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Wednesday, October 5, 2011

CATHOLIC NEWS WORLD: TUES. OCT. 4, 2011









VATICAN: POPE: WORKSHOP ON ART AND OTHER NEWS

AMERICA: USA: BISHOPS WEBSITE HOW TO PRAY ROSARY

ASIA: INDIA: SPECIAL BLESSING FOR ANIMALS ON FEAST OF ST. FRANCIS

EUROPE: ANNUAL RED MASS FOR THOSE IN JUSTICE SYSTEM

AFRICA: TUNISIA: PREPARATIONS FOR DEMOCRATIC ELECTIONS

AUSTRALIA: CAPUCHINS TO RUN MELBOURNE PARISH

TODAY'S SAINT: OCT. 4: ST. FRANCIS OF ASSISI: DIED 1226

TODAY'S GOSPEL: OCT. 4: Matthew 11: 25- 30


VATICAN: POPE: WORKSHOP ON ART AND OTHER NEWS

VATICAN MUSEUMS HOST WORKSHOP ON CONSERVATION OF ART

VATICAN CITY, 4 OCT 2011 (VIS) - The Vatican Museums are today hosting a workshop entitled "Sharing Conservation: several approaches to the conservation of art made with different materials". The event, which will being together art restoration and conservation experts from all over the world, is being presided by Antonio Paolucci, director of the Vatican Museums.

The workshop will be divided into three sessions. The first of these, entitled "a glimpse of the East", will consider such subjects as the "restoration and conservation of thirteen Japanese kakemono from the Missionary Ethnological Museum - Vatican Museums", "tangible and intangible cultural heritage", "the rescue, conservation and restoration project of the statue of Avalokitesvara Bodhisattva in Dazu rock carvings", and the "conservation and restoration of wall paintings in Burma (Pagan) and Tibet (Dege County)".

The second session, dedicated to formation and training, will include discussion of the topics: "restoring collections of prehistoric artefacts", "conservation of polymaterial objects: conservation and restoration experiences in Mexico", and "restoration works and professional formation inYemen".

The third and final session of the day will focus on communication and research. among other subjects, attention will be given to "the complex world of avian plumage: developing a technical and condition database for California Native American featherwork", "conservation of contemporary art and technical or ethnographic heritage: a new pedagogical challenge", and "the collections of polymaterial works: case studies of theory (ethics) of conservation in the experience of the ISCR".

.../ VIS 20111004 (250)

THE ROLE OF EDUCATION IN ENRICHING A NATION

VATICAN CITY, 4 OCT 2011 (VIS) - On Sunday 2 October, Cardinal Secretary of State Tarcisio Bertone S.D.B. represented the Holy Father at the beatification of Antonia Maria Verna (1773-1838). The beatification ceremony was held in the cathedral of Ivrea, Italy.

In his homily Cardinal Bertone highlighted the present-day validity of the new blessed's educational ideas, which remind us of the vital need for schools in which the religious dimension "can be revealed in all its positive potential for full human development. This aspect is also very important for our time", he said. "Too often it seems that people are afraid to leave space for the religious dimension of life, which is inherent to the human heart, and would like to hide it in the private world of the individual. Such an attitude greatly impoverishes educational activity".

Mother Verna's message "invites us not to be afraid to educate people in the demanding choices which Jesus continues to present in the Church". She was a pioneer of female education, who worked towards "the authentic promotion of women in the society of the day".

"In collaboration with the civil authorities of her time, Mother Antonia strove for a form of education ... that could reach the largest number of children and help them to develop all dimensions of their personality, completely and harmoniously".

Cardinal Bertone laid emphasis on the many primary and secondary schools founded by the new blessed and her congregation, the Institute of the Sisters of Charity of the Immaculate Conception. This, he said, "calls upon us to consider, today more than every, the role of institutions which enjoy parity with State schools as a factor enriching a nation's education". The schools run by the Sisters of Charity in Europe, America, the Middle East and Africa have produced "generations of teachers who have been, and continue to be, true educators whose contribution to the cultural and social development of their countries is difficult to evaluate and too often forgotten".

As a sign of gratitude, a delegation from the diocese of Ivrea, led by Bishop Arrigo Miglio, will participate in the Holy Father's general audience tomorrow.

SS/ VIS 20111004 (370)

OTHER PONTIFICAL ACTS

VATICAN CITY, 4 OCT 2011 (VIS) - The Holy Father:

- Accepted the resignation from the office of auxiliary of the diocese of Augsburg,Germany, presented by Bishop Josef Grunwald, upon having reached the age limit.

- Appointed Msgr. Vito Angelo Todisco of the clergy of the diocese of Avellino, Italy, defender of the bond at the Tribunal of the Roman Rota, and Msgr. Felipe Heredia Esteban of the clergy of the diocese of Calahorra y La Calzada-Logrono, Spain, judge of the Tribunal of the Rota of the apostolic nunciature to Madrid, as prelate auditors of the Tribunal of the Roman Rota.

- Appointed Fr. Kevin Gillespie, official of the Congregation for the Clergy, and Fr. Massimiliano Matteo Boiardi F.S.C.B. official of the Section for Relations with States of the Secretariat of State, as masters of pontifical ceremonies.

AMERICA: USA: BISHOPS WEBSITE HOW TO PRAY ROSARY

USCCB REPORT: The Rosary is a Scripture-based prayer. It begins with the Apostles' Creed, which summarizes the great mysteries of the Catholic faith. The Our Father, which introduces each mystery, is from the Gospels. The first part of the Hail Mary is the angel's words announcing Christ's birth and Elizabeth's greeting to Mary. St. Pius V officially added the second part of the Hail Mary.The Mysteries of the Rosary center on the events of Christ's life. There are four sets of Mysteries: Joyful, Sorrowful, Glorious and–added by Pope John II in 2002–the Luminous.

The repetition in the Rosary is meant to lead one into restful and contemplative prayer related to each Mystery. The gentle repetition of the words helps us to enter into the silence of our hearts, where Christ's spirit dwells. The Rosary can be said privately or with a group.

The Five Joyful Mysteries are traditionally prayed on the Mondays, Saturdays, and Sundays of Advent:

  1. The Annunciation
  2. The Visitation
  3. The Nativity
  4. The Presentation in the Temple
  5. The Finding in the Temple

The Five Sorrowful Mysteries are traditionally prayed on the Tuesday, Friday, and Sundays of Lent:

  1. The Agony in the Garden
  2. The Scourging at the Pillar
  3. The Crowning with Thorns
  4. The Carrying of the Cross
  5. The Crucifixion and Death
The Five Glorious Mysteries are traditionally prayed on the Wednesday and Sundays outside of Lent and Advent:
  1. The Resurrection
  2. The Ascension
  3. The Descent of the Holy Spirit
  4. The Assumption
  5. The Coronation of Mary

The Five Luminous Mysteries are traditionally prayed on Thursdays:

  1. The Baptism of Christ in the Jordan
  2. The Wedding Feast at Cana
  3. Jesus' Proclamation of the Coming of the Kingdom of God
  4. The Transfiguration
  5. The Institution of the Eucharisthow-to-pray-the-rosary

Praying the Rosary

Familiarize yourself and/or your group with the prayers of the rosary.

  1. Make the Sign of the Cross.
  2. Holding the Crucifix, say the Apostles' Creed.
  3. On the first bead, say an Our Father.
  4. Say three Hail Marys on each of the next three beads.
  5. Say the Glory Be
  6. For each of the five decades, announce the Mystery, then say theOur Father.
  7. While fingering each of the ten beads of the decade, next say ten Hail Marys while meditating on the Mystery. Then say a Glory Be. (After finishing each decade, some say the following prayer requested by the Blessed Virgin Mary at Fatima: "O my Jesus, forgive us our sins, save us from the fires of hell,lead all souls to Heaven, especially those who have most need of your mercy.")
  8. After saying the five decades, say the "Hail, Holy Queen, followed by this dialogue and prayer:
    V. Pray for us, O holy Mother of God.
    R. That we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

    Let us pray: O God, whose only-begotten Son, by his life, death, and resurrection,
    has purchased for us the rewards of eternal life,
    grant, we beseech thee, that while meditating on these mysteries of the most holy Rosary,
    of the Blessed Virgin Mary,
    we may imitate what they contain
    and obtain what they promise,
    through the same Christ our Lord. Amen
    http://www.usccb.org/prayer-and-worship/devotionals/rosaries/how-to-pray-the-rosary.cfm

ASIA: INDIA: SPECIAL BLESSING FOR ANIMALS ON FEAST OF ST. FRANCIS

ASIA NEWS REPORT: by Nirmala Carvalho
Fr Joseph D’Souza offers a blessing for dogs, Persian cats, parrots, a turtle and a rabbit, “true gifts of God”. Remembering Saint Francis, who “worked to widen further the fraternity that links humans and creatures”, he says that all creatures “are blessed in the eyes of the Lord”. Today, the liturgical memory of the Saint of Assisi is held today.

Mumbai (AsiaNews) – Thirty dogs of different breeds, four Persian cats, fish from six aquariums, six cages with love birds, eight cages of parrots, one turtle and one rabbit were given the annual special blessing for pets. “With these prayers, we call upon God, the creator of the universe, to protect all his creatures, man’s faithful friends,” said Fr Joseph D’Souza, who conducted the service. In addition to the animals, their respective owners, Hindu, Parsees and Christians, were also blessed on Sunday in the Church of Saint Ignatius in Mumbai.

The blessing was also an opportunity to remember Saint Francis of Assisi, whose liturgical memory falls today. “Saint Francis was the first to come up with the idea that not only human beings were among the myriad of God’s creatures, and that all are blessed in the eyes of the Lord,” Fr D’Souza told those present.

The Saint from Assisi “worked to widen further the fraternity that links humans and creatures in the same relationship with God,” the clergyman explained.

Fr Joseph D’Souza came up with the idea of blessing the animals 12 years ago when he was parish priest at Our Lady of Dolours in Sonapur, Marine Lines.

A self-confessed animal lover, he is the owner of a Pomeranian spitz called ‘Wolfie’. “At a time in history when people spend more time with gadgets and objects of all sorts, such an occasion reminds us to show love, care and gratitude to our animals, true gifts of God,” he said.

EUROPE: ANNUAL RED MASS FOR THOSE IN JUSTICE SYSTEM

Red Mass at Westminster Cathedral | Baroness Scotland, Lady Justice Rafferty,  Mr Justice Tugendhat, Mr Justice Butterfield,Vincent Nichols,Red Mass IND. CATH NEWS REPORT: The annual Red Mass, marking the first day of the legal year, took place at Westminster Cathedral on Monday. 3 October. The congregation included Baroness Scotland, Lady Justice Rafferty, Court of Appeal judge, judges on the High Court bench, Mr Justice Tugendhat and Mr Justice Butterfield as well as many Catholic barristers, solicitors, policemen, probation officers and others connected with the courts. The Mass was celebrated by The Most Rev Vincent Nichols, Archbishop of Westminster.

In his Homily, Archbishop Nichols said: "Today we pray that our personal weaknesses - our preferences and prejudices, our personal experiences and pain - may not corrupt our judgement, whether in the court or in the Church. Ours is a judgement to be given in love - a love above all for the truth, and because it is for the truth, a love for the person who is subject to that judgement. Justice must surely be a service of love, not simply an exercise of power nor, certainly, of retribution."

Archbishop Nichols also said that every aspect of the legal process - enquiry, trial, judgment and review - needed the 'blest light' of the Holy Spirit: "We know only too well the complexity, even the deviousness, of the human heart. And you know well how difficult it often is to discern motive, effect, consequence as well as the responsibility and subsequent guilt. Even though procedures and precedent are well established, there remains in every case a moment of human judgement. 'Blest light' given at that moment is welcome indeed."

The Red Mass has always been an important celebration in the legal year. Before the Reformation the Judiciary and legal profession gathered at Westminster Abbey on the first day of the Michaelmas term, and law year, to call upon the Holy Spirit to guide it in its work in the year ahead.

This practice stopped during the Reformation but was revived in 1891, and from then until 1904 was celebrated in the Sardinian Chapel, now the Parish church of St Anselm and St Cecilia, Kingsway. In 1904 the Mass was transferred to Westminster Cathedral at the request of Archbishop Bourne (as he was then). Every year since then the tradition has continued at the Cathedral.

The arrangements for the Mass are made each year by the Thomas More Society, whose membership comprises mainly of Catholic members of the Judiciary and Bar as well as solicitors.

Full text of the Homily follows:

We began our Mass this morning with the lovely hymn to the Holy Spirit: Veni Creator Spiritus. It was a fitting prayer with which to start this Red Mass, a votive Mass of the Holy Spirit. The hymn, as you will know, is sung at many celebrations of Confirmation and at every ordination to Holy Orders. It is, we can say, our best prayer for the gift of the Holy Spirit. This morning we ask that gift for all involved in the administration of justice in our land.

All the words of this hymn are worthy of our reflection and contemplation. But I would like to focus on the fourth verse, on these words:

'O guide our minds with thy blest light
With love our hearts inflame
And with thy strength, which ne'er decays
Confirm our mortal frame.'

This, perhaps, is the essence of our prayer this morning. Minds involved in every aspect of enquiry, trial, judgment and review truly need 'thy blest light'. We know only too well the complexity, even the deviousness, of the human heart. And you know well how difficult it often is to discern motive, effect, consequence as well as the responsibility and subsequent guilt. Even though procedures and precedent are well established, there remains in every case a moment of human judgement. 'Blest light' given at that moment is welcome indeed.

The verse also acknowledges another important fact. It speaks of our 'mortal frame', 'infirma nostra corporis' and we - all of us - do well to remember our own limitations and weaknesses, no matter the stature of the office we may hold. Today we pray that our personal weaknesses - our preferences and prejudices, our personal experiences and pain - may not corrupt our judgement, whether in the court or in the Church. Ours is a judgement to be given in love - a love above all for the truth, and because it is for the truth, a love for the person who is subject to that judgement. Justice must surely be a service of love, not simply an exercise of power nor, certainly, of retribution.

The words of this morning's Gospel also speak of this gift for which we pray, the gift of the Holy Spirit. Now we learn a name by which the gift is known, a gift familiar to your profession: the Holy Spirit is an 'Advocate'. And we learn that the Advocate is the gift of the Father sent to us in the name of Christ.

So today, at this Mass we come to the true source of that gift: we come to Christ himself and the sacraments he has given to the Church, his body. Here is the source of the presence of the Holy Spirit in our lives. From Jesus himself comes this gift. We receive it from him, in the life of the Church. This is the joyful promise we are given.

Of course the flow of the Holy Spirit is not limited by the sacramental life of the Church. The Holy Spirit flows where He wills and we all know of the fruits of that Spirit found in so many people and places. But we are sure that the full and transforming gift comes to us through Christ's body, through the wound in his side, through the Church. Our Catholic faith, then, is indeed a precious gift, one to be treasured and nurtured not least for your lives and work.

A second point arises from this focus on the person of Jesus. He is the revelation of the justice of God. In him we see how God responds to us sinners, to us who offend against His love, His design for our happiness. In Jesus we see God's stance towards us as we stand in the dock, sure, in our hearts, of our guilt.

This revelation of God's justice is most fully expressed in the figure of our crucified Saviour. In his broken body we see the effects of our offences, for we know well that a crime and a sin always has its victim. In his unwavering love we see the mercy of God who permits all our failures, the damage we do and our anger at it, to be absorbed by Jesus - into the infinite capacity of his divinity - so that the justice of God may issue forth in forgiveness and freedom.

Our human justice can never match that! We struggle in the foothills of such grandeur of justice, mercy and love. Yet we must do our best in an oh-so imperfect world. We know that our system of justice are somewhat blunt - even brutal at times. But we also know it is the best we have. So we commend it, humbly, to the Lord who alone knows all hearts and who is abounding in love and mercy.

'O guide our minds with thy blest light
With love our hearts inflame
And with thy strength which ne'er decays
Confirm our mortal frame.'

Amen.

Source: Archbishops' House

AUSTRALIA: CAPUCHINS TO RUN MELBOURNE PARISH

CATH NEWS REPORT: The Catholic Archdiocese of Melbourne has reportedly signed up the Capuchins to run the South Melbourne parish of Sts Peter and Paul, reports The Age.


Mr Long said the archdiocese signed up the Capuchins without a word to the parish, an approach he said was contemptible, tawdry and distressing.

After a public outcry over the call for parish priest Father Bob Maguire to retire two years ago, a compromise was reached whereby he would retire next February, but South Melbourne Parish Council chairman Tony Long said yesterday the parishioners wanted him to stay on.

When he and another parish councillor met two Capuchin representatives last week, it emerged only by accident that the Capuchins had been offered the parish and accepted, Mr Long said.

''We were shocked. We were working towards asking for an extension (for Fr Maguire). Given the shortage of parish priests, why wouldn't they use someone who is active and able?''

He said some might see the lack of courtesy as minor, that the archdiocese had the authority and did not need the involvement of the parish. ''But it was a contemptible thing to do.''

The archdiocese and Australian head of the Capuchin order, Father Gary Devery, have declined to comment.

http://www.cathnews.com/article.aspx?aeid=28507

AFRICA: TUNISIA: PREPARATIONS FOR DEMOCRATIC ELECTIONS

Agenzia Fides REPORT - "We are close to the Tunisian people in this transitional phase of their history, with love and respect", says Fr. Jawad Alamat, National Director of the Pontifical Missionary Societies (PMS) of Tunisia in an interview with Fides. Tunisia is preparing the first truly free and democratic elections in its history, to be held on October 23. In view of this deadline, we asked a few questions on the situation of the Church and the country to Fr. Jawad, who is of Jordanian origin.

How is the Church made up in Tunisia?
We are a small community made up of people of 70 nationalities. Among the faithful there are businessmen, diplomats, students (most of them from sub-Saharan Africa), refugees and tourists, even if the latter have become less frequent lately because of political instability. Let’s not despair, however, we hope tourism will soon be as it used to be. Besides these, there are about 12,000 Catholic women married to Muslim Tunisians. Finally, we have a dozen Catholic schools, where most of the approximately 8,000 students are Muslims: their parents are placing their trust in us and we appreciate the quality of education offered.

How did you live the phase of the Tunisian revolution? Did you feel unsafe?
No, because our Muslim friends protected us and told us to be calm. It is true that Fr. Marek Rybinsk’s murderer (Polish Salesian missionary killed on Feb.18 in Manouba, see Fides 19 and 22 February 2011) was a sad episode, but it was a common crime that was intended to attack the Church as such. In fact, 3,000 Tunisians paraded in front of the Cathedral of Tunis carrying signs that expressed their solidarity with the Church. It was a beautiful gesture.

What do you think of the problem of Tunisian emigration in Europe and of the social alarm that this phenomenon creates in some areas?
I was on the Italian island of Lampedusa, the first landing point in Europe for a large part of Tunisian migrants. I understand the islanders reaction of frustration, because when a population of 3,000 people suddenly reaches 5,000 it is physiological to have problems. That said, it is necessary to overcome emergencies and think about the Mediterranean and the movement of people between the northern and southern shores as an opportunity and not as a threat. Tunisia, with its young and dynamic population, is an unexplored resource for Europe, especially for Italy, which is, however loved by Tunisians. The immigration movement is not necessarily unidirectional, from Tunisia to Europe. European business leaders could come to Tunisia to invest and create new jobs.

To do this the political situation needs to become more stable, some fear the success of Islamist parties in the upcoming elections ...
The Tunisians are learning the rules of the democratic game day by day and are doing their best so that the next election is successful. As for the Islamists, it is a good thing for them to be involved in the democratic process, accepting the rules. Their exclusion would be dangerous as well as unjust. I would like to point out that 70% of the unemployed are young people, with diplomas and degrees with a specialization. This is a huge potential to be used for the good of the Country. The Tunisian identity is the result of a synthesis between the West and Islam. This is why Tunisia can be a bridge between Europe and the Arab world. (L.M.) (Agenzia Fides 04/10/2011)

TODAY'S SAINT: OCT. 4: ST. FRANCIS OF ASSISI: DIED 1226


Francis of Assisi, Saint (1182–1226) Italian founder of theFranciscans, b. Giovanni di Bernardone. The son of a wealthy merchant in Assisi, Francis renounced his worldly life for one of poverty and prayer in 1205. In 1209, he received permission from Pope Innocent III to begin a monastic order. The Franciscans were vowed to humility, poverty and devotion to the task of helping people. In 1212, with StClare, he established an order for women, popularly called the Poor Clares. In 1224, while Francis prayed on Monte della Verna, near Florence, the stigmata wounds of the Crucifixion appeared on his body. He was canonized in 1228. His feast day is October 4.

TODAY'S GOSPEL: OCT. 4: Matthew 11: 25- 30

Matthew 11: 25 - 30
25At that time Jesus declared, "I thank thee, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that thou hast hidden these things from the wise and understanding and revealed them to babes;
26yea, Father, for such was thy gracious will.
27All things have been delivered to me by my Father; and no one knows the Son except the Father, and no one knows the Father except the Son and any one to whom the Son chooses to reveal him.
28Come to me, all who labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.
29Take my yoke upon you, and learn from me; for I am gentle and lowly in heart, and you will find rest for your souls.
30For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light."
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