Eastern Myanmar has been hit by heavy monsoon rains over the past week (AFP photo/Yamounnar)
  • Thomas Toe, Yangon
  • Myanmar
  • Flooding in southeastern Myanmar has killed at least three people and left one missing, state media said today.
The worst rains in 30 years in Kayin and Mon states on Myanmar’s border with Thailand also displaced 38,000 people as rice fields and bridges were washed away.
People have been sheltering in 113 relief camps since the rains hit on July 27, said state-runMyanmar Ahlin.
Mahn Panthi, a spokesman for the Karen National Union, the political wing of a Kayin ceasefire group, said that they had counted four dead so far “and the death toll may be more than the official figures.”
Henry, an aid worker with German agency Malteser International based in Kayin state’s capital Hpa-an, said that large numbers of displaced people have started to return home.
But many houses remained flooded, he added, meaning that relief aid is still required even as water levels in the Salween River continued to drop.
“Local authorities, NGOs and private donors have reached out to the relief camps supporting [the provision of] food and water,” he said.
SHARED FROM UCAN NEWS 

 2013

TODAY'S SAINT: AUG. 2: OUR LADY OF THE ANGELS PORTIUNCULA


Our Lady of the Angels of Portiuncula
Feast: August 2


Information:
Feast Day:August 2
A town and parish situated about three-quarters of a mile from Assisi. The town, numbering about 2000 inhabitants and officially known as Santa Maria degli Angeli, has grown up around the church (basilica) of Our Lady of the Angels and the adjoining Franciscan monastery. It was here that on 24 Feb., 1208, St. Francis of Assisi recognized his vocation; here was for the most part his permanent abode, after the Benedictines (of the Cluny Congregation from about 1200) had presented him (about 1211) with the little chapel Portiuncula, i.e. a little portion (of land); here also he died on Saturday, 3 October, 1226. According to a legend, the existence of which can be traced back with certainty only to 1645, the little chapel of Portiuncula was erected under Pope Liberius (352-66) by hermits from the Valley of Josaphat, who had brought thither relics from the grave of the Blessed Virgin. The same legend relates that the chapel passed into the possession of St. Benedict in 516. It was known as Our Lady of the Valley of Josaphat or of the Angels -- the latter title referring, according to some, to Our Lady's ascent into heaven accompanied by angels (Assumption B.M.V.); a better founded opinion attributes the name to the singing of angels which had been frequently heard there. However this may be, here or in this neighbourhood was the cradle of the Franciscan Order, and on his death-bed St. Francis recommended the chapel to the faithful protection and care of his brethren. Concerning the form and plan of the first monastery built near the chapel we have no information, nor is the exact form of the loggia or platforms built round the chapel itself, or of the choir for the brothers built behind it, known. Shortly after 1290, the chapel, which measured only about twenty-two feet by thirteen and a half, became entirely inadequate to accommodate the throngs of pilgrims. The altar piece, an Annunciation, was painted by the priest, Hilarius of Viterbo, in 1393. The monastery was at most the residence, only for a short time, of the ministers-general of the order after St. Francis. In 1415 it first became associated with the Regular Observance, in the care of which it remains to the present day. The buildings, which had been gradually added to, around the shrine were taken down by order of Pius V (1566-72), except the cell in which St. Francis had died, and were replaced by a large basilica in contemporary style. The new edifice was erected over the cell just mentioned and over the Portiuncula chapel, which is situated immediately under the cupola. The basilica, which has three naves and a circle of chapels extending along the entire length of the aisles, was completed (1569-78) according to the plans of Jacob Barozzi, named Vignola (1507-73), assisted by Alessi Galeazzo (1512-72). The Doric order was chosen. The basilica forms a Latin cross 416 feet long by 210 feet wide; above the middle of the transept rises the magnificent cupola, flanked by a single side-tower, the second never having been finished. In the night of 15 March, 1832, the arch of the three naves and of the choir fell in, in consequence of an earthquake, but the cupola escaped with a big crack. Gregory XVI had all restored (1836-40), and on 8 Sept., 1840, the basilica was reconsecrated by Cardinal Lambruschini. By Brief of 11 April, 1909, Pius X raised it to a "patriarchal basilica and papal chapel". The high altar was therefore immediately rebuilt at the expense of the Franciscan province of the Holy Cross (also known as the Saxon province), and a papal throne added. The new altar was solemnly consecrated by Cardinal De Lai on 7 Dec., 1910. Under the bay of the choir, resting against the columns of the cupola, is still preserved the cell in which St. Francis died, while, a little behind the sacristy, is the spot where the saint, during a temptation, is said to have rolled in a briar-bush, which was then changed into thornless roses. During this same night the saint received the Portiuncula Indulgence. The representation of the reception of this Indulgence on the façade of the Portiuncula chapel, the work of Fr. Overbeck (1829), enjoys great celebrity.
The Portiuncula Indulgence could at first be gained only in the Portiuncula chapel between the afternoon of 1 Aug. and sunset on 2 Aug. On 5 Aug., 1480 (or 1481), Sixtus IV extended it to all churches of the first and second orders of St. Francis for Franciscans; on 4 July, 1622, this privilege was further extended by Gregory XV to all the faithful, who, after confession and the reception of Holy Communion, visited such churches on the appointed day. On 12 Oct., 1622, Gregory granted the same privilege to all the churches of the Capuchins; Urban VIII granted it for all churches of the regular Third Order on 13 Jan., 1643, and Clement X for all churches of the Conventuals on 3 Oct., 1670. Later popes extended the privilege to all churches pertaining in any way to the Franciscan Order, even to churches in which the Third Order held its meetings (even parish churches, etc.), provided that there was no Franciscan church in the district, and that such a church was distant over an Italian mile (1000 paces, about 1640 yards). Some districts and countries have been granted special privileges. On 9 July, 1910, Pius X (only, however, for that year) granted the privilege that bishops could appoint any public churches whatsoever for the gaining of the Portiuncula Indulgence, whether on 2 Aug. or the Sunday following (Acta Apostolicae Sedis, II, 1910, 443 sq.; Acta Ord. Frat. Min., XXIX, 1910, 226). This privilege has been renewed for an indefinite time by a decree of the S. Cong. of Indul., 26 March, 1911 (Acta Apostolicae Sedis, III, 1911, 233-4). The Indulgence is toties-quoties, that is, it may be gained as often as one wishes (i.e. visits the church); it is also applicable to the souls in purgatory.
While the declarations of the popes have rendered the Portiuncula Indulgence certain and indisputable from the juridico-canonistic standpoint, its historical authenticity (sc. origin from St. Francis) is still a subject of dispute. The controversy arises from the fact that none of the old legends of St. Francis mentions the Indulgence, and no contemporary document or mention of it has down to us. The oldest document dealing with the Indulgence is a notary's deed of 31 October, 1277, in which Blessed Benedict of Arezzo, whom St. Francis himself received into the order, testifies that he had been informed by Brother Masseo, a companion of St. Francis, of the granting of the Indulgence by Honorius III at Perugia. Then follow other testimonies, for example, those of Jacob Cappoli concerning Brother Leo, of Fr. Oddo of Aquasparta, Peter Zalfani, Peter John Olivi (d. 1298, who wrote a scholastic tract in defence of this indulgence about 1279), Blessed John of Laverna (Fermo; d. 1322), Ubertinus of Casale (d. after 1335), Blessed Francis of Fabriano (d. 1322), whose testimony goes back to the year 1268, etc. In addition to these rather curt and concise testimonies there are others which relate all details in connection with the granting of the Indulgence, and were reproduced in numberless books: e.g. the testimony of Michael Bernardi, the letters of Bishop Theobald of Assisi (1296-1329) and of his successor Conrad Andreae (1329-37). All the testimonies were collected by Fr. Francesco Bartholi della Rossa in a special work, "Tractatus de Indulgentia S. Mariae de Portiuncula" (ed. Sabatier, Paris, 1900). In his edition of this work, Sabatier defends the Indulgence, although in his world-famous "Vie de S. François" (Paris, 1894), he had denied its historicity (412 sqq.); he explains the silence of St. Francis and his companions and biographers as due to reasons of discretion etc. Others seek to accord more weight to the later testimonies by accentuating their connection with the first generation of the order; others again find allusions to the Indulgence in the old legends of St. Francis. On the other hand, the opponents regard the gap between 1216 and 1277 as unbridgable, and hold that the grounds brought forward by the defenders to explain this silence had vanished long before the latter date. No new documents have been found recently in favour of the authenticity of the Indulgence.
[Note: The norms and grants of indulgences were completely reformed by Pope Paul VI after the Second Vatican Council in his Apostolic Constitution "Indulgentiarum Doctrina" (1967), and the Portiuncula Indulgence was again confirmed at that time. According to the Enchiridion Indulgentiarum, the Catholic faithful may gain a plenary indulgence on 2 August (the Portiuncula) or on such other day as designated by the local ordinary for the advantage of the faithful, under the usual conditions (sacramental Confession, Holy Communion, and prayer for the intentions of the Supreme Pontiff), by devoutly visiting the parish church, and there reciting at least the Lord's Prayer and the Creed. The Indulgence applies to the cathedral church of the diocese, and to the co-cathedral church (if there is one), even if they are not parochial, and also to quasi-parochial churches. To gain this, as any plenary indulgence, the faithful must be free from any attachment to sin, even venial sin. Where this entire detachment is wanting, the indulgence is partial.]

SOURCE: http://www.ewtn.com/saintsHoly/saints/O/ourladyoftheangelsofportiuncula.asp#ixzz1TsqoFpjW

TODAY'S SAINT: AUG. 2: ST. EUSEBIUS OF VERCELLI


St. Eusebius Vercelli
MARTYR AND BISHOP
Feast: August 2


Information:
Feast Day:August 2
Born:283, Sardinia
Died:August 1, 371, Vercelli, Piemonte
Patron of:Vercelli
Bishop of Vercelli, b. in Sardinia c. 283; d. at Vercelli, Piedmont, 1 August, 371. He was made lector in Rome, where he lived some time, probably as a member or head of a religious community (Spreitzenhofer, Die Entwickelung des alten Mönchtums in Italien, Vienna, 1894, 14 sq.), Later he came to Vercelle, the present Vercelli, and in 340 was unanimously elected bishop of that city by the clergy and the people. He received episcopal consecration at the hands of Pope Julius I on 15 December, of the same year. According to the testimony of St. Ambrose (Ep. lxiii, Ad Vercellenses) he was the first bishop of the West who united monastic with clerical life. He led with the clergy of his city a common life modelled upon that of the Eastern cenobites (St. Ambrose, Ep. lxxxi and Serm. lxxxix). For this reason the Canons Regular of St. Augustine honour him along with St. Augustine as their founder (Proprium Canon. Reg., 16 December).
In 364 Pope Liberius sent Eusebius and Bishop Lucifer to Cagliari to the Emperor Constantius, who was then at Arles in Gaul, for the purpose of inducing the emperor to convoke a council which should put an end to the dissentions between the Arians and the orthodox. The synod was held in Milan in 355. At first Eusebius refused to attend it because he foresaw that the Arian bishops, who were supported by the emperor, would not accept the decrees of the Nicene council and would insist upon the condemnation of St. Athanasius. Being pressed by the emperor and the bishops to appear at the synod, he came to Milan, but was not admitted to the synod until the document condemning St. Athanasius had been drawn up and was awaiting the signature of the bishops. Eusebius vehemently protested against the unjust condemnation of St. Athanasius and, despite the threats of the emperor, refused to attach his signature to the document. As a result he was sent into exile, first to Scythopolis in Syria, where the Arian bishop Patrophilus, whom Eusebius calls his jailer, (Baronius, Annal., ad ann. 356, n. 97), treated him very cruelly; then to Cappodocia, and lastly to Thebaid. On the accession of the Emperor Julian, the exiled bishops were allowed to return to their sees, in 362. Eusebius, however, and his brother-exile Lucifer did not at once return to Italy. Acting either by force of their former legatine faculties or, as is more probable, having received new legatine faculties from Pope Liberius, they remained in the Orient for some time, helping to restore peace in the Church. Eusebius went to Alexandria to consult with St. Athanasius about convoking the synod which in 362 was held there under their joint presidency. Besides declaring the Divinity of the Holy Ghost and the orthodox doctrine concerning the Incarnation, the synod agreed to deal mildly with the repentant apostate bishops, but to impose severe penalties upon the leaders of several of Arianizing factions. At its close Eusebius went to Antioch to reconcile the Eustathians and the Meletians. The Eustathians were adherents of the bishop St. Eustatius, who was deposed and exiled by the Arians in 331. Since Meletius' election in 361 was brought about chiefly by the Arians, the Eustathians would not recognize him, although he solemnly proclamed his orthodox faith from the ambo after his episcopal consecration. The Alexandrian synod had desired that Eusebius should reconcile the Eustathians with Bishop Meletius, by purging his election of whatever might have been irregular in it, but Eusebius, upon arriving at Antioch found that his brother-legate Lucifer had consecrated Paulinus, the leader of the Eustathians, as Bishop of Antioch, and thus unwittingly had frustrated the pacific design. Unable to reconcile the factions at Antioch, he visited other Churches of the Orient in the interest of the orthodox faith, and finally passed through Illyricum into Italy. Having arrived at Vercelli in 363, he assisted the zealous St. Hilary of Poitiers in the suppression of Arianism in the Western Church, and was one of the chief opponents of the Arian Bishop Auxientius of Milan. The church honours him as a martyr and celebrates his feast as a semi-double on 16 December. In the "Journal of Theological Studies" (1900), I, 302-99, E.A. Burn attributes to Eusebius the "Quicumque".
Three short letters of Eusebius are printed in Migne, P.L., XII, 947-54 and X, 713-14. St. Jerome (De vir. ill., c. lvi, and Ep. li, n. 2) ascribes to him a Latin translation of a commentary on the Psalms, written originally in Greek by Eusebius of Cæsarea; but this work has been lost. There is preserved in the cathedral at Vercelli the "Codex Vercellensis", the earliest manuscript of the old Latin Gospels (codex a), which is generally believed to have been written by Eusebius. It was published by Irico (Milan 1748) and Bianchini (Rome, 1749), and is reprinted in Migne, P.L. XII, 9-948; a new edition was brought out by Belsheim (Christiania, 1894). Krüger (Lucifer, Bischof von Calaris", Leipzig, 1886, 118-30) ascribes to Eusebius a baptismal oration by Caspari (Quellen sur Gesch, Des Taufsymbols, Christiania, 1869, II, 132-40). The confession of faith "Des. Trinitate confessio", P.L., XII, 959-968, sometimes ascribed to Eusebius is spurious.

SOURCE: http://www.ewtn.com/saintsHoly/saints/E/steusebiusvercelli.asp#ixzz1Tsqboa4m

TODAY'S MASS ONLINE : FRI. AUG. 2, 2013

Friday of the Seventeenth Week in Ordinary Time 
Lectionary: 405


Reading 1       LV 23:1, 4-11, 15-16, 27, 34B-37

The LORD said to Moses,
“These are the festivals of the LORD which you shall celebrate
at their proper time with a sacred assembly.
The Passover of the LORD falls on the fourteenth day of the first month,
at the evening twilight.
The fifteenth day of this month is the LORD’s feast of Unleavened Bread.
For seven days you shall eat unleavened bread.
On the first of these days you shall hold a sacred assembly
and do no sort of work.
On each of the seven days you shall offer an oblation to the LORD.
Then on the seventh day you shall again hold a sacred assembly
and do no sort of work.”

The LORD said to Moses, “Speak to the children of Israel and tell them:
When you come into the land which I am giving you,
and reap your harvest,
you shall bring a sheaf of the first fruits of your harvest
to the priest, who shall wave the sheaf before the LORD
that it may be acceptable for you.
On the day after the sabbath the priest shall do this.

“Beginning with the day after the sabbath,
the day on which you bring the wave-offering sheaf,
you shall count seven full weeks,
and then on the day after the seventh week, the fiftieth day,
you shall present the new cereal offering to the LORD.

“The tenth of this seventh month is the Day of Atonement,
when you shall hold a sacred assembly and mortify yourselves
and offer an oblation to the LORD.

“The fifteenth day of this seventh month is the LORD’s feast of Booths,
which shall continue for seven days.
On the first day there shall be a sacred assembly,
and you shall do no sort of work.
For seven days you shall offer an oblation to the LORD,
and on the eighth day you shall again hold a sacred assembly
and offer an oblation to the LORD.
On that solemn closing you shall do no sort of work.

“These, therefore, are the festivals of the LORD
on which you shall proclaim a sacred assembly,
and offer as an oblation to the LORD burnt offerings and cereal offerings,
sacrifices and libations, as prescribed for each day.”

Responsorial Psalm           PS 81:3-4, 5-6, 10-11AB

R. (2a) Sing with joy to God our help.
Take up a melody, and sound the timbrel,
the pleasant harp and the lyre.
Blow the trumpet at the new moon,
at the full moon, on our solemn feast.
R. Sing with joy to God our help.
For it is a statute in Israel,
an ordinance of the God of Jacob,
Who made it a decree for Joseph
when he came forth from the land of Egypt.
R. Sing with joy to God our help.
There shall be no strange god among you
nor shall you worship any alien god.
I, the LORD, am your God
who led you forth from the land of Egypt.
R. Sing with joy to God our help.

Gospel MT 13:54-58

Jesus came to his native place and taught the people in their synagogue.
They were astonished and said,
“Where did this man get such wisdom and mighty deeds?
Is he not the carpenter’s son?
Is not his mother named Mary
and his brothers James, Joseph, Simon, and Judas?
Are not his sisters all with us?
Where did this man get all this?”
And they took offense at him.
But Jesus said to them,
“A prophet is not without honor except in his native place
and in his own house.”
And he did not work many mighty deeds there
because of their lack of faith.
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