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Monday, June 3, 2013

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2013








POPE FRANCIS REMEMBERS POPE BLESSED JOHN XXIII AND LATEST FROM VATICAN 
FREE CATHOLIC MOVIES - THE LION, THE WITCH AND THE WARDROBE - CHRONICLES OF NARNIA PART 1
PEACEFUL CHURCH GATHERING ATTACKED IN ZAMBIA - AFRICA
NEW FILM - "A FORBIDDEN GOD" ON 51 CLARETIANS MARTYRED
PRO-LIFE ORGANIZATION THAT WORKS WITH STUDENTS TO SAVE LIVES
 TODAY'S SAINT : JUNE 3 : ST. CHARLES LWANGA AND MARTYRS OF UGANDA
TODAY'S SAINT : JUNE 3 : ST. CLOTILDE 
ADORATION WITH POPE FRANCIS LIVE FROM VATICAN WORLDWIDE - VIDEO
Vatican Radio REPORT: Pope Francis addressed a group of pilgrims from the Italian diocese of Bergamo on Monday evening in St Peter's Basilica, where they had gathered to mark the 50th anniversary of the passing of one of their most illustrious sons, Blessed Pope John XXIII. Below, please find Vatican Radio's English translation of the Holy Father's prepared remarks.

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Dear friends of the Diocese of Bergamo,

I am pleased to welcome you here, at the tomb of the Apostle Peter, in this place that is home to every Catholic. I affectionately greet your Pastor, Bishop Francesco Beschi, and thank him for the kind words he addressed to me on behalf of all.

Exactly fifty years ago, just at this moment, Blessed John XXIII left this world. Those who, like me, [are of] a certain age, retain a vivid memory of the commotion that spread everywhere in those days: St. Peter’s Square had become a sanctuary in the open, day and night welcoming the faithful of all ages and social conditions, in trepidation and prayer for the Pope's health. The whole world had recognized in Pope John a pastor and a father: a shepherd because [he was] father. What made him such? How could he reach the hearts of so many different people, even many non-Christians? To answer this question, we can refer to his episcopal motto, oboedientia et pax: obedience and peace. “These words,” noted the then-Archbishop Roncalli on the eve of his episcopal ordination, “are [in a way] my story and my life.” (Journal of a Soul, retreat in preparation for consecration as bishop, 13-17 March 1925).

I would like to begin from peace, because this is the most obvious aspect – that, which people perceived in Pope John: Angelo Roncalli was a man who was able to communicate peace; a natural, serene, friendly, peace; a peace that, with his election to the Pontificate, was manifested to all the world and [came to be called his] ‘goodness’. This was undoubtedly a hallmark of his personality, which enabled him to build strong friendships everywhere and in particular that stood out in his ministry as Representative of the Pope, which he carried out for nearly three decades, often in contact with environments and worlds far removed from that Catholic universe in which he was born and formed. It was in those environments that he proved an effective weaver of relationships and a good promoter of unity, inside and outside the Church community, open to dialogue with Christians of other Churches, with members of the Jewish and Muslim [traditions] and with many other men of good will. In fact, Pope John conveyed peace because he had a mind deeply at peace, the fruit of a long and challenging work on himself, an effort that has left abundant traces in [his autobiography], Journal of a Soul. There we can see the seminarian, the priest, the bishop Roncalli struggling with the path to the gradual purification of the heart. We see him, day by day, careful to recognize and mortify the desires that come from his own selfishness, careful to discern the inspirations of the Lord, allowing himself to be guided by wise spiritual directors and inspired by masters such as Saint Francis de Sales and St. Charles Borromeo. Reading those writings, we truly see a soul taking shape, under the action of the Holy Spirit working in His Church.

Here, then, we come to the second and decisive word: “obedience.” If peace was the outward hallmark, obedience constituted for [Pope John] the inner disposition: obedience, in fact, was the instrument with which to achieve peace. Firstly, [obedience] meant to [Pope John] something very simple and concrete: performing that service in the Church, which his superiors asked of him, without seeking anything for himself, with no escape from anything that was required of him, even when it meant leaving his homeland, dealing with worlds unknown to him, remaining for many years in places where the presence of Catholics was very scarce. This willingness to be led, like a child, built his priestly path, of which you are well aware: from secretary of Bishop Radini Tedeschi and at the same time teacher and spiritual father in the diocesan seminary; to [his service as] Papal Representative in Bulgaria, Turkey and Greece, France; [his election as] Shepherd of the Venetian Church, and finally as Bishop of Rome. Through this obedience, the priest and bishop Roncalli, however, also lived a more profound faithfulness, which could be called, as he would say, abandonment to Divine Providence. He always recognized, in faith, that through that path of life apparently driven by others, led by their tastes or on the basis of their own spiritual sensitivity, God was designing a project of His own.

Even more profoundly, through this daily abandonment to the will of God, the future Pope John lived a purification, which allowed him to detach himself completely from himself, and to adhere to Christ, thus allowing the holiness to emerge, which the Church has [now] officially recognized. Jesus tells us, “Whoever loses his life for me will save it. (Lk 9:24)” Here is the true wellspring of Pope John’s, of the peace that he sowed throughout the world. Here is the root of his holiness: in this, his evangelical obedience.

This, then, is a lesson for all of us, and also for the Church of our time. If we let ourselves be led by the Holy Spirit, if we mortify our selfishness to make room for the love of the Lord and to His will, then we will find peace, then we will be builders of peace and peace will spread around us. Fifty years after his death, the wise and fatherly guidance of Pope John, his love for the Church’s tradition and awareness of the constant need of renovation, the prophetic intuition of the convocation of the II Vatican Council and the offering of his life for its success, remain as milestones in the history of the Church of the twentieth century and as a beacon of light for the journey that lies ahead.

Dear people of Bergamo, you are rightly proud of the “Good Pope”, a shining example of faith and virtues for whole generations of Christians from your land. Keep his spirit, continue to deepen the study of his life and his writings, but above all, imitate his holiness. From heaven, may he continue to accompany with love your Church, which he so loved in life, and may he obtain for her from the Lord the gift of many holy priests, vocations to religious and missionary life, as well as to family life and for lay commitment [to service] in the Church and in the world. Thank you for your visit! I cordially bless you.

 




SHARED FROM RADIO VATICANA

MONDAY MORNING MASS WITH POPE FRANCIS
Sinners, the corrupt, and saints: Pope Francis focused on these three groups in his homily for Mass Monday morning in at the Casa Santa Marta. The Pope said the corrupt do great harm to the Church because they are worshipers of themselves; the saints, on the other hand, do great good, they are lights in the Church.

What happens when we want to become the owners of the vineyard? The parable of the wicked tenants in Monday's Gospel reading provided the starting point for Pope Francis’ homily, which focused on “the three models of Christians in the Church: sinners, corrupt persons; and the saints.” The Pope noted that “there is no need to talk too much about sinners, because we are all sinners." "We recognize this from the inside,” he continued, “and we know what a sinner is. If any one of us does not feel that way, he should make a visit to a spiritual doctor” because “something is wrong.” The parable, however, presents us with another figure, the figure of those who want “to take possession of the vineyard, and who have lost the relationship with the Master of the vineyard,” a Master who, “has called us with love, who protects us, but who then gives us freedom.” Those who would take possession of the vineyard, “think they are strong, they think they are independent of God”:

“These, slowly, slipped on that autonomy, that independence in their relationship with God: ‘We don’t need that Master, who shouldn’t come and disturb us!’ And we go forward with this. These are the corrupt! These were sinners like all of us, but they have taken a step beyond that, as if they were confirmed in their sin: they don’t need God! But it only seems so, for in their genetic code there is this relationship with God. And since they can’t deny this, they make a special god: they themselves are god. They are corrupt.”
“This is a danger for us, too,” he added. In the “Christian communities,” he said, the corrupt think only of their own group: “Good, good. It’s about us - they think - but, in fact, ‘they are only out for themselves”:

Judas [was the first]: from a greedy sinner, he ended in corruption. The road of autonomy is a dangerous road: the corrupt are very forgetful, have forgotten this love, with which the Lord made the vineyard, has made them! They severed the relationship with this love! And they become worshipers of themselves. How bad are the corrupt in the Christian community! May the Lord deliver us from sliding down this road of corruption.”

The Pope spoke also of the saints, remembering that today is the fiftieth anniversary of the death of Bd Pope John XXIII, “a model of holiness.” In the day's Gospel, he added, the saints are those who “go to collect the rent” on the vineyard. “They know what is expected of them, but they must do it, and they do their duty”:

“The saints are those who obey the Lord, those who worship the Lord, those who have not lost the memory of the love with which the Lord has made the vineyard: the saints in the Church. Just as the corrupt do so much harm to the Church, the saints do so much good. The apostle John says of the corrupt that they are the antichrist, that they are among us, but they are not of us. About the saints, the Word of God tells us they are like light, ‘that they will be before the throne of God in adoration.’ Today we ask the Lord for the grace to understand that we are sinners, but truly sinners, not sinners broadly, but sinners with regard to this, that, and the other thing, concrete sins, with the concreteness of sin. The grace to not become corrupt: sinners, yes; corrupt, no! And the grace to walk in the paths of holiness. So be it.”
Cardinal Angelo Amato, the head of the Congregation for the Causes of Saints, concelebrated the Mass, which was attended by a group of priests and collaborators from the Congregation, as well as a group of Gentlemen of His Holiness.

SHARED FROM RADIO VATICANA

FREE CATHOLIC MOVIES - THE LION, THE WITCH AND THE WARDROBE - CHRONICLES OF NARNIA PART 1

IN HONOR OF THE YEAR OF FAITH JCE NEWS will be showing some of the Best Catholic Films of all time. Here is the drama of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, PART 1 in English :
PLEASE CLICK LINK IF PLAYER DOES NOT WORK :
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tFoSFfYj5Eg

PEACEFUL CHURCH GATHERING ATTACKED IN ZAMBIA - AFRICA

Agenzia Fides REPORT- "The Oasis Forum and its constituent members are appalled and shocked by the behavior of the Patriotic Front (PF, the ruling party) cadres who attacked a peaceful gathering of several civil society organizations, on 31 May 2013, inside the Church of the Bible Gospel Outreach Church in Africa (BIGOCA) situated in Matero township in Lusaka." This was reported in a statement sent to Fides Agency. The Oasis Forum comprises all the main Christian denominations in Zambia. The statement was signed by the Catholic Church by Fr. Cleophas Lungu, Secretary General of the Episcopal Conference of Zambia.
"The consortium of civil society, exercising their rights, were gathered to pray and peacefully protest the Government’s removal of subsidies on Maize meal, agriculture and fuel," says the statement that entirely rejects the responsibility of the incident on the leaders of the PF.
"That PF cadres, weilding sticks and all manner of offensive instruments descended upon innocent citizens, Church leaders, journalists, cameramen and some politicians in a Church, is unprecedented and totally shocking" said the statement that accuses the attackers of having committed a "pre-meditated and planned act of violence "
The Oasis Forum recalls of having "lamented the diminishing space for dissent in Zambia. Citizens and opposition political parties must be accorded legitimate space to register different opinions, for example, through peaceful protests."
Once again, we call upon the Zambia police to be impartial and to protect all citizens at all times. The manner in which the Zambia Police currently operates leaves much to be desired, " the statement concluded. (L.M.)

NEW FILM - "A FORBIDDEN GOD" ON 51 CLARETIANS MARTYRED


Catholic Communications, Sydney Archdiocese,
3 Jun 2013
In 1936, at the beginning of the Spanish Civil War, the Claretian religious community of Barbastro was attacked by militants. An assembly hall became their jail, where they were pressured to renounce their faith. 
"I'm worried about you, Father: the guards say you keep praying the Rosary out loud."
"But why does it annoy them if I pray?"
The men wouldn't give up, and in the end they paid with their lives. The movie 'Un Dios Prohibido', which translates to 'A Forbidden God', recounts the story a group of 51 Claretians, just weeks before they were all shot to death.
PABLO MORENO
Director, 'Un Dios Prohibido'
"We want to express the truth about these men, their truth. It's about their coherent life, the way they defended their own faith even in the most extreme conditions. They were kept prisoners for many days and knew that in the end they would probably die."
The film's presentation in Rome was attended by Spanish Cardinal Santos Abril and the superiors of the Claretian community. According to the director, the movie isn't about blame, but about forgiveness and respect.
PABLO MORENO
Director, 'Un Dios Prohibido'
"The Spanish Civil War and especially religious persecution have been a point of conflict in Spain for decades. I find the theme of forgiveness and reconciliation very interesting. At the end of the day, they are perfectly valid ideals and especially nowadays, in a democratic society where all ideals have their own place. What must not happen is the imposition of any of these ideals by violence."
One of the protagonists is trade union leader Eugenio Sopena, who says he was personally touched by the martyr's hardships.
JACOBO MUÑOZ
Actor, 'Un Dios Prohibido'
"My character believes in his own values, but there comes a point where he questions everything. He clashes with the world and with what his superiors ask of him. And he doesn't really know where to go or what to do. (FLASH) 04,40 - 04,56 "These people died forgiving the people who killed them. That's impressive. I do not know if  today anyone would do that, to forgive someone who is harming them."
'Un Dios prohibido' will be released in theaters next summer. It will also be screened in cinemas in Brazil, during World Youth Day in Rio de Janeiro.


shared from ARCHDIOCESE OF SYDNEY

PRO-LIFE ORGANIZATION THAT WORKS WITH STUDENTS TO SAVE LIVES


Cover Photo

WEBSITE OF NCLN: National Campus Life Network is the only national organization that exists to educate, network and support post-secondary pro-life students across Canada.

Nowhere is there a greater urgency for the pro-life message than on the university campus. The university is the place where the ideas and values of our society take root. An active pro-life presence is needed to promote ideas and values that embrace the objective truth that all human life is worthy of protection.
What is NCLN?
  • National Campus Life Network is the only national organization that exists to educate, network and support post-secondary pro-life students across Canada. We work to maximize the promotion and effectiveness of the pro-life message on campus, while minimizing the excess work for busy students.
  • Nowhere is there a greater urgency for the pro-life message than on the university campus. The university is the place where the ideas and values of our society take root. An active pro-life presence is needed to promote ideas and values that embrace the objective truth that all human life is worthy of protection.

How do we do it?

NCLN works to promote the formation of new pro-life educational campus clubs and assists already-formed clubs through:
Education:
  1. Face-to-face campus visits that include pro-life apologetics.
  2. Resources specifically tailored for the university environment.
  3. An annual national Symposium.
Networking
  1. An interactive Facebook group.
  2. Listing of campus groups.
  3. An annual national Symposium with student leaders from across the country.
Support
  1. How-to guides for running a club.
  2. Continual contact between NCLN Staff and students.
  3. Leadership and skills development.

Why is campus life advocacy important?

  • Today’s students are tomorrow’s leaders:
    1. Popular campus philosophy does not affirm the inherent dignity of the human person.
    2. The university environment significantly impacts one’s view on abortion. In an Angus Reid Poll that was conducted in June 2008, support for abortion in any circumstance jumps from a minority, 33% of high school graduates, to a majority, 66% of university graduates.
  • This age demographic is most impacted:
    1. 54.4% of all abortions are performed on university aged women (18-29 years) according to Statistics Canada.
    2. Students often feel that they must choose between school or parenting.
  • We advocate: a world where everyone has a true right to life, even if they are labelled “defective” or “unwanted.” Where everyone is valued for who they are, not for what they can do.

When did we begin?

In January of 1997, the National Campus Life Network was formed by a group of 40 post-secondary students who organized and attended the first annual National Symposium in Toronto. The goal was to equip pro-life students across the country for campus life advocacy, and network them with each other and the broader pro-life movement.
Today the National Campus Life Network supports over 30 campus pro-life groups across Canada. NCLN plays an important role in mentoring new leaders into the pro-life movement.

NCLN is on the front lines bringing the pro-life message to our culture and we need you to join us. We are successfully expanding the reach of the pro-life message on university campuses.
Please consider supporting NCLN’s work through a one-time or regular financial contribution.
Currently, along with cheques, we are able to accept VISA and MasterCard payments.  You can also donate online through Paypal here:


For cheques, please mail them to one of our regional offices.
If you would like your donation to go to a specific staff member or NCLN office, please send an email to info@ncln.ca with the subject ‘PayPal Donation’ and indicate to whom or to what office you would like to support.
SHARED FROM NCLN

TODAY'S SAINT : JUNE 3 : ST. CHARLES LWANGA AND MARTYRS OF UGANDA

Sts. Charles Lwanga, Joseph Mkasa, Martyrs of Uganda
MARTYRS
Feast: June 3


Information:
Feast Day:June 3
Born:Buganda, Uganda
Died:June 3, 1886, Namugongo, Uganda
Canonized:October 18, 1964 by Pope Paul VI
Major Shrine:Basilica Church of the Uganda Martyrs, Namugongo
Patron of:African Catholic Youth Action, converts, torture victims
In the interior of central Africa the first Catholic missions were established by Cardinal Lavigerie's White Fathers in 1879. In Uganda some progress was made under the not unfriendly local ruler, Mtesa; but his successor, Mwanga, determined to root out Christianity among his people, especially after a Catholic subject, St. Joseph Mkasa, reproached him for his debauchery and for his massacre of the Protestant missionary James Hannington and his caravan. Mwanga was addicted to unnatural vice and his anger against Christianity, already kindled by ambitious officers who played on his fears, was kept alight by the refusal of Christian boys in his service to minister to his wickedness.

Joseph Mkasa himself was the first victim: Mwanga. seized on a trifling pretext and on November 15, 1885, had him beheaded. To the chieftain's astonishment the Christians were not cowed by this sudden outrage, and in May of the following year the storm burst. When he called for a young 'page' called Mwafu, Mwanga learned that he had been receiving religious instruction from another page, St. Denis Sebuggwawo; Denis was sent for, and the king thrust a spear through his throat. That night guards were posted round the royal residence to prevent anyone from escaping.

St. Charles Lwanga, who had succeeded Joseph Mkasa in charge of the 'pages', secretly baptized four of them who were catechumens; among them St Kizito, a boy of thirteen whom Lwanga had repeatedly saved from the designs of the king. Next morning the pages were all drawn up before Mwanga, and Christians were ordered to separate themselves from the rest: led by Lwanga and Kizito, the oldest and youngest, they did so—fifteen young men, all under twenty-five years of age. They were joined by two others already under arrest and by two soldiers. Mwanga asked them if they intended to remain Christians. "Till death!" came the response. "Then put them to death!"

The appointed place of execution, Namugongo, was thirty-seven miles away, and the convoy set out at once. Three of the youths were killed on the road; the others underwent a cruel imprisonment of seven days at Namugongo while a huge pyre was prepared. Then on Ascension day, June 3, 1886, they were brought out, stripped of their clothing, bound, and each wrapped in a mat of reed: the living faggots were laid on the pyre (one boy, St Mbaga, was first killed by a blow on the neck by order of his father who was the chief executioner), and it was set alight. The persecution spread and Protestants as well as Catholics gave their lives rather than deny Christ. A leader among the confessors was St Matthias Murumba, who was put to death with revolting cruelty; he was a middle-aged man, assistant judge to the provincial chief, who first heard of Jesus Christ from Protestant missionaries and later was baptized by Father Livinhac, W.F. Another older victim, who was beheaded, was St Andrew Kagwa, chief of Kigowa, who had been the instrument of his wife's conversion and had gathered a large body of catechumens round him. This Andrew together with Charles Lwanga and Matthias Murumba and nineteen others (seventeen of the total being young royal servants) were solemnly beatified in 1920. They were canonized in 1964.

When the White Fathers were expelled from the country, the new Christians carried on their work, translating and printing the catechism into their nativel language and giving secret instruction on the faith. Without priests, liturgy, and sacraments their faith, intelligence, courage, and wisdom kept the Catholic Church alive and growing in Uganda. When the White Fathers returned after King Mwanga's death, they found five hundred Christians and one thousand catchumens waiting for them.


SOURCE: http://www.ewtn.com/saintsHoly/saints/C/stcharleslwanga_josephmkasa.asp#ixzz1wkVXYngH

TODAY'S SAINT : JUNE 3 : ST. CLOTILDE

St. Clotilde
QUEEN
Feast: June 3


Information:
Feast Day:June 3
Born:475, Lyon, France
Died:545, Tours, France
Patron of:brides, adopted children, parents, exiles, widows
Was daughter of Chilperic, younger brother to Gondebald, the tyrannical king of Burgundy, who put him, his wife, and the rest of his brothers, except one, to death, in order to usurp their dominions. In this massacre he spared Chilperic's two fair daughters, then in their infancy. One of them became afterwards a nun; the other, named Clotildis, was brought up in her uncle's court, and by a singular providence, was instructed in the Catholic religion, though she was educated in the midst of Arians. It was her happiness in the true faith, to be inspired from the cradle with a contempt and disgust of a treacherous world, which sentiments she cherished and improved by the most fervent exercises of religion. Though she saw herself surrounded with all the charms of the world, and was from her infancy its idol, yet her heart was proof against its seductions. She was adorned with the assemblage of all virtues; and the reputation of her wit, beauty, meekness, modesty, and piety, made her the adoration of all the neighboring kingdoms, when Clovis I., surnamed the great, the victorious king of the Franks, demanded and obtained her of her uncle in marriage granting her all the conditions she could desire for the free and secure exercise of her religion.1 The marriage was solemnized at Soissons, in 493. Clotildis made herself a little oratory in the royal palace, in which she spent much time in fervent prayer and secret mortifications. Her devotion was tempered with discretion, so that she attended all her business at court, was watchful over her maids, and did every thing with a dignity, order, and piety, which edified and charmed the king and his whole court. Her charity to the poor seemed a sea which could never be drained. She honored her royal husband, studied to sweeten his warlike temper by Christian meekness, conformed herself to his humor in things that were indifferent; and, the better to gain his affections, made those things the subject of her discourse and praises in which she saw him to take the greatest delight. When she saw herself mistress of his heart, she did not defer the great work of endeavoring to win him to God, and often spoke to him on the vanity of his idols, and on the excellency of the true religion. The king always heard her with pleasure; but the moment of his conversion was not yet come. It was first to cost her many tears, severe trials, and earnest perseverance. After the baptism of their second son, Clodomir, and the infant's recovery from a dangerous indisposition, she pressed the king more boldly to renounce his idols. One day especially, when he had given her great assurances of his affection, and augmented her dowry by a gift of several manors, she said she begged only one favor of his majesty, which was the liberty to discourse with him on the sanctity of her religion, and to put him in mind of his promise of forsaking the worship of idols. But the fear of giving offence to his people made him delay the execution. His miraculous victory over the Alemanni, and his entire conversion in 496, were at length the fruit of our saint's prayers.

Clotildis, having gained to God this great monarch, never ceased to excite him to glorious actions for the divine honor: among other religious foundations he built in Paris, at her request, about the year 511, the great church of SS. Peter and Paul, now called St. Genevieve's. This great prince had a singular devotion to St. Martin, and went sometimes to Tours, to prostrate himself in prayer at his tomb. He sent his royal diadem, which is called, to this day, The Realm, a present to pope Hormisdas, as a token that he dedicated his kingdom to God. His barbarous education and martial temper made it, in certain sallies of his passions, difficult for Clotildis to bridle his inclination to ambition and cruelty, so that he scarce left any princes of his own relations living, except his sons. He died on the 27th of November, in the year 511, of his age the forty-fifth, having reigned thirty years. He was buried in the church of the apostles, SS. Peter and Paul, now called St. Genevieve's, where his tomb still remains. An ancient long epitaph, which was inscribed on it, is preserved by Aimoinus, and copied by Rivet. His eldest son Theodoric, whom he had by a concubine before his marriage, reigned at Rheims over Austrasia, or the eastern parts of France, which comprised the present Champagne, Lorraine, Auvergne, and several provinces of Germany. Metz was afterwards the capital of this country. As to the three sons of Clotildis, Clodomir reigned at Orleans, Childebert at Paris, and Clotaire I., at Soissons. This division produced wars and mutual jealousies, till, in 560, the whole monarchy was reunited under Clotaire, the youngest of these brothers. St. Clotildis lived to see Clodomir defeat and put to death Sigismund, king of Burgundy; but soon after, in 524, himself vanquished and slain by Gondemar, successor to Sigismund; Gondemar overcome and killed by Childebert and Clotaire, and the kingdom of Burgundy united to France. The most sensible affliction of this pious queen was the murder of the two eldest sons of Clodomir, committed in 526, by their uncles Childebert and Clotaire, who seized on the kingdom of Orleans. This tragical disaster contributed more perfectly to wean her heart from the world. She spent the remaining part of her life at Tours, near the tomb of St. Martin, in exercises of prayer, almsdeeds, watching, fasting, and penance, seeming totally to forget that she had been queen, or that her sons sat on the throne. Eternity filled her heart, and employed all her thoughts. She foretold her death thirty days before it happened; having been admonished of it by God at the tomb of St. Martin, the usual place of her tears. In her last illness, she sent for her sons Childebert, king of Paris, and Clotaire, king of Soissons, and exhorted them, in the most pathetic manner, to honor God and keep his commandments; to protect the poor, reign as fathers to their people, live in union together, and love and study always to maintain tranquillity and peace. She scarce ever ceased repeating the psalms with the most tender devotion, and ordered all she had left to be distributed among she poor; though this was very little; for she had always been careful to send her riches before her by their hands. On the thirtieth day of her illness she received the sacraments, made a public confession of her faith, and departed to the Lord on the 3d of June, in 545. She was buried, by her own order, in the church of St. Genevieve, at the feet of that holy shepherdess, and is commemorated in the Roman Martyrology on the 3d of June. See St. Gregory of Tours, Hist. Franc., and Fortunatus; and among the moderns, Abbe Du Bos and Gilb. le Gendre, Antiquites de la Nation et Monarchie Francoise, & c.


source: http://www.ewtn.com/saintsHoly/saints/C/stclotilde.asp#ixzz1wkVKpiHP

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