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Monday, July 22, 2013

CATHOLIC NEWS WORLD : MON. JULY 22, 2013 - BREAKING NEWS SHARE

2013

TODAY'S SAINT: JULY 22: ST. MARY MAGDELENE

TODAY'S MASS ONLINE : MON. JULY 22, 2013

NEW KING OF BELGIUM AS FORMER ALBERT II ABDICATES

COOL SURFER PRIEST FR. CALLOWAY WRITES AMAZING NEW BOOK - UNDER THE MANTLE

TOP 10 CATHOLIC UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES OF NORTH AMERICA

POPE FRANCIS LISTEN TO THE VOICE OF JESUS - SUNDAY ANGELUS MESSAGE
PRAYER TO ST. MARY MAGDALEN BY ST. ANSELM: 
Feast July 22
Patroness of Women, penitent sinners, pharmacists, prostitutes, sexual temptations, hairdressers.
Prayer-
St Mary Magdalene, you came with springing tears to the spring of mercy, Christ; from him your burning thirst was abundantly refreshed through him your sins were forgiven; by him your bitter sorrow was consoled.
My dearest lady, well you know by your own life how a sinful soul can be reconciled with its creator, what counsel a soul in misery needs, what medicine will restore the sick to health.
It is enough for us to understand, dear friend of God, to whom were many sins forgiven, because she loved much.
Most blessed lady, I who am the most evil and sinful of men do not recall your sins as a reproach, but call upon the boundless mercy by which they were blotted out.
This is my reassurance, so that I do not despair; this is my longing, so that I shall not perish.
I say this of myself, miserably cast down into the depths of vice, bowed down with the weight of crimes, thrust down by my own hand into a dark prison of sins, wrapped round with the shadows of darkness.
Therefore, since you are now with the chosen because you are beloved and are beloved because you are chosen of God, 1, in my misery, pray to you, in bliss; in my darkness, I ask for light; in my sins, redemption; impure, I ask for purity.
 Recall in loving kindness what you used to be, how much you needed mercy, and seek for me that same forgiving love that you received when you were wanting it. Ask urgently that I may have the love that pierces the heart; tears that are humble; desire for the homeland of heaven; impatience with this earthly exile; searing repentance; and a dread of torments in eternity.
Turn to my good that ready access that you once had and still have to the spring of mercy.
Draw me to him where I may wash away my sins; bring me to him who can slake my thirst; pour over me those waters that will make my dry places fresh. You will not find it hard to gain all you desire from so loving and so kind a Lord, who is alive and reigns and is your friend.

For who can tell, beloved and blest of God, with what kind familiarity and familiar kindness he himself replied on your behalf to the calumnies of those who were against you? How he defended you, when the proud Pharisee was indignant, how he excused you, when your sister complained, how highly he praised your deed, when Judas begrudged it.
And, more than all this, what can I say, how can I find words to tell, about the burning love with which you sought him, weeping at the sepulchre, and wept for him in your seeking?
How he came, who can say how or with what kindness, to comfort you, and made you burn with love still more; how he hid from you when you wanted to see him, and showed himself when you did not think to see him; how he was there all the time you sought him, and how he sought you when, seeking him, you wept.
But you, most holy Lord, why do you ask her why she weeps?
Surely you can see; her heart, the dear life of her soul, is cruelly slain.
O love to be wondered at;
O evil to be shuddered at;
you hung on the wood, pierced by iron nails, stretched out like a thief for the mockery of wicked men; and yet, 'Woman,' you say, 'why are you weeping?' She had not been able to prevent them from killing you, but at least she longed to keep your body for a while with ointments lest it decay.
No longer able to speak with you living, at least she could mourn for you dead. So, near to death and hating her own life, she repeats in broken tones the words of life which she had heard from the living.
And now, besides all this, even the body which she was glad, in a way, to have kept, she believes to have gone.
And can you ask her, 'Woman, why are you weeping?'
Had she not reason to weep?
For she had seen with her own eyes--if she could bear to look--what cruel men cruelly did to you; and now all that was left of you from their hands she thinks she has lost.
All hope of you has fled, for now she has not even your lifeless body to remind her of you.
And someone asks, 'Who are you looking for? Why are you weeping?'
You, her sole joy, should be the last thus to increase her sorrow. But you know it all well, and thus you wish it to be, for only in such broken words and sighs can she convey a cause of grief as great as hers. The love you have inspired you do not ignore,
And indeed you know her well, the gardener, who planted her soul in his garden. What you plant, I think you also water.
Do you water, I wonder, or do you test her?
In fact, you are both watering and putting to the test.
But now, good Lord, gentle Master, look upon your faithful servant and disciple, so lately redeemed by your blood, and see how she burns with anxiety, desiring you, searching all round, questioning, and what she longs for is nowhere found.
Nothing she sees can satisfy her, since you whom alone she would behold, she sees not.
What then?
How long will my Lord leave his beloved to suffer thus?
Have you put off compassion now you have put on incorruption? Did you let go of goodness when you laid hold of immortality?
Let it not be so, Lord.
You will not despise us mortals now you have made yourself immortal, for you made yourself a mortal in order to give us immortality.
And so it is; for love's sake he cannot bear her grief for long or go on hiding himself. For the sweetness of love he shows himself who would not for the bitterness of tears.
The Lord calls his servant by the name she has often heard and the servant knows the voice of her own Lord.
I think, or rather I am sure, that she responded to the gentle tone with which he was accustomed to call, 'Mary'. What joy filled that voice, so gentle and full of love.
He could not have put it more simply and clearly:

'I know who you are and what you want; behold me; do not weep, behold me; I am he whom you seek.'

At once the tears are changed; I do not believe that they stopped at once, but where once they were wrung from a heart broken and self-tormenting they flow now from a heart exulting. How different is, 'Master!' from 'If you have taken him away, tell me'; and, 'They have taken away my Lord, and I do not know where they have laid him,' has a very different sound from,
'I have seen the Lord, and he has spoken to me.'
But how should I, in misery and without love, dare to describe the love of God and the blessed friend of God? Such a flavour of goodness will make my heart sick if it has in itself nothing of that same virtue.
But in truth, you who are very truth, you know me well and can testify that I write this for the love of your love, my Lord, my most dear Jesus.
I want your love to burn in me as you command so that I may desire to love you alone and sacrifice to you a troubled spirit, 'a broken and a contrite heart'.
Give me, 0 Lord, in this exile, the bread of tears and sorrow for which I hunger more than for any choice delights.
Hear me, for your love, and for the dear merits of your beloved Mary, and your blessed Mother, the greater Mary.
Redeemer, my good Jesus, do not despise the prayers of one who has sinned against you but strengthen the efforts of a weakling that loves you.
Shake my heart out of its indolence, Lord, and in the ardour of your love bring me to the everlasting sight of your glory where with the Father and the Holy Spirit you live and reign, God, for ever. Amen.
ATTRIBUTED TO ST. ANSELM

TODAY'S SAINT: JULY 22: ST. MARY MAGDELENE


St. Mary Magdalene
FOLLOWER OF JESUS, MODEL OF PENITENCE
Feast: July 22


Information:
Feast Day:July 22
Born:
1st century AD, Magdala
Died:1st century AD, Ephesus, Asia Minor or Marseilles, France
Patron of:apothecaries; contemplative life; converts; glove makers; hairdressers; penitent sinners; people ridiculed for their piety; perfumeries; pharmacists; reformed prostitutes; sexual temptation; tanners; women


EWTN Live Special Edition
Fr. Mitch Pacwa and Fr. Thomas Michelet Discuss the story of St. Mary Magdalene and the relic, which came to the U.S. from France for the first time: 100K300K

 http://www.ewtn.com/media/marymagdalene/Os%20St.%20Marie%20magdeleine.JPG
Mary Magdalen was so called either from Magdala near Tiberias, on the west shore of Galilee, or possibly from a Talmudic expression meaning "curling women's hair," which the Talmud explains as of an adulteress.
In the New Testament she is mentioned among the women who accompanied Christ and ministered to Him (Luke 8:2-3), where it is also said that seven devils had been cast out of her (Mark 16:9). She is next named as standing at the foot of the cross (Mark 15:40; Matthew 27:56; John 19:25; Luke 23:49). She saw Christ laid in the tomb, and she was the first recorded witness of the Resurrection.
The Greek Fathers, as a whole, distinguish the three persons:
* the "sinner" of Luke 7:36-50;
* the sister of Martha and Lazarus, Luke 10:38-42 and John 11; and
* Mary Magdalen.
On the other hand most of the Latins hold that these three were one and the same. Protestant critics, however, believe there were two, if not three, distinct persons. It is impossible to demonstrate the identity of the three; but those commentators undoubtedly go too far who assert, as does Westcott (on John 11:1), "that the identity of Mary with Mary Magdalene is a mere conjecture supported by no direct evidence, and opposed to the general tenour of the gospels." It is the identification of Mary of Bethany with the "sinner" of Luke 7:37, which is most combatted by Protestants. It almost seems as if this reluctance to identify the "sinner" with the sister of Martha were due to a failure to grasp the full significance of the forgiveness of sin. The harmonizing tendencies of so many modern critics, too, are responsible for much of the existing confusion.
The first fact, mentioned in the Gospel relating to the question under discussion is the anointing of Christ's feet by a woman, a "sinner" in the city (Luke 7:37-50). This belongs to the Galilean ministry, it precedes the miracle of the feeding of the five thousand and the third Passover. Immediately afterwards St. Luke describes a missionary circuit in Galilee and tells us of the women who ministered to Christ, among them being "Mary who is called Magdalen, out of whom seven devils were gone forth" (Luke 8:2); but he does not tell us that she is to be identified with the "sinner" of the previous chapter. In 10:38-42, he tells us of Christ's visit to Martha and Mary "in a certain town"; it is impossible to identify this town, but it is clear from 9:53, that Christ had definitively left Galilee, and it is quite possible that this "town" was Bethany. This seems confirmed by the preceding parable of the good Samaritan, which must almost certainly have been spoken on the road between Jericho and Jerusalem. But here again we note that there is no suggestion of an identification of the three persons (the "sinner", Mary Magdalen, and Mary of Bethany), and if we had only St. Luke to guide us we should certainly have no grounds for so identifying them. St. John, however, clearly identifies Mary of Bethany with the woman who anointed Christ's feet (12; cf. Matthew 26 and Mark 14). It is remarkable that already in 11:2, St. John has spoken of Mary as "she that anointed the Lord's feet", he aleipsasa; It is commonly said that he refers to the subsequent anointing which he himself describes in 12:3-8; but it may be questioned whether he would have used he aleipsasa if another woman, and she a "sinner" in the city, had done the same. It is conceivable that St. John, just because he is writing so long after the event and at a time when Mary was dead, wishes to point out to us that she was really the same as the "sinner." In the same way St. Luke may have veiled her identity precisely because he did not wish to defame one who was yet living; he certainly does something similar in the case of St. Matthew whose identity with Levi the publican (5:7) he conceals.
If the foregoing argument holds good, Mary of Bethany and the "sinner" are one and the same. But an examination of St. John's Gospel makes it almost impossible to deny the identity of Mary of Bethany with Mary Magdalen. From St. John we learn the name of the "woman" who anointed Christ's feet previous to the last supper. We may remark here that it seems unnecessary to hold that because St. Matthew and St. Mark say "two days before the Passover", while St. John says "six days" there were, therefore, two distinct anointings following one another. St. John does not necessarily mean that the supper and the anointing took place six days before, but only that Christ came to Bethany six days before the Passover. At that supper, then, Mary received the glorious encomium, "she hath wrought a good work upon Me . . . in pouring this ointment upon My body she hath done it for My burial . . . wheresoever this Gospel shall be preached . . . that also which she hath done shall be told for a memory of her." Is it credible, in view of all this, that this Mary should have no place at the foot of the cross, nor at the tomb of Christ? Yet it is Mary Magdalen who, according to all the Evangelists, stood at the foot of the cross and assisted at the entombment and was the first recorded witness of the Resurrection. And while St. John calls her "Mary Magdalen" in 19:25, 20:1, and 20:18, he calls her simply "Mary" in 20:11 and 20:16.
In the view we have advocated the series of events forms a consistent whole; the "sinner" comes early in the ministry to seek for pardon; she is described immediately afterwards as Mary Magdalen "out of whom seven devils were gone forth"; shortly after, we find her "sitting at the Lord's feet and hearing His words." To the Catholic mind it all seems fitting and natural. At a later period Mary and Martha turn to "the Christ, the Son of the Living God", and He restores to them their brother Lazarus; a short time afterwards they make Him a supper and Mary once more repeats the act she had performed when a penitent. At the Passion she stands near by; she sees Him laid in the tomb; and she is the first witness of His Resurrection--excepting always His Mother, to whom He must needs have appeared first, though the New Testament is silent on this point. In our view, then, there were two anointings of Christ's feet--it should surely be no difficulty that St. Matthew and St. Mark speak of His head--the first (Luke 7) took place at a comparatively early date; the second, two days before the last Passover. But it was one and the same woman who performed this pious act on each occasion.

The Greek Church maintains that the saint retired to Ephesus with the Blessed Virgin and there died, that her relics were transferred to Constantinople in 886 and are there preserved. Gregory of Tours (De miraculis, I, xxx) supports the statement that she went to Ephesus. However, according to a French tradition , Mary, Lazarus, and some companions came to Marseilles and converted the whole of Provence. Magdalen is said to have retired to a hill, La Sainte-Baume, near by, where she gave herself up to a life of penance for thirty years. When the time of her death arrived she was carried by angels to Aix and into the oratory of St. Maximinus, where she received the viaticum; her body was then laid in an oratory constructed by St. Maximinus at Villa Lata, afterwards called St. Maximin. History is silent about these relics till 745, when according to the chronicler Sigebert, they were removed to Vézelay through fear of the Saracens. No record is preserved of their return, but in 1279, when Charles II, King of Naples, erected a convent at La Sainte-Baume for the Dominicans, the shrine was found intact, with an inscription stating why they were hidden. In 1600 the relics were placed in a sarcophagus sent by Clement VIII, the head being placed in a separate vessel. In 1814 the church of La Sainte-Baume, wrecked during the Revolution, was restored, and in 1822 the grotto was consecrated afresh. The head of the saint now lies there, where it has lain so long, and where it has been the centre of so many pilgrimages.


SOURCE: http://www.ewtn.com/saintsHoly/saints/M/stmarymagdalen.asp#ixzz1Sqkdudkg


TODAY'S MASS ONLINE : MON. JULY 22, 2013

Memorial of Saint Mary Magdalene
Lectionary: 395/603


Reading 1               EX 14:5-18

When it was reported to the king of Egypt
that the people had fled,
Pharaoh and his servants changed their minds about them.
They exclaimed, “What have we done!
Why, we have released Israel from our service!”
So Pharaoh made his chariots ready and mustered his soldiersB
six hundred first-class chariots
and all the other chariots of Egypt, with warriors on them all.
So obstinate had the LORD made Pharaoh
that he pursued the children of Israel
even while they were marching away in triumph.
The Egyptians, then, pursued them;
Pharaoh’s whole army, his horses, chariots and charioteers,
caught up with them as they lay encamped by the sea,
at Pi-hahiroth, in front of Baal-zephon.

Pharaoh was already near when the children of Israel looked up
and saw that the Egyptians were on the march in pursuit of them.
In great fright they cried out to the LORD.
And they complained to Moses,
“Were there no burial places in Egypt
that you had to bring us out here to die in the desert?
Why did you do this to us?
Why did you bring us out of Egypt?
Did we not tell you this in Egypt, when we said,
‘Leave us alone. Let us serve the Egyptians’?
Far better for us to be the slaves of the Egyptians
than to die in the desert.”
But Moses answered the people,
“Fear not! Stand your ground,
and you will see the victory the LORD will win for you today.
These Egyptians whom you see today you will never see again.
The LORD himself will fight for you; you have only to keep still.”

Then the LORD said to Moses, “Why are you crying out to me?
Tell the children of Israel to go forward.
And you, lift up your staff and, with hand outstretched over the sea,
split the sea in two,
that the children of Israel may pass through it on dry land.
But I will make the Egyptians so obstinate
that they will go in after them.
Then I will receive glory through Pharaoh and all his army,
his chariots and charioteers.
The Egyptians shall know that I am the LORD,
when I receive glory through Pharaoh
and his chariots and charioteers.”

Responsorial Psalm               EX 15:1BC-2, 3-4, 5-6

R. (1b) Let us sing to the Lord; he has covered himself in glory.
I will sing to the LORD, for he is gloriously triumphant;
horse and chariot he has cast into the sea.
My strength and my courage is the LORD,
and he has been my savior.
He is my God, I praise him;
the God of my father, I extol him.
R. Let us sing to the Lord; he has covered himself in glory.
The LORD is a warrior,
LORD is his name!
Pharaoh’s chariots and army he hurled into the sea;
the elite of his officers were submerged in the Red Sea.
R. Let us sing to the Lord; he has covered himself in glory.
The flood waters covered them,
they sank into the depths like a stone.
Your right hand, O LORD, magnificent in power,
your right hand, O LORD, has shattered the enemy.
R. Let us sing to the Lord; he has covered himself in glory.

Gospel          JN 20:1-2, 11-18

On the first day of the week,
Mary Magdalene came to the tomb early in the morning,
while it was still dark,
and saw the stone removed from the tomb.
So she ran and went to Simon Peter
and to the other disciple whom Jesus loved, and told them,
“They have taken the Lord from the tomb,
and we don’t know where they put him.”

Mary stayed outside the tomb weeping.
And as she wept, she bent over into the tomb
and saw two angels in white sitting there,
one at the head and one at the feet
where the Body of Jesus had been.
And they said to her, “Woman, why are you weeping?”
She said to them, “They have taken my Lord,
and I don’t know where they laid him.”
When she had said this, she turned around and saw Jesus there,
but did not know it was Jesus.
Jesus said to her, “Woman, why are you weeping?
Whom are you looking for?”
She thought it was the gardener and said to him,
“Sir, if you carried him away,
tell me where you laid him,
and I will take him.”
Jesus said to her, “Mary!”
She turned and said to him in Hebrew,
“Rabbouni,” which means Teacher.
Jesus said to her,
“Stop holding on to me, for I have not yet ascended to the Father.
But go to my brothers and tell them,
‘I am going to my Father and your Father,
to my God and your God.’”
Mary Magdalene went and announced to the disciples,
“I have seen the Lord,”
and then reported what he told her.

FREE CATHOLIC MOVIES - I AM GABRIEL - DRAMA

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  Dean Cain, Gavin Casalegno, Elise Baughman |

An unforgiving sun, a parched earth, and a failed economy have left a small Texas town desolate. For ten years Promise, Texas has known nothing but one curse after another. It's barren, broken, and dying, leaving a town full of despair. When a couple finds a boy walking along a dusty road, alone in the middle of nowhere, with nothing but a mat tucked under his arm, they pick him up in hopes of helping him. What they don't realize is that he has come to help them and the residents of Promise. No one knows who he is or where he came from. Some think he's an answer to prayer. Others think he's a runaway or a false prophet. And the only thing this boy will say about himself is that he's here to help. The town's sheriff, Brody, is determined to uncover the truth. But Brody has his own problems trying to hold a dying town together. Miracle after miracle takes place and the residents of Promise embrace the boy. But when the beloved town doctor dies, it is time for the truth to be revealed. The boy pleads with Brody in front of the whole town to believe that he's come to help, not to hurt anyone. Finally, with his back against the wall the boy reveals his true identity. Written by Mike Norris


NEW KING OF BELGIUM AS FORMER ALBERT II ABDICATES

BELGIUM'S KING has abdicated the throne due to old age. King Albert II, age 79, stepped down and let his son Crown Prince Philippe be sworn in on Sunday, July 21, 2013. "I have noticed how my age and my health have not permitted me to exercise my duties the way I would like to." King Philippe is 53 and speaks both official languages of Flemish and French. He was trained in Belgium as a pilot. His wife is now Queen Mathilde. They have four children, Princess Elizabeth, Prince Emmanuel, Princess Eléonore, and Prince Gabriel. 

Here is the speech of King Philippe upon taking office:
Your Majesties, Mr. President of the Chamber of Representatives, Madam President of the Senate, Deputies, Senators, Ladies and Gentlemen,
In taking the constitutional oath before you, I am aware of the responsibility which is now incumbent upon me. This oath is a solemn promise which renews the relationship of trust that has existed for nearly two hundred years between the King and the Belgian people.
Today I am succeeding six other Kings, including my father, King Albert. Sire, for twenty years, you have maintained this trust by showing yourself to be on the one hand close to everyone, warm and profoundly human, and on the other attentive and committed in the exercising of your responsibility as Head of State. Queen Paola has assisted you in your task, whilst devoting herself more specifically to such essential fields as education and culture.
With serenity, dignity and devotion, you have accompanied the Belgian people on sometimes difficult occasions, as well as during happy moments, at a time marked by profound change throughout the world. We are most grateful to you.
I am aware of my great fortune to be able to count on the permanent support of my wife, Queen Mathilde. Dear Mathilde, for many years you have channelled your efforts wholeheartedly into numerous activities. You have an innate sense of human contact. Along with our dear children, we shall confidently begin this new chapter in our lives and that of our country.
Ladies and Gentlemen,
I am beginning my reign with the determination to place myself at the service of all Belgians. I shall therefore work in perfect understanding with the government and consistent with the Constitution. Over the years, I have been able to build ever-stronger ties with a great many of my fellow citizens. I intend to intensify this dialogue.
The wealth of our country and our institutional system resides notably in the fact that we have turned our diversity into a strength. Each time, we succeed in striking the balance between unity and diversity. Belgium’s strength is precisely its ability to give meaning to our diversity.
The latest State reform has brought about a major transfer of powers to the federated entities. It will bring citizens closer to decision making and enable us to deal more effectively with challenges in the future. Belgium’s strength also resides in its federated entities. I intend to maintain constructive contacts with their leaders. I am convinced that cooperation between the Federal State, the Communities and the Regions will bring about greater benefits for our citizens and businesses.
Together we can highlight each individual’s talents. This is the source of the genius of our country, which has developed throughout our history. It is a state of mind that has shaped our character and our values. Facing up to the most complex problems together, reconciling various aspirations and integrating them without losing any of their originality and strength has also helped forge our inventiveness and our sense of moderation.
Ladies and Gentlemen,
The values that inspire us have guided generations of men and women before us. Through their commitment in society and politics, they have ensured our country has acquired a high level of prosperity and solidarity. They have provided both a solid framework for enterprise and effective social security.
We are now confronted with a crisis that is hitting many of our fellow citizens very hard. Today I would like to encourage every man and woman to face up to this challenge. I am profoundly convinced that there is unsuspected potential in each one of us which is waiting to be revealed. Besides we have together the means to surmount our difficulties and guarantee everyone the opportunity to progress.
Now more than ever, the European project has to give us hope and confidence. The Europe we are working towards must bring growth and solidarity. We are proud that our capital city is also the capital of Europe and that at each moment in its history, Belgian leaders have worked at the heart of this great project. During my missions abroad, I have been able to observe how much Belgium’s assets, its talents and strengths are appreciated throughout the world.
Ladies and Gentlemen, this is the spirit in which I shall work during my reign.  I shall support all of our qualities, in Belgium and abroad.
Together, let us bring a new surge of enthusiasm to our country.
Long live Belgium! Vive la Belgique! Leve België! Es lebe Belgien!


COOL SURFER PRIEST FR. CALLOWAY WRITES AMAZING NEW BOOK - UNDER THE MANTLE



Under the Mantle: Marian Thoughts from a 21st Century Priest [Paperback]

Fr. Donald Calloway 


1 new from $18.95 6 used from $17.64
Under the Mantle: Marian Thoughts from a 21st Century Priest is the long-awaited book by Fr. Donald Calloway, author of the bestselling book No Turning Back: A Witness to Mercy. In Under the Mantle, Fr. Calloway deftly shares his personal insights on topics including the Eucharist, the papacy, the Church, confession, Divine Mercy, prayer, the cross, masculinity and femininity. The Blessed Virgin Mary is the central thread weaving a tapestry throughout with quotes about Our Lady from saints, blesseds, and popes. Under the Mantle is certain to become a "tour de force" Marian book for the Year of Faith!
ABOUT FR. CALLOWAY
Date of Birth: June 29, 1972 
Place of Birth: Dearborn, Michigan
Religious Community: Congregation of Marian Fathers of the Immaculate Conception of the Most Blessed Virgin Mary
Priesthood Ordination: May 31, 2003 at The National Shrine of The Divine Mercy in Stockbridge, MA
Education:

  • B.A. (Franciscan University of Steubenville)
  • M.Div. (Dominican House of Studies, Washington, DC)
  • S.T.B. (Dominican House of Studies, Washington, DC)
  • S.T.L. (International Marian Research Institute, Dayton)
Favorite Saints: Blessed Virgin Mary, St. Joseph, Guardian Angel, St. Michael the Archangel
Favorite Devotions: Rosary, Divine Mercy
Favorite Books: True Devotion to Mary (St. Louis de Montfort),
The World's First Love (Fulton J. Sheen), Diary of St. Faustina
Favorite Sacred Places: Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore in Rome, Shrine of Our Lady of Lichen in Poland
Favorite Secular Places: San Diego, New Zealand, Scotland, Canadian Rockies, Glacier National Park (Montana),
Grand Cayman Island
Favorite Hobby: Surfing!


Praise for Under the Mantle! 
We are living in an extraordinary time of grace and mercy. It is a time in which many people, through the intercession of the Blessed Virgin Mary, are experiencing a renewed appreciation for the sacred and unchanging truths of Catholicism. Though the vast majority of universities and colleges today indoctrinate their students into the dictatorship of moral relativism, the media puts forth an ideology of rampant secularism, and the political realm is filled with proponents of a culture of death, nevertheless, it is in these times that Jesus, through the Immaculata, is raising up a new generation of Catholics. In Under the Mantle: Marian Thoughts from a 21st Century Priest, Fr. Calloway masterfully blends together aspects of his own conversion story with profound theological insights into Catholicism, presenting everyone from "Joe six-pack in the pew" to a seminary rector with incredibly vivid and thought-provoking analogies into why it is so important for a Christian to live under the mantle of Mary. I very highly recommend that everyone read this book! 

-Very Rev. Douglas Mosey, C.S.B., Ph.D. President-Rector 
Holy Apostles College & Seminary. Cromwell, CT



One of the biggest challenges facing Catholics today is the risk of becoming jaded, lukewarm, disillusioned, or unenthused about their Catholic faith. Indeed, not being madly in love with Jesus, Mary, and the Church is an increasing threat in the lives of many today. For this reason, this book could not have come at a better time. In this book Fr. Calloway weaves both his personal conversion story and love for Our Lady with wave after wave of fascinating insights into the Catholic faith, offering the reader ample reasons for rediscovering and falling back in love with the saving mysteries of Catholicism. This book is a must read for all! 

-Derry Connolly, Ph.D. President
John Paul the Great Catholic University. San Diego, CA



Raw, unapologetic, and inspiring! A book that is easily understood, yet delving deep, beyond the litany of filters, and challenging spiritually hungry souls to wake up. A truly unique and extraordinary Marian gem for the New Evangelization. You will be thanked when you pass it on! 

-Milanka Lachman, L.H.S. Founder & President 
206 Tours (Catholic Pilgrimages). Hauppauge, NY


TOP 10 CATHOLIC UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES OF NORTH AMERICA


In order to promote Catholic Education JESUSCARITASEST.ORG, Daily News, will feature  A Catholic Educational Institution GUIDE YEARLY. These Colleges and Universities are in no particular order since they serve different needs, talents and gifts. They have been chosen from an examination of numerous Catholic guides of Catholic higher education. Please note that these are only accredited universities.
POPE JOHN PAUL II's encyclical on Education states:  

In the world today, characterized by such rapid developments in science and technology, the tasks of a Catholic University assume an ever greater importance and urgency. Scientific and technological discoveries create an enormous economic and industrial growth, but they also inescapably require the correspondingly necessary search for meaning in order to guarantee that the new discoveries be used for the authentic good of individuals and of human society as a whole. If it is the responsibility of every University to search for such meaning, a Catholic University is called in a particular way to respond to this need: its Christian inspiration enables it to include the moral, spiritual and religious dimension in its research, and to evaluate the attainments of science and technology in the perspective of the totality of the human person.
EX CORDE ECCLESIAE 
http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/john_paul_ii/apost_constitutions/documents/hf_jp-ii_apc_15081990_ex-corde-ecclesiae_en.html

1. AVE MARIA UNIVERSITY 
 Ave Maria University is a vibrant university located in beautiful southwest Florida. It is an academic institution that pledges faithfulness to the teachings of the Church and is committed to offering one of the finest classical liberal arts curricula available, as well as opportunities for specialized study in all of the sciences, social sciences, and humanities.
Ave Maria University
5050 Ave Maria Blvd.
Ave Maria, FL 34142



SEE http://jceworld.blogspot.ca/2011/10/america-usa-ave-maria-university.html
2. CATHOLIC DISTANCE UNIVERSITY:
CDU was founded in 1983 as the first catechetical institute in the United States to award the Catechetical Diploma and teach the Catholic faith to adults using distance education. 2008 marked CDU’s 25th year as a Catholic institution of higher learning. Location: The school’s academic and administrative offices are located in Hamilton, Virginia, about 50 miles west of Washington, DC. CDU students are located in all 50 states and over 40 countries.
Chairman of the Board: The Most Reverend Paul S. Loverde, DD
Contact Information: Our web site can be reached at http://www.cdu.edu/ . Contact us at admissions@cdu.edu , 1.888.254.4238 ext. 700 or you can write CDU at 120 East Colonial Highway, Hamilton, VA 20158.
SEE: http://jesuscaritasest.blogspot.ca/2010/03/catholic-world-news-wed-march-10-2010.html
3.
CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA: Located near the heart of Washington, D.C., The Catholic University of America is unique as the national University of the Catholic Church and the only higher education institution founded by the U.S. bishops. It is committed to being a comprehensive Catholic and American institution of higher learning.
Today the private and coeducational campus has approximately 3,694 undergraduate and 3,144 graduate students from all 50 states and 86 countries enrolled in 12 schools of architecture and planning, arts and sciences, business and economics, canon law, engineering, law, music, nursing, philosophy, professional studies, social service, and theology and religious studies. Eighty percent of undergraduates and 57 percent of graduate students are Catholic.

School of Architecture and Planning

School of Arts and Sciences

School of Arts and Sciences

School of Business and Economics

School of Engineering

Benjamin T. Rome School of Music

School of Nursing

School of Philosophy

National Catholic School of Social Service

Pre-Professional Studies

Metropolitan School of Professional Studies
  • General Contact Information
  • The Catholic University of America
    620 Michigan Ave., N.E.
    Washington, DC 20064
    Phone: 202-319-5000






4. JOHN PAUL THE GREAT CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY

JP CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY RELEASE: John Paul the Great Catholic University, which opened in September 2006, is a visionary teaching institution focused on and dedicated to molding students into future innovators and creators, leaders and entrepreneurs. Students have the opportunity to acquire a deep and personal knowledge of Jesus Christ. Catholic ethical, moral, and social values provide a guiding compass for everything we do.
SEE: http://jceworld.blogspot.ca/2011/11/america-usa-john-paul-great-university.html
5. FRANCISCAN UNIVERSITY OF STEUBENVILLE





Why Franciscan? Get the Facts

Our 42 undergraduate majors and 32 minors, as well as seven graduate programs, offer a variety of academic challenges within the spirit of Christian humanism that educates you as a whole person. Inside and outside the classroom, you’ll experience the joy-filled Franciscan spirituality that enables you to answer the call of the Holy Father to evangelize the culture through volunteer work, mission trips, and community service. Our dynamic campus life, where unique faith “households” create a family away from home and lifelong connections, encourages your participation in everything from intramural sports and NCAA Division III athletics to Chapel Ministries, student government, clubs, and organizations for faith, fun, and friendship.
Admissions Office
1235 University Boulevard
Steubenville, Ohio 43952
800-783-6220 toll-free
740-283-6226 voice
740-284-5456 fax
admissions@franciscan.edu
www.franciscan.edu
SEE : http://jceworld.blogspot.ca/2011/09/america-usa-franciscan-university.html
6. REDEEMER PACIFIC COLLEGE CANADA
Redeemer Pacific College (RPC) is a Catholic liberal arts college with a unique partnership with Trinity Western University (TWU), providing students with a solid foundation in Catholic liberal arts as they work towards an undergraduate degree in any one of the 40 + undergraduate majors offered by TWU. RPC functions in fidelity to the teaching authority of the Catholic Church as we lead our students to grow in knowledge and love of Christ and His Church.
http://www.redeemerpacific.ca/
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SEE http://jceworld.blogspot.ca/2012/06/america-featured-university-redeemer.html
7. ST. THOMAS AQUINAS COLLEGE

Campus Beauty Shot
It Roman Catholic with Lay Administration. They offer Bachelor of Arts degree.
Tuition$22,850
Room & Board$7,550
Other Costs$450 (books & supplies, no additional fees)

10,000 Ojai Road, Santa Paula, California 93060
(805) 525-4417 | contact
map
http://www.thomasaquinas.edu/
8. DE SALES UNIVERSITY 
Affiliation
A private, four-year Catholic university for men and women administered by the Oblates of St. Francis de Sales. http://www.desales.edu/
Student/Faculty Ratio
15:1

Average Class Size
18

Enrollment 
1,576 full-time undergraduate day students. Total full-time enrollment for traditional, graduate, and evening
(ACCESS) students: 2,468.

Student Profile
45% male, 55% female; 11% minority; 24 states and 4 other countries represented.
Faculty 
103 full-time faculty members; 76% have the highest degree attainable in their field.

Center Valley Campus
DeSales University
2755 Station Avenue
Center Valley, PA 18034
Telephone: 610.282.1100

Expenses (2011-2012)

Tuition$28,000
Room & Board$10,520
Student & Technology Fee$1,200
Total$39,720


SEE http://jceworld.blogspot.ca/2011/12/america-usa-university-featured-de.html
9. HOLY APOSTLES COLLEGE AND SEMINARY
Holy Apostles College and Seminary is Approved by The Cardinal Newman Society. Holy Apostle's commitment to fostering a strong sense of Catholic identity.
CONTACT:
Holy Apostles College & Seminary - 33 Prospect Hill Road Cromwell, CT 06416-2027, USA


HOLY APOSTLES WEBSITE: Holy Apostles College & Seminary is a regionally accredited, co-educational Catholic college located in historic Cromwell, Connecticut. We welcome and serve lay commuter students, distance learning students, as well as seminarians.
We offer undergraduate, graduate, and seminary degrees in philosophy & theology, in on-campus, on-line, and blended formats.

SEE: http://jceworld.blogspot.ca/2011/10/america-usa-holy-apostles-college.html
10. 

CHRISTENDOM COLLEGE 

Basic Statistical Data for the 2012-2013 Undergraduate Academic Year 

Religious Affiliation: Roman Catholic
Year Founded: 1977
Degrees: Associate of Arts (A.A.), Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), Master of Arts (M.A.)
Total Undergraduates: 388 (from 45 States and 5 foreign countries)
Male/Female Ratio: 42:58

Freshman Class Stats: 105 freshmen:
48% are siblings of either current Christendom students or alumni, 13% are legacy students, 47% attended one of the College's Summer Programs, from 33 US States, UK, Canada, Greece, and Ireland, 35% of them are on academic scholarship.
Freshman SAT Midranges: 
Reading: 560-700
Math: 510-640
Writing: 570-690
Average SAT score: 1820
Tuition: $21,000
Room & Board: $7,970
Freshman Retention Rate: 83%
Graduation Rate: 69% 4 years 70% 6 years
% Courses with fewer than 20 students: 59%
Student/Faculty Ratio: 14:1
% Courses Taught by Our Graduate Students: 0
3 Most Popular Majors: History, Philosophy, Political Science
% Students Living on Campus: 95%
% Students receiving need-based financial aid: 51%
% Students receiving need-based or merit-based aid: 75%
Acceptance Rate: 80%
Yield Rate:
 51%

 

What is Christendom College?

Christendom College is a four-year coeducational Roman Catholic Liberal Arts College with undergraduate and graduate programs offered on three campuses in Front Royal and Alexandria, Virginia, and Rome, Italy.
Founded in 1977 in response to the devastating blow inflicted on Catholic higher education by the cultural revolution which swept across America in the 1960s, Christendom's goal is to provide a truly Catholic education in fidelity to the Magisterium of the Catholic Church and thereby to prepare students for their role of restoring all things in Christ.

Mailing Addresses

Front Royal Campus
Christendom College
Recipient's Name
Department/Office
134 Christendom Drive
Front Royal, VA 22630-6534
Alexandria Campus (Graduate School)
Christendom Graduate School
Recipient's Name
4407 Sano Street
Alexandria, VA 22312-1555


Phone


Main Number: 800.877.5456 or 540.636.2900
Fax: 540.636.1655 / Email
EMAIL US YOUR SUGGESTIONS OF CATHOLIC UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES @
jesuscaritasest@gmail.com

POPE FRANCIS LISTEN TO THE VOICE OF JESUS - SUNDAY ANGELUS MESSAGE

Vatican Radio REPORT: On the eve of his departure to Brazil for the World Youth Day celebrations in Rio de Janeiro, Pope Francis from the window of the apostolic palace asked those present in St Peter’s Square to accompany him spiritually in prayer for this his first Apostolic visit He also entrusted what he called “this new stage of the great pilgrimage of young people across the world”, to the intercession of the Blessed Virgin Mary, who he added, is so loved and venerated in Brazil. 
The Holy Father was speaking following the recitation of the Angelus underlining that at this time, young people should listen to the voice of Jesus. The week of World Youth Day said the Pope could also be called “World Youth Week as it is a week devoted to youth.
Peering down at the huge crowds in St Peter’s Square Pope Francis noticed a banner held up by a group of pilgrims, which read “Buon Viaggio” or “have a good trip”. He smiled and thanked them for their good wishes.

The Pope on Sunday also focused his attention on the Gospel reading from Luke which recounts the story of Martha and Mary and their brother Lazarus.
Pope Francis described how both sisters offered hospitality to Jesus on his visit to their house, but in different ways. Mary places herself at the feet of Jesus while Martha is busy preparing things.
The Holy Father explained that both of these disciplines, service and prayer are needed to serve the Lord, “they are not two opposing attitudes but, on the contrary both are two aspects essential to our Christian life aspects that should never be separated, but lived in profound unity and harmony.”
Even in our Christian lives, continued the Pope, prayer and action are always deeply united. A prayer that does not lead to concrete action towards a poor brother, who is sick, and in need of help, is a prayer that is sterile and incomplete. But, equally, Pope Francis said, when in ecclesial service you are careful only to give more attention to objects, functions, and structures, and forget the centrality of Christ, you are likely to serve these earthy things and not God.
At the end of the Angelus Pope Francis as has become traditional wished all present a good Sunday and a good lunch.
SHARED FROM RADIO VATICANA

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