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Thursday, March 28, 2013

CATHOLIC NEWS WORLD SPECIAL: THURS. MARCH 28, 2013 - SHARE


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(Vatican Radio IMAGE -SHARE) CHRISM MASS: POPE FRANCIS WARNS PRIESTS THAT INSATISFACTION COMES FROM NOT GOING OUT OF ONESELF
Vatican City, 28 March 2013 (VIS) –
The solemn Holy Thursday Chrism Mass celebrated in the Vatican Basilica opens the Paschal Triduum of Holy Week. During the course of the Mass, celebrated in all the churches and cathedrals throughout the world, priests renew the vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience that they made at their ordination. Also, the oil used to anoint catechumens and the oil used to anoint the sick as well as the chrism oil—olive oil scented with balsam—used to anoint those being baptised, confirmed, or receiving Holy Orders is blessed.
The Chrism Mass presided over by the Holy Father was concelebrated by the over 2,000 cardinals, archbishops, bishops, and priests present and was attended by over 10,000 faithful. 
 (Vatican Radio REPORT) Below please find the official text of Pope Francis’ Homily for Chrism Mass, Holy Thursday 2013:
Dear Brothers and Sisters, This morning I have the joy of celebrating my first Chrism Mass as the Bishop of Rome. I greet all of you with affection, especially you, dear priests, who, like myself, today recall the day of your ordination.

The readings of our Mass speak of God’s “anointed ones”: the suffering Servant of Isaiah, King David and Jesus our Lord. All three have this in common: the anointing that they receive is meant in turn to anoint God’s faithful people, whose servants they are; they are anointed for the poor, for prisoners, for the oppressed… A fine image of this “being for” others can be found in the Psalm: “It is like the precious oil upon the head, running down upon the beard, on the beard of Aaron, running down upon the collar of his robe” (Ps 133:2). The image of spreading oil, flowing down from the beard of Aaron upon the collar of his sacred robe, is an image of the priestly anointing which, through Christ, the Anointed One, reaches the ends of the earth, represented by the robe.

The sacred robes of the High Priest are rich in symbolism. One such symbol is that the names of the children of Israel were engraved on the onyx stones mounted on the shoulder-pieces of the ephod, the ancestor of our present-day chasuble: six on the stone of the right shoulder-piece and six on that of the left (cf. Ex 28:6-14). The names of the twelve tribes of Israel were also engraved on the breastplate (cf. Es 28:21). This means that the priest celebrates by carrying on his shoulders the people entrusted to his care and bearing their names written in his heart. When we put on our simple chasuble, it might well make us feel, upon our shoulders and in our hearts, the burdens and the faces of our faithful people, our saints and martyrs of whom there are many in these times…

From the beauty of all these liturgical things, which is not so much about trappings and fine fabrics than about the glory of our God resplendent in his people, alive and strengthened, we turn to a consideration of activity, action. The precious oil which anoints the head of Aaron does more than simply lend fragrance to his person; it overflows down to “the edges”. The Lord will say this clearly: his anointing is meant for the poor, prisoners and the sick, for those who are sorrowing and alone. The ointment is not intended just to make us fragrant, much less to be kept in a jar, for then it would become rancid … and the heart bitter.

A good priest can be recognized by the way his people are anointed. This is a clear test. When our people are anointed with the oil of gladness, it is obvious: for example, when they leave Mass looking as if they have heard good news. Our people like to hear the Gospel preached with “unction”, they like it when the Gospel we preach touches their daily lives, when it runs down like the oil of Aaron to the edges of reality, when it brings light to moments of extreme darkness, to the “outskirts” where people of faith are most exposed to the onslaught of those who want to tear down their faith. People thank us because they feel that we have prayed over the realities of their everyday lives, their troubles, their joys, their burdens and their hopes. And when they feel that the fragrance of the Anointed One, of Christ, has come to them through us, they feel encouraged to entrust to us everything they want to bring before the Lord: “Pray for me, Father, because I have this problem”, “Bless me”, “Pray for me” – these words are the sign that the anointing has flowed down to the edges of the robe, for it has turned into prayer. The prayers of the people of God. When we have this relationship with God and with his people, and grace passes through us, then we are priests, mediators between God and men. What I want to emphasize is that we need constantly to stir up God’s grace and perceive in every request, even those requests that are inconvenient and at times purely material or downright banal – but only apparently so – the desire of our people to be anointed with fragrant oil, since they know that we have it. To perceive and to sense, even as the Lord sensed the hope-filled anguish of the woman suffering from hemorrhages when she touched the hem of his garment. At that moment, Jesus, surrounded by people on every side, embodies all the beauty of Aaron vested in priestly raiment, with the oil running down upon his robes. It is a hidden beauty, one which shines forth only for those faith-filled eyes of the woman troubled with an issue of blood. But not even the disciples – future priests – see or understand: on the “existential outskirts”, they see only what is on the surface: the crowd pressing in on Jesus from all sides (cf. Lk 8:42). The Lord, on the other hand, feels the power of the divine anointing which runs down to the edge of his cloak.

We need to “go out”, then, in order to experience our own anointing, its power and its redemptive efficacy: to the “outskirts” where there is suffering, bloodshed, blindness that longs for sight, and prisoners in thrall to many evil masters. It is not in soul-searching or constant introspection that we encounter the Lord: self-help courses can be useful in life, but to live by going from one course to another, from one method to another, leads us to become pelagians and to minimize the power of grace, which comes alive and flourishes to the extent that we, in faith, go out and give ourselves and the Gospel to others, giving what little ointment we have to those who have nothing, nothing at all.

A priest who seldom goes out of himself, who anoints little – I won’t say “not at all” because, thank God, our people take our oil from us anyway – misses out on the best of our people, on what can stir the depths of his priestly heart. Those who do not go out of themselves, instead of being mediators, gradually become intermediaries, managers. We know the difference: the intermediary, the manager, “has already received his reward”, and since he doesn’t put his own skin and his own heart on the line, he never hears a warm, heartfelt word of thanks. This is precisely the reason why some priests grow dissatisfied, become sad priests, lose heart and become in some sense collectors of antiques or novelties – instead of being shepherds living with “the smell of the sheep”, shepherds in the midst of their flock, fishers of men. True enough, the so-called crisis of priestly identity threatens us all and adds to the broader cultural crisis; but if we can resist its onslaught, we will be able to put out in the name of the Lord and cast our nets. It is not a bad thing that reality itself forces us to “put out into the deep”, where what we are by grace is clearly seen as pure grace, out into the deep of the contemporary world, where the only thing that counts is “unction” – not function – and the nets which overflow with fish are those cast solely in the name of the One in whom we have put our trust: Jesus.

Dear lay faithful, be close to your priests with affection and with your prayers, that they may always be shepherds according to God’s heart.

Dear priests, may God the Father renew in us the Spirit of holiness with whom we have been anointed. May he renew his Spirit in our hearts, that this anointing may spread to everyone, even to those “outskirts” where our faithful people most look for it and most appreciate it. May our people sense that we are the Lord’s disciples; may they feel that their names are written upon our priestly vestments and that we seek no other identity; and may they receive through our words and deeds the oil of gladness which Jesus, the Anointed One, came to bring us. Amen.
PROMULGATION OF DECREES BY CONGREGATION FOR CAUSES OF SAINTS
Vatican City, 28 March 2013 (VIS) – Yesterday, Wednesday 27 March 2013, the Holy Father received in audience Cardinal Angelo Amato S.D.B., prefect of the Congregation for the Causes of Saints. During the course of the audience the pontiff authorised the dicastery to promulgate the decrees concerning the following causes::
MIRACLE
- attributed to the intercession of the Venerable Servant of God Maria Theresia Bonzel (nee Regina Christine Wilhelmine Bonzel), foundress of the Sisters of St. Francis of Perpetual Adoration in Olpe, Germany. Born in Olpe on 17 September 1830 and died there on 6 February 1905.
MARTYRDOM
- Servant of God Manuel Basulto y Jimenez, bishop of Jaen, Spain, and five Companions; killed in hatred of the faith in Spain between 1936 and 1937.
- Servant of God Jose Maximo Moro Briz and four Companions, priests of the Diocese of Avila, Spain; killed in hatred of the faith in Spain in 1936.
- Servant of God Vladimir Ghika, priest of the archdiocese of Bucharest, Romania. Born in Istanbul, Turkey on 25 December 1873 and killed in hatred of the faith in Bucharest on 16 May 1954.
- Servant of God Joaquin Jovani Marin and 14 Companions from the Diocesan Labourer Priests of the Sacred Heart of Jesus; killed in hatred of the faith in Spain between 1936 and 1938.
- Servant of God Andres from Palazuelo (ne Miguel Francisco Gonzalez-Diez Gonzalez-Nunez), professed priest of the Order of Capuchin Friars Minor, and 31 Companions; killed in hatred of the faith in Spain between 1936 and 1937.
- Servant of God Giuseppe Girotti, professed priest of the Order of Preachers. Born in Alba, Italy, on 19 July 1905 and killed in hatred of the faith in Dachau, Germany, in 1945.
- Servant of God Stefano Sandor, professed religious of the Salesians of Don Bosco. Born in Szolnok, Hungary, on 26 October 1914 and killed in hatred of the faith in Budapest, Hungary, on 8 June 1953.
- Servant of God Rolando Rivi, seminarian of the diocese of Reggio Emilia-Guastalla. Born in Castellarano, Italy, on 7 January 1931 and killed in hatred of the faith in Piane di Monchio, Italy, on 13 April 1945.
HEROIC VIRTUES
- Servant of God Eladio Mozas Santamera, diocesan priest and founder of the Josephine Sisters of the Most Holy Trinity. Born in Miedes de Atienza, Spain, on 18 February 1837 and died in Plasencia, Spain, on 18 March 1897.
- Servant of God Manuel Aparici Navarro, diocesan priest. Born in Madrid, Spain, on 11 December 1902 and died there on 28 August 1964.
- Servant of God Moises Lira Serafin, professed priest of the Missionaries of the Holy Spirit and founder of the Missionaries of Charity of Mary Immaculate. Born in Zacatlan, Mexico, on 16 September 1893 and died in Mexico City, Mexico on 25 June 1950.
- Servant of God Generoso of the Crucified (ne Angelo Fontanarosa), professed priest of the Congregation of the Passion of Jesus Christ. Born in Vetralla, Italy, on 6 November 1881 and died in Mascalucia, Italy, on 9 January 1966.
- Servant of God Olinto Marella, diocesan priest. Born in Pallestrina, Italy, on 14 June 1882 and died in San Lazzaro di Savena, Italy, on 6 September 1969.
- Servant of God Antoine Kowalczyk, lay brother of the Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate. Born in Dzierzanow, Poland, on 04 June 1866 and died in Edmonton, Canada on 10 July 1947.
- Servant of God Silvia Cardoso Ferreiro da Silva, laywoman. Born in Pacos de Ferreira, Portugal, on 26 July 1882 and died there on 2 November 1950.
OTHER PONTIFICAL ACTS
Vatican City, 28 March 2013 (VIS) – Today the Holy Father appointed Bishop Mario Aurelio Poli as metropolitan archbishop of Buenos Aires (area 203, population 2,891,082, Catholics 2,647,000, priests 834, permanent deacons 7, religious 2,379), Argentina. The archbishop-elect was born in Buenos Aires in 1947, was ordained a priest in 1978, and received episcopal ordination in 2002. Since ordination he has served in several pastoral and academic roles, most recently as bishop of Santa Rosa, Argentina. On the Argentine Episcopal Conference he was a member of the Episcopal Commissions for Catholic Education and for Ministers and is currently president of the Episcopal Commission for Catechesis and Biblical Ministry.

TODAY'S MASS ONLINE : LORD'S SUPPER - HOLY THURS. MARCH 28, 2013

John 13: 1 - 15

1Now before the feast of the Passover, when Jesus knew that his hour had come to depart out of this world to the Father, having loved his own who were in the world, he loved them to the end.2And during supper, when the devil had already put it into the heart of Judas Iscariot, Simon's son, to betray him,3Jesus, knowing that the Father had given all things into his hands, and that he had come from God and was going to God,4rose from supper, laid aside his garments, and girded himself with a towel.5Then he poured water into a basin, and began to wash the disciples' feet, and to wipe them with the towel with which he was girded.6He came to Simon Peter; and Peter said to him, "Lord, do you wash my feet?"7Jesus answered him, "What I am doing you do not know now, but afterward you will understand."8Peter said to him, "You shall never wash my feet." Jesus answered him, "If I do not wash you, you have no part in me."9Simon Peter said to him, "Lord, not my feet only but also my hands and my head!"10Jesus said to him, "He who has bathed does not need to wash, except for his feet, but he is clean all over; and you are clean, but not every one of you."11For he knew who was to betray him; that was why he said, "You are not all clean."12When he had washed their feet, and taken his garments, and resumed his place, he said to them, "Do you know what I have done to you?13You call me Teacher and Lord; and you are right, for so I am.14If I then, your Lord and Teacher, have washed your feet, you also ought to wash one another's feet.15For I have given you an example, that you also should do as I have done to you.

AMERICA : USA : FREE RESOURCES FOR EASTER FROM BISHOPS

USCCB RELEASE

Prayer is one of the three pillars of Lenten practice.  Through prayer, we raise our hearts and minds to God in thanksgiving and praise.  Prayer is our “vital and personal relationship with the true and living God.”   During Lent, we place special emphasis on prayer and contemplation on the Passion and Death of our Lord through expressions of popular piety such as the Via Crucis (Stations of the Cross) and veneration of the Crucified Christ.  Find a variety of resources here for Lenten prayer and contemplation.

Lenten Audio Retreats

Take a 30-minute retreat each Sunday during Lent with one of our United States bishops as they reflect on the readings for the Lenten Sundays. 

The Seven Penitential Psalms and the Songs of the Suffering Servant

The Seven Penitential Psalms and  the Songs of the Suffering Servant  from the Book of the Prophet Isaiah are traditionally used for meditation and prayer during Lent.  At the page link above, you will find links to the text of the psalms and songs from theNew American Bible, Revised Edition, along with audio versions and written reflections to encourage the practice of Lectio Divina or “divine reading,” a way of praying with Scripture that calls one to listen to, study, contemplate and thoughtfully assimilate God's Word.

Stations of the Cross

The Stations of the Cross are traditionally prayed on the Fridays of Lent.  Follow the link above for more information on this popular devotional practice, including prayers for the Stations of the Cross prayed by Blessed John Paul II on Good Friday 1991 and an audio version for download.
A Week of Prayers for Lenten Devotions from the Department of Justice, Peace & Human Development

Additional Prayer Resources

SHARED FROM USCCB

CYPRUS IN FINANCIAL CRISIS - BANKS CLOSED FOR 2 WEEKS


Agenzia Fides REPORT– To maintain an atmosphere of peace in the financial crisis: is what the Christian leaders of the island of Cyprus, part of the World Council of Churches ask, who expressed "support for dialogue and peace in the island", crossed by the severe financial crisis affecting the population. Recalling that the churches are "always committed to promoting dialogue and religious freedom" – explains a note sent to Fides Agency - leaders underline that, especially at a difficult time for the people, one must still remain loyal to values such as "inter-religious dialogue , respect for human rights, peace and reconciliation," which bore fruit in the historic building of peace on the island. The Christian leaders, led by Archbishop Chrysostomos II of Cyprus, reaffirm their commitment to meet the mufti of Cyprus, Islamic leader, to share speeches on topics such as peace, human rights and religious freedom. In this way, religions can offer their particular "contribution of values" for the solution of the present economic crisis: "It is our firm belief that religious leaders have a responsibility and a unique role to play in the peace process" and in helping the nation to address the economic, social and political challenges. Christian leaders ask for the support of other religious leaders at an international level, in this delicate stage in the history of the island. (PA) (Agenzia Fides 22/03/2013)

AUSTRALIA : CATHEDRAL STARTS TRIDUUM


Catholic Communications, Sydney Archdiocese,
28 Mar 2013
The cucifixion of Our Lord
Holy Thursday, 28 March marks the start of Holy Week, the Easter Triduum.
From the Latin word meaning "three days", the Easter Triduum is the holiest time of the year in the Catholic Church.
The solemn liturgies of the Triduum are the most important liturgies of the Church year teaching the meaning of Christ's life, death and resurrection.
Archbishop of Sydney Cardinal George Pell will celebrate the Chrism Mass at 10.30 this morning at St Mary's Cathedral.
Priests from every parish across the Archdiocese will gather to commemorate the three pillars of the Catholic faith: the Sacrament of Holy Communion, the Priesthood and the Mass.
The Archdiocese of Sydney's three Auxiliary Bishops, the Most Rev Julian Porteous, Most Rev Peter Comensoli and the Most Rev Terry Brady will be concelebrants at the Chrism Mass. Seminarians from the Seminary of the Good Shepherd at Homebush and the Redemptoris Mater Missionary Seminary of the Neocatechumenal Way at Chester Hill will be servers at the Mass.
During the Chrism Mass, the Holy Oils to be used throughout the coming year for Sacraments of Baptism, Confirmation, Holy Orders and the Anointing of the Sick are consecrated.
Then at 6.30 tonight Cardinal Pell will celebrate the Mass of the Lord's Supper at the Cathedral. Traditionally held after sundown, this Mass commemorates the Institution of the Sacrament of Holy Communion and recalls the Last Supper of Our Lord.
It was at this last supper that Christ after he was betrayed, offered His Body and Blood to God the Father, under the species of bread and wine which he gave to the Apostles as spiritual nourishment, commanding them and their successors in the priesthood to perpetuate this offering.
At the Mass of the Lord's Supper it is traditional in Catholic dioceses for the archbishop or bishop to wash the feet of 12 priests to symbolise Christ's washing of the feet of His Apostles and a symbol of service everyone is called to live.
As the Mass ends in silence, the Blessed Sacrament is carried in procession to St Mary's Cathedral's Altar of Repose where it will remain until Mass the following day.
Holy Thursday concludes with Compline, the Office of Night Prayer at 9 pm which like the Lord's Supper Mass and Chrism Mass will be sung by the Cathedral Choir conducted by the Cathedral's Director of Music, Thomas Wilson.
Good Friday which falls on 29 March this year commemorates the crucifixion of Jesus and is the most solemn day in the Christian calendar. It is a day of quiet fasting and mourning, remembering again how Jesus suffered and died for our sins.
Stations of the Cross and Adoration of the Cross will begin at the Cathedral at 10am. Cathedral Scholars under the direction of Oliver Brett will perform the powerful and moving, Crux Fidelis by King John IV of Portugal.
At 3.00 pm on Good Friday Cardinal Pell will preside over the Solemn Commemoration of the Lord's Passion.
Christ has died. Christ is Risen. Christ will come again.
The ceremony and prayers are solemn and reflective. The pulpit and altar will be bare; no candles lit. This creates the awareness of grief over the sacrifice of God's only begotten Son.
Communion will be distributed - the hosts having been blessed in the Thursday Mass.
 The full Cathedral Choir conducted by Thomas Wilson will sing Christus factus est by Bruckner, the Passion according to St John by Victoria, Improperia by Victoria, O vos omnes by Caslas, Miserere me, Deus by Allgri, Lemndtations of Jeremiah by Tallis and Crux Fidelis.
Members of Embrace, the Cathedral's young adult group will join seminarians from the city's two seminaries to distribute small crosses to the faithful.
On Holy Saturday, 30 March, Tenebrae: the Office of Readings will be held at the Cathedral at 10 am.
Saturday night at 7.00pm there will be the high point of the Easter Triduum celebrating the Passion and Resurrection of Jesus. This will be celebrated by Cardinal Pell and is an extremely moving service which begins in a darkened Cathedral. There is the blessing of new fire, lighting of the paschal candle and the Easter Proclamation.
The full Cathedral choir will participate. Among the sacred music performed by the Choir during the Vigil will be Sicut cervus by Palesterina, Mass in D by Dvorak, Hallilujah by Handel and O filii et filiae by Baker.
Every year this Easter Vigil attracts thousands of people who recognise the holiest and most important days of remembrance and celebration in the Catholic Church.
The Easter Triduum is the holiest time of the year in the Catholic Church.
The Easter fast, begun on Good Friday ends on Sunday, 1 April when the world celebrates the Resurrection of Our Lord. Statues and artworks covered for Lent are uncovered, the altar is no longer bare and the entire Cathedral is filled with flowers as St Mary's famous bells ring out across the city.
His Eminence, Cardinal Pell will celebrate the Solemn Mass on Easter Sunday at 10.30 am.  The Mass with Apostolic Blessing and plenary indulgence will be accompanied by the voices of the Cathedral Choir who will perform Missa brevis in D by Mozart, O death, where is thy sting by Handel and Worthy is the Lamb by Handel.
The Cathedral Men's Choir conducted by Thomas Wilson will sing at the Solemn Vespers and Benediction at the Cathedral on Easter Sunday at 5 pm.
In addition to Holy Week and Easter Sunday at the Cathedral, there will be a special Easter Sunday Mass for the homeless and in need at the Matthew Talbot Hostel in Woolloomooloo. Auxiliary Bishop Terry Brady will celebrate the Mass at Society of St Vincent de Paul's well-known hostel for  homeless men at 9.30 am prior to a special Easter mid-day meal prepared by the hostel staff and served by Vinnies team of volunteers.
Cardinal Pell returned from the papal conclave and election of Pope Francis in Rome last week in time for the Palm Sunday celebrations commemorating Christ's arrival in ancient Jerusalem riding on a small donkey to be greeted by exuberant crowds hailing him as the Messiah and waving palm fronds.
As we know before the week was out, Christ had been betrayed and arrested. What followed was the Lord's terrible suffering and his crucifixion outside the walls of the city.
But three days later came His glorious resurrection which Catholics and Christians of all denominations celebrate on Easter Sunday.
Everyone is welcome to take part in the Easter Triduum at St Mary's Cathedral.
Cardinal Pell's Easter Message for this year can be seen on the homepage of this website from Good Friday.
SHARED FROM ARCHDIOCESE OF SYDNEY

ASIA : IRAQ : PATRIARCH PROMOTES PEACE PLAN

ASIA NEWS REPORT
by Joseph Mahmoud
Developed in four points, the document was presented to Prime Minister al-Maliki and President of the Parliament. It provides for an end to "foreign intervention" in matters of domestic policy and the reconstruction of the "Iraqi home" with the participation "of all active components in society." Appeal for proper use of media and avoid exploitation in upcoming elections.


Baghdad (AsiaNews) - An end to "foreign intervention" in matters of domestic policy and the promotion of the reconstruction of the "Iraqi home" through the "active participation of all members of the political world." This is the appeal that his Beatitude Mar Louis Sako I addressed this morning the President of Parliament Osama al-Nujayfi Abdu'l Aziz, in an official meeting which was attended - as well as by the Chaldean Patriarch - by all the main leaders of the Christian Churches . The face to face talks are part of a series of initiatives promoted by leaders of the religious minority, to revive the peace process and autonomy of the Arab nation, 10 years after the U.S. invasion, in the run-up to Easter.
As reported by the site baghdadhope, yesterday morning, the Chaldean Patriarch and heads of Christian denominations in Baghdad (pictured) met the leaders of the government, led by Shiite Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki and Environment Minister, and Christian, Sargon Lazar. The talks centered on a "national reconciliation" plan developed - in recent days - by the Christian leaders, during a series of meetings dedicated to pastoral action.

Addressing the Prime Minister al-Maliki, his Beatitude Mar Louis I recalled the Gospel, where Jesus says that "the greatest among you shall be my servant." "You- said the Patriarch - are the greatest among us in terms of responsibility, and it is your duty to take the initiative for reconciliation, as would a father, for the sake of Iraq and the Iraqi people."

The Christian peace plan has been proposed to the President of the Republic, leaders of the autonomous region of Kurdistan and this morning, the President of Parliament. In addition to an end to foreign "interference" the plan provides for three other main points: resolution of differences through dialogue and avoid "use the media to provoke and threaten", especially in view of the elections; reopen the dossier concerning the prisoners "in the territory of competence, releasing the innocent" establish a commission for dialogue that gives practical application to the peace plan.

SHARED FROM ASIA NEWS IT

TODAY'S SAINT : MARCH 28 : POPE ST. SIXTUS III


Pope St. Sixtus III
POPE
Feast: March 28


     Information:
Feast Day:March 28
Died:18 August 440 in Rome, Italy
Consecrated 31 July, 432; d. 440. Previous to his accession he was prominent among the Roman clergy and in correspondence with St. Augustine. He reigned during the Nestorian and Pelagian controversies, and it was probably owing to his conciliatory disposition that he was falsely accused of leanings towards these heresies. As pope he approved the Acts of the Council of Ephesus and endeavoured to restore peace between Cyril of Alexandria and John of Antioch. In the Pelagian controversy he frustrated the attempt of Julian of Eclanum to be readmitted to communion with the Catholic Church. He defended the pope's right of supremacy over Illyricum against the local bishops and the ambitious designs of Proclus of Constantinople. At Rome he restored the Basilica of Liberius, now known as St. Mary Major, enlarged the Basilica of St. Lawrence-Without-the-Walls, and obtained precious gifts from the Emperor Valentinian III for St. Peter's and the Lateran Basilica. The work which asserts that the consul Bassus accused him of crime is a forgery. He is the author of eight letters (in P.L., L, 583 sqq.), but he did not write the works "On Riches", "On False Teachers", and "On Chastity" ("De divitiis", "De malis doctoribus", "De castitate") attributed to him. His feast is kept on 28 March.
(Taken From Catholic Encyclopedia)


Read more: http://www.ewtn.com/saintsHoly/saints/S/stsixtusiii.asp#ixzz1qPbB18FV
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