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Thursday, August 18, 2011

CATHOLIC NEWS WORLD: THURS. AUG 18, 2011











VATICAN: POPE: WYD ARRIVAL- OFFICIAL ADDRESS- PRESS CONFERENCE

EUROPE: WYD: GOODNESS REIGNS FILM FESTIVAL FOR PILGRIMS

AUSTRALIA: WYD PILGRIMS HEAR FROM CARDINAL PELL

AMERICA: CANADA: RIP- ARCHBISHOP EMERITUS BURKE- HALIFAX, NOVA SCOTIA

ASIA: PAKISTAN: SEVERE FLOOD DAMAGE- CARITAS BUILDS HOMES FOR VICTIMS

AFRICA: MALAWI: INTER-FAITH PRAYER MEETING FOR PEACE

TODAY'S SAINT: AUG. 18: ST. HELENA

TODAY'S SAINT: AUG. 18: ST. JANE FRANCES DE CHANTAL



VATICAN: POPE: WYD ARRIVAL- OFFICIAL ADDRESS- PRESS CONFERENCE
RADIO VATICANA REPORT: APOSTOLIC JOURNEYOF HIS HOLINESS POPE BENEDICT XVI TO MADRID 26thWORLD YOUTH DAY. Welcome Ceremony, Barajas Airport, Madrid Address of the Holy Father Thursday, 18 August 2011


Your Majesties,
Your Eminence the Archbishop of Madrid,
Your Eminences,
Dear Brother Bishops and Priests,
Distinguished National, Autonomous Regional and Local Authorities,
Dear Brothers and Sisters of Madrid and of all Spain,


I am grateful to Your Majesty for your presence together with the Queen, and for the kind and deferential words with which you welcomed me, reviving in me the unforgettable gestures of kindness which I received during my previous Apostolic Journeys to Spain, and most particularly during my recent Visit to Santiago de Compostela and Barcelona. I greet very cordially those of you gathered here at Barajas and those of you following this event on radio and television. A very grateful greeting also goes to those who, with such commitment and dedication, from the ecclesiastical and civil spheres, have contributed with their efforts and work so that this World Youth Day in Madrid might unfold well and bring forth abundant fruits.
With all my heart I also wish to recognize the hospitality so many families, parishes, schools and other institutions which have welcomed young people from all over the world, firstly in various regions and cities of Spain, and now in the great cosmopolitan and welcoming city of Madrid.
I have come here to meet thousands of young people from all over the world, Catholics committed to Christ searching for the truth that will give real meaning to their existence. I come as the Successor of Peter, to confirm them all in the faith, with days of intense pastoral activity, proclaiming that Jesus Christ is the way, the truth and the life; to motivate the commitment to build up the Kingdom of God in the world among us; to exhort young people to and so, rooted in his person, to become faithful followers and valiant witnesses.
Why has this multitude of young people come to Madrid? While they themselves should give the reply, it may be supposed that they wish to hear the word of God, as the motto for this World Youth Day proposed to them, in such a way that, rooted and built upon Christ, they may manifest the strength of their faith.
Many of them have heard the voice of God, perhaps only as a little whisper, which has led them to search for him more diligently and to share with others the experience of the force which he has in their lives. The discovery of the living God inspires young people and opens their eyes to the challenges of the world in which they live, with its possibilities and limitations. They see the prevailing superficiality, consumerism and hedonism, the widespread banalization of sexuality, the lack of solidarity, the corruption. They know that, without God, it would be hard to confront these challenges and to be truly happy, and thus pouring out their enthusiasm in the attainment of an authentic life. But, with God beside them, they will possess light to walk by and reasons to hope, unrestrained before their highest ideals, which will motivate their generous commitment to build a society where human dignity and true brotherhood are respected. Here on this Day, they have a special opportunity to gather together their aspirations, to share the richness of their cultures and experiences, motivate each other along a journey of faith and life, in which some think they are alone or ignored in their daily existence. But they are not alone. Many people of the same age have the same aspirations and, entrusting themselves completely to Christ, know that they really have a future before them and are not afraid of the decisive commitments which fulfill their entire lives. That is why it gives me great joy to listen to them, pray with them and celebrate the Eucharist with them. World Youth Day brings us a message of hope like a pure and youthful breeze, with rejuvenating scents which fill us with confidence before the future of the Church and the world.
Of course, there is no lack of difficulties. There are tensions and ongoing conflicts all over the world, even to the shedding of blood. Justice and the unique value of the human person are easily surrendered to selfish, material and ideological interests. Nature and the environment, created by God with so much love, are not respected. Moreover, many young people look worriedly to the future, as they search for work, or because they have lost their job or because the one they have is precarious or uncertain. There are others who need help either to avoid drugs or to recover from their use. There are even some who, because of their faith in Christ, suffer discrimination which leads to contempt and persecution, open or hidden, which they endure in various regions and countries. They are harassed to give him up, depriving them of the signs of his presence in public life, not allowing even the mention of his holy name. But, with all my heart, I say again to you young people: let nothing and no one take away your peace; do not be ashamed of the Lord. He did not spare himself in becoming one like us and in experiencing our anguish so as to lift it up to God, and in this way he saved us.
In this regard, the young followers of Jesus must be aided to remain firm in the faith and to embrace the beautiful adventure of proclaiming it and witnessing to it openly with their lives. A witness that is courageous and full of love for their brothers and sisters, resolute and at the same time prudent, without hiding its Christian identity, living together with other legitimate choices in a spirit of respect while at the same time demanding due respect for one’s own choices.
Your Majesty, as I reiterate my thanks for the kind welcome which you gave to me, I in turn wish to express my esteem for and nearness to all the peoples of Spain, as well as my admiration for a country so rich in history and in culture through the vitality of its faith, which has borne fruit in so many saints over the centuries, in numerous men and women who, leaving their native land, brought the Gospel to every corner of the globe, and in people through all this land who act with rectitude, solidarity and goodness. It is a great treasure which should be cared for constructively, for the common good of today and in order to offer a bright horizon to future generations. Although there are currently some reasons for concern, the greatest one is the desire for the betterment of all Spaniards with that dynamism which characterizes them and to which their deep and very fruitful Christian roots have contributed so much down through the centuries.
From this place I send very cordial greetings to you all, dear friends of Spain and Madrid, and those of you from other lands. During these days I will be with you, thinking of all young people in the world, in particular those who are going through various kinds of trial. Entrusting this Meeting to the most holy Virgin Mary, and to the patron saints of this Day, I ask God always to bless and protect the sons and daughters of Spain. Thank you very much.

POPE'S MESSAGE TO WYD PILGRIMS ON ARRIVAL


“With all my heart, I say again to you young people: let nothing and no one take away your peace; do not be ashamed of the Lord”. This is the message that Pope Benedict XVI has brought to Spain and to the young Catholics of the world, resonant of that other great call “do not be afraid” launched by the founder and patron of all World Youth Days, Blessed Pope John Paul II. Pope Benedict XVI’s generation has found its motto : do not be ashamed of the Lord.

The papal plane touched down at Barajas International airport in Madrid shortly before midday Thursday, marking the official start of the four day visit. After days of torrid heat, cooler temperatures and a light sprinkling of rain greeted the Pope as he emerged from the plane, to the joy of the young people waiting patiently behind security barriers and a marked police presence. Security has been stepped up across the capital following clashes between the police and protesters against the papal visit on Wednesday evening.

“World Youth Day brings us a message of hope like a pure and youthful breeze, with rejuvenating scents”, he told them “which fill us with confidence before the future of the Church and the world”.

As protocol demands, Pope Benedict was greeted first by the Apostolic Nuncio to Spain, Archbishop Renzo Fratini. At the foot of the plane, King Juan Carlos and Queen Sofia of Spain waited to welcome him while the military bands struck up the National anthem, La marcha real. A curious sight also greeted the Pope on reaching the raised podium that of 60 miniture Swiss Guards, young Spaniards dressed in exact replicas of the famous uniforms of the Papal guard standing to attention beneath the dais.

King Juan Carlos, who despite recent surgery insisted on being present, then addressed the Holy Father on behalf of his nation: “Holy Father, you are back in Spain for the second time, our young people are waiting for you with open arms”.
Then it was Pope Benedict XVI’ turn to speak to the people of Spain and he began by thanking them: “A very grateful greeting goes to those who, with such commitment and dedication, from the ecclesiastical and civil spheres, have contributed with their efforts and work” for World Youth Day in Madrid”. In particular, he thanked “with all my heart” the families, parishes, schools and other institutions that for their hospitality in welcoming young people from all over the world.

However, even though this 4 day visit is also a state visit, there was no escaping the main focus of the Pope’s presence in Spain, the 26th World Youth Day . He said, “young followers of Jesus must be aided to remain firm in the faith”, without hiding their Christian identity, “living together with other legitimate choices in a spirit of respect while at the same time demanding due respect for one’s own choices”.

The Pope addressed the challenges of today’s world, a “prevailing superficiality, consumerism and hedonism, the widespread banalization of sexuality, the lack of solidarity, the corruption”. He spoke of the concerns specific to young people: world conflicts, the undermining of the value of the human person because of “selfish, material and ideological interests”; environmental degradation, uncertainty over their future, an increasingly precarious workplace, drug abuse. “There are even some”, said Pope Benedict “who because of their faith in Christ, suffer discrimination which leads to contempt and persecution, open or hidden, which they endure in various regions and countries. They are harassed to give him up, depriving them of the signs of his presence in public life, not allowing even the mention of his holy name”. To them he said “again he said to them; do not be ashamed of the Lord. He did not spare himself in becoming one like us and in experiencing our anguish so as to lift it up to God, and in this way he saved us”.
Concluding the Pope paid tribute to the countless men and women missionaries who left their homeland to bring the Gospel to all four corners of the world, inviting Spaniards to care constructively for this “great treasure”

PRESS CONFERENCE ON PLANE TO MADRID


The following are some questions from journalists who were present on the papal flight to Madrid.

Q. - Holiness, welcome among us, thanks a lot - as usual - for giving us the opportunity for a brief meeting during the outbound flight. The "flying community" of journalists here, is composed of 56 people from many different countries, but the journalists who await you in Madrid number more than 4 000, in fact there are almost 5 000. This is a record for Spain and also for the coverage of a world event. We will make it our duty, of course, to give an adequate echo to your words during this wonderful event. As usual, I propose a few questions that I have been given in the past days by the journalists present here.

Q. - Holy Father, this is the 26th World Youth Day, and the 12th celebrated with a big international meeting. John Paul II, who invented them, is now a Blessed and is the Official Patron of this World Youth Day in Madrid. At the beginning of your pontificate we had wondered whether you would continue the line of your predecessor. Now you are already marking the third World Youth Day since then, after Cologne and Sydney. What is the significance of these events in the pastoral "strategy" of the Universal Church in the third millennium?

A. - Dear friends, greetnigs! I'm happy to go with you to Spain for this great event. After having personally experienced two WYD, I can only say that it was truly an inspiration that had been given to Pope John Paul II when he created the idea of a large gathering of young people and of the world with the Lord. I would say that these WYD are a signal, a cascade of light; they give visibility to the faith, of God's presence in the world, and thus foster the courage to be a believer. Believers often feel isolated in this world, almost lost. Here they see that they are not alone, that there is a large network of faith, a great community of believers in the world, that it is nice to live in this universal bond of friendship. And it is thus that I think friendships are born, friendships across the boundaries of different cultures and different countries. It is this birth of a universal network of friendship, which links the world and God, and is an important reality for the future of humanity and for the life of humanity today. Of course, World Youth Day cannot be an isolated incident: it is part of a larger journey, which has been prepared by the way of the Cross which has travelled to different countries already uniting young people in the sign of the Cross and the wonderful sign of the Virgin Mary. And thus it is that the preparation for World Youth Day is much more than the logistics of planning an event which naturally has many technical problems. It is requires an inner preparation, a willingness to join a path that brings us to others so that we can journey together towards God. And then, later, following the establishment of groups of friends, keeping this universal contact opens the borders of cultures, of human and religious differences, and continues a path which then leads to a new arrival point in a new WYD. It seems to me that the World Youth Day should be considered in this sense, as a sign, a part of a great journey, which creates friendships, open borders and demonstrates that is good to be with God, and that God is with us. In this sense, we want to continue with this great idea of ​​Blessed Pope John Paul II.

Q. - Holiness, times change. Europe and the Western world in general are experiencing a deep economic crisis, which also makes manifest serious social and moral problems and a great uncertainty about the future, all of which become particularly painful for young people. In recent days we have seen, for example, the events taking place in Britain, with the outbreak of rebellion and aggression. At the same time there are signs of generous and enthusiastic commitment, of volunteerism and solidarity, by young believers and non-believers. In Madrid we will meet many wonderful young people. What messages can the Church give for the hope and encouragement of the youth of the world, especially those who are now tempted to discouragement and rebellion?
A. – And thus, it is confirmed in the current economic crisis that which had already appeared in previous great crises, that the ethical dimension is not something external to economic problems, but an inner and fundamental dimension. The economy does not only work with a self-regulated market, but needs an ethical way of reasoning in order to work for man. It appears again that what Pope John Paul II had already said in his first social encyclical: man must be the center of the economy and the economy is not to be measured solely according to achieving maximum profits. Its true measure is according to how it serves the good of everyone, including taking responsibility for others, and it works really well only if it works in a humane manner with respect for others. This includes different dimensions. The first is that individuals take responsibility for their nation and not just for themselves. The second is that nations must take responsibility for the world - beyond their own national interests, even a continent like Europe must not think only of its own good but assume responsibility for all of humanity and should always think about its economic problems in the light of this responsibility for other parts of the world: for those who are suffering, thirsty and hungry, and have no future. And then - the third dimension of this responsibility – is the responsibility for the future. We know that we must protect our planet, but we must protect - all in all - the functioning of the service of economic work for everyone by reckoning that tomorrow is also today. If the youth of today have no prospects in life, our today has made a mistake and is 'evil'. Therefore, the Church with her social doctrine, with its doctrine of responsibility to God, opens man up to the possibility of renouncing profit and seeing things in the religious and humanistic dimension, that is to live for one another. Thus open even the paths. The large number of volunteers who work in different parts of the world, not for themselves but for others, and thereby find meaning in life, show that this is possible and that educating young people to aspire to these great purposes, such as the Church is trying to do, is essential for our future.

Q. - Holiness, the youth of the world today generally live in multi-confessional and multicultural environments. Mutual tolerance is more essential than ever. You always insist on the topic of truth. Do you not think that this insistence on the truth and the unique Truth that is Christ is a problem for today's youth? Do you not think that this insistence leads them to positions of opposition and to difficulty in trying to dialogue and search together with others?

A. - The connection between truth and intolerance, monotheism and the incapacity to dialogue with others, is a topic that often comes back in the debate on Christianity today. And of course, it is true that in history there have been abuses, both of the concept of truth and the concept of monotheism; but one needs to recognize these as abuses. The reality is totally different. The argument is wrong, because truth is accessible only in freedom. You can impose upon others through violence, rules of conduct, outward observances, and activities - but not the truth! Truth is only open to freedom, and free consent: freedom and truth are so intimately united, that the one is the condition for the other. And for the rest, to seek the truth, the real values that give life and orient us to our future without alternatives. We do not want lies, we do not want the positivism of norms imposed by certain kinds of force, because only true values lead to the future and therefore we say that it is necessary to seek these true values and not let the arbitrariness of some run the day. Do not let a positivist manner of thinking set in that tells us, about ethical problems, and man's greatest problems: that there is no rational truth. This would really expose man to the arbitrariness of those who have power. We must always seek the truth and true values; we have a core of values, in fundamental human rights, and other similar elements which are recognized, and it is these which enable us to be in dialogue with one another. Truth as such is dialogic because it seeks to know better, understand better and it does so in dialogue with others. Thus, to seek the truth and the dignity of man is the greatest defense of freedom.

Q. - Holiness, the World Youth Days are a wonderful time and bring forth a lot of enthusiasm, but the young people then come home and find a world where religious practice is declining very strong. Many of them probably will not be seen any more in Church. How can we prolong the fruits of World Youth Day? Do you think that they actually give the long-term fruits beyond the moments of great enthusiasm?

RProposed questions for the Holy Father on the occasion of the trip to Spain
(As usual, I picked some questions from journalists who will be present on the papal flight for a conversation on the plane with the Holy Father.)

D. - Holiness, welcome among us, thanks a lot - as usual - for giving us the opportunity for a brief meeting during the outbound flight. The "flying community" of journalists here, is composed of 56 people from many different countries, but the journalists who await you in Madrid number more than 4 000, in fact there are almost 5 000. This is a record for Spain and also for the coverage of a world event. We will make it our duty, of course, to give an adequate echo to your words during this wonderful event. As usual, I propose a few questions that I have been given in the past days by the journalists present here.

Holy Father, this is the 26th World Youth Day, and the 12th celebrated with a big international meeting. John Paul II, who invented them, is now a Blessed and is the Official Patron of this World Youth Day in Madrid. At the beginning of your pontificate we had wondered whether you would continue the line of your predecessor. Now you are already marking the third World Youth Day since then, after Cologne and Sydney. What is the significance of these events in the pastoral "strategy" of the Universal Church in the third millennium?

R. - Dear friends, greetnigs! I'm happy to go with you to Spain for this great event. After having personally experienced two WYD, I can only say that it was truly an inspiration that had been given to Pope John Paul II when he created the idea of a large gathering of young people and of the world with the Lord. I would say that these WYD are a signal, a cascade of light; they give visibility to the faith, of God's presence in the world, and thus foster the courage to be a believer. Believers often feel isolated in this world, almost lost. Here they see that they are not alone, that there is a large network of faith, a great community of believers in the world, that it is nice to live in this universal bond of friendship. And it is thus that I think friendships are born, friendships across the boundaries of different cultures and different countries. It is this birth of a universal network of friendship, which links the world and God, and is an important reality for the future of humanity and for the life of humanity today. Of course, World Youth Day cannot be an isolated incident: it is part of a larger journey, which has been prepared by the way of the Cross which has travelled to different countries already uniting young people in the sign of the Cross and the wonderful sign of the Virgin Mary. And thus it is that the preparation for World Youth Day is much more than the logistics of planning an event which naturally has many technical problems. It is requires an inner preparation, a willingness to join a path that brings us to others so that we can journey together towards God. And then, later, following the establishment of groups of friends, keeping this universal contact opens the borders of cultures, of human and religious differences, and continues a path which then leads to a new arrival point in a new WYD. It seems to me that the World Youth Day should be considered in this sense, as a sign, a part of a great journey, which creates friendships, open borders and demonstrates that is good to be with God, and that God is with us. In this sense, we want to continue with this great idea of ​​Blessed Pope John Paul II.
D. - Holiness, times change. Europe and the Western world in general are experiencing a deep economic crisis, which also makes manifest serious social and moral problems and a great uncertainty about the future, all of which become particularly painful for young people. In recent days we have seen, for example, the events taking place in Britain, with the outbreak of rebellion and aggression. At the same time there are signs of generous and enthusiastic commitment, of volunteerism and solidarity, by young believers and non-believers. In Madrid we will meet many wonderful young people. What messages can the Church give for the hope and encouragement of the youth of the world, especially those who are now tempted to discouragement and rebellion?

R. – And thus, it is confirmed in the current economic crisis that which had already appeared in previous great crises, that the ethical dimension is not something external to economic problems, but an inner and fundamental dimension. The economy does not only work with a self-regulated market, but needs an ethical way of reasoning in order to work for man. It appears again that what Pope John Paul II had already said in his first social encyclical: man must be the center of the economy and the economy is not to be measured solely according to achieving maximum profits. Its true measure is according to how it serves the good of everyone, including taking responsibility for others, and it works really well only if it works in a humane manner with respect for others. This includes different dimensions. The first is that individuals take responsibility for their nation and not just for themselves. The second is that nations must take responsibility for the world - beyond their own national interests, even a continent like Europe must not think only of its own good but assume responsibility for all of humanity and should always think about its economic problems in the light of this responsibility for other parts of the world: for those who are suffering, thirsty and hungry, and have no future. And then - the third dimension of this responsibility – is the responsibility for the future. We know that we must protect our planet, but we must protect - all in all - the functioning of the service of economic work for everyone by reckoning that tomorrow is also today. If the youth of today have no prospects in life, our today has made a mistake and is 'evil'. Therefore, the Church with her social doctrine, with its doctrine of responsibility to God, opens man up to the possibility of renouncing profit and seeing things in the religious and humanistic dimension, that is to live for one another. Thus open even the paths. The large number of volunteers who work in different parts of the world, not for themselves but for others, and thereby find meaning in life, show that this is possible and that educating young people to aspire to these great purposes, such as the Church is trying to do, is essential for our future.

D. - Holiness, the youth of the world today generally live in multi-confessional and multicultural environments. Mutual tolerance is more essential than ever. You always insist on the topic of truth. Do you not think that this insistence on the truth and the unique Truth that is Christ is a problem for today's youth? Do you not think that this insistence leads them to positions of opposition and to difficulty in trying to dialogue and search together with others?

R. - The connection between truth and intolerance, monotheism and the incapacity to dialogue with others, is a topic that often comes back in the debate on Christianity today. And of course, it is true that in history there have been abuses, both of the concept of truth and the concept of monotheism; but one needs to recognize these as abuses. The reality is totally different. The argument is wrong, because truth is accessible only in freedom. You can impose upon others through violence, rules of conduct, outward observances, and activities - but not the truth! Truth is only open to freedom, and free consent: freedom and truth are so intimately united, that the one is the condition for the other. And for the rest, to seek the truth, the real values ​​that give life and future and without alternatives. We do not want lies, we do not want the positivism of norms imposed by certain kinds of force, only true values ​​lead to the future and therefore we say that it is necessary to seek these true values ​​and not let the arbitrariness of some run. Do not let a positivist manner of thinking set in that tells us, about ethical problems, and man's greatest problems: that there is no rational truth. This would really expose man to the arbitrariness of those who have power. We must always seek the truth and true values; we have a core of values, in fundamental human rights, and other similar elements which are recognized, and it is these which enable us to be in dialogue with one another. Truth as such is dialogic because it seeks to know better, understand better and it does so in dialogue with others. Thus, to seek the truth and the dignity of man is the greatest defense of freedom.

D. - Holiness, the World Youth Days are a wonderful time and bring forth a lot of enthusiasm, but the young people then come home and find a world where religious practice is declining very strong. Many of them probably will not be seen any more in Church. How can we prolong the fruits of World Youth Day? Do you think that they actually give the long-term fruits beyond the moments of great enthusiasm?

R. - The seed of God is always silent, it does not immediately make itself known in statistics. And with the seeds which the Lord plants through World Youth Day, we can see the seeds of which the Gospel speaks: some fall on the road and are lost, some fall on the stone and are lost, some fall among thorns and are lost, but some fall on good soil and bear an abundance of fruit. And so it is with the sowing of the seeds by WYD: much are lost - and this is human. In another word of the Lord: the mustard seed is small, but grows into a large tree. In other words, of course, much is lost, we cannot say that from tomorrow there will begin a large growth of the Church. God does not act this way. But the seed does grow in silence. I know from the other WYDs that many friendships are born, friendships for life; many new experiences show that God exists. And in this quiet growth we place our confidence and we are sure, even if the statistics do not talk say much, that the seed really does grow, the seed of the Lord, and it will be for many people the beginning of a friendship with God and with others, of a widening of how one thinks, of a shared responsibility that really show us that these days bear fruit. Thanks!

D. - Thank you, Your Holiness, for this conversation that already points us towards the essential themes of these beautiful days. We wish you, of course, all the best and it is our sincere hope that these days - despite the heat – be full of joy and satisfaction for you. However, before we leave you to return to your place, I wanted to say that also for our community today is a day of special celebration, because one of our deans, who had accompanied John Paul II on all of his many trips, except one because she was not very well at the time, celebrates her birthday today. We of course are referring to Paloma Gomez Borrero to whom we all extend good wishes, along with you.

A. - The seed of God is always silent, it does not immediately make itself known in statistics. And with the seeds which the Lord plants through World Youth Day, we can see the seeds of which the Gospel speaks: some fall on the road and are lost, some fall on the stone and are lost, some fall among thorns and are lost, but some fall on good soil and bear an abundance of fruit. And so it is with the sowing of the seeds by WYD: much are lost - and this is human. In another word of the Lord: the mustard seed is small, but grows into a large tree. In other words, of course, much is lost, we cannot say that from tomorrow there will begin a large growth of the Church. God does not act this way. But the seed does grow in silence. I know from the other WYDs that many friendships are born, friendships for life; many new experiences show that God exists. And in this quiet growth we place our confidence and we are sure, even if the statistics do not talk say much, that the seed really does grow, the seed of the Lord, and it will be for many people the beginning of a friendship with God and with others, of a widening of how one thinks, of a shared responsibility that really show us that these days bear fruit. Thanks!

Q. - Thank you, Your Holiness, for this conversation that already points us towards the essential themes of these beautiful days. We wish you, of course, all the best and it is our sincere hope that these days - despite the heat – be full of joy and satisfaction for you. However, before we leave you to return to your place, I wanted to say that also for our community today is a day of special celebration, because one of our deans, who had accompanied John Paul II on all of his many trips, except one because she was not very well at the time, celebrates her birthday today. We of course are referring to Paloma Gomez Borrero to whom we all extend good wishes, along with you.
SOURCE IMAGES/ARTICLES: RADIO VATICANA

EUROPE: WYD: GOODNESS REIGNS FILM FESTIVAL FOR PILGRIMS

WYD MADRID11.COM REPORT: Goodness Reigns Film Festivalgoodness_reigns1

August 17, 2011. Volunteers rolled out the red carpet yesterday for World Youth Day´s mini film festival. Instead of sequined evening gowns and tuxedoes, there was every variety of JMJ apparel. Theatres on Calle Fuencarral debuted films all afternoon, shuffling ever cheerful pilgrims in and out.

The Goodness Reigns Share the Story Short Film Festival featured the winning results of a contest that began over a year ago hoping to promote sharing the message of Truth through different categories for different age groups. Winners had the option to receive a film making package or all expense paid trips to World Youth Day.

The lights dimmed and host Mario St. Francis began to present the films.

He invited the creators of each film to come down and talk a little about their film and the process of creating it.

goodness_reigns2The films creatively portrayed each of the topics in a variety of ways, from straight up interviews to paper animation to dramatizations of real events. The majority of the creators are very active in Youth Groups, or work as CCD/Religious Education teachers or have studied film making and were interested in incorporating their Faith into their studies. Several of the winners mentioned John Paul II´s Letter to Artists as a primary inspiration.

While everyone had a story for how this opportunity worked in their lives, one student and her teacher had a particularly inspiring story.

“Vigils and Hope” promotes the power of prayer by recognizing the victims of homicide in Milwaukee, WI. Created by the Broadcast Media Class at Messmer High School in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, these students entered their film in the Missionary Spirit category.

Chabeli Romero was one of the leaders and organizers of creating the film, says Maripat Wilkinson, the broadcast media instructor who originally came up with the idea for the class to enter the Goodness Reigns contest. “She kept every one motivated to keep their eyes on the prize.”

“The idea of the video was to raise awareness and to show how a small group of students can make a difference,” Chabeli says.

The film is about the victims of homicides from Milkwaukee, Wisconsin in 2010. These students participated in prayer vigils for the victims and created this film in order to raise awareness among their community in hopes to end the violence.

The creation of this film affect each and every one of the students in the class, “It was very emotion, they were not numbers but people,” says Maripat. Several of the students in the class knew or were related to the victims. “One of the blessings of the film was that we were able to rally around our own.”

goodness_reigns3

“Facing how horrible and prevalent homicide is in the city, it became very real and the list kept growing. We reached 108 on December 31 in 2010,” she adds.

Around late spring, the class discovered that while their film had not won a trip to World Youth, they were invited to come because their film would be shown at the film festival. But by the middle of July, the class faced the hard reality that there was no money to be had to fund the trip.

Thanks to the efforts of Suzanne Haugh, the director of Goodness Reigns, a donor was found and Chabeli and Maripat were able to come to the premier of the film they worked so hard on.

“I hope they take from this film the fact that a small group of people can make such a huge impact.”

Chabeli said she hopes that people will be able to take this back to their home towns and will be inspired to raise awareness of what is going on in their own communities and will work to make a difference.

Both Chabeli and her teacher, Maripat, emphasized the important of the prayer vigils that were held, “Prayer makes a difference.”

Goodness Reigns has posted all of the entries on their website,http://goodnessreigns.com/vote/page/7/, where you can find Vigils and Hope.

http://www.madrid11.com/en/noticias/1618-raising-awareness-through-prayer-and-film

AUSTRALIA: WYD PILGRIMS HEAR FROM CARDINAL PELL

Sydney Archdiocese REPORT
18 Aug 2011

Cardinal Pell during the Mass following the Catechetical

Session in Madrid

More than 10,000 young pilgrims from Australia and all corners of the globe gathered in Madrid today to hear the Archbishop of Sydney, Cardinal George Pell give one of the first catechesis sessions at World Youth Day in Madrid.

Cardinal Pell's underlying message to the pilgrims was one of hope and encouragement.

He urged the young pilgrims to keep the flame of faith burning.

"Promise the flame of faith will not be extinguished in your watch," he said.

The Cardinal received a rousing, warm welcome when he was introduced by one of the Sisters of Life, who are not only assisting in the catechesis sessions by providing talks and testimonies, music and prayer but are also doubling as stage managers at Madrid's Palacio de los Deportes stadium which has been temporarily re-named the "Love and Life Centre."

10,000 pilgrims attended the Palacio de Palacio de los

Deportes stadium for the catechesis

Cardinal Pell said the fundamental reason for hope comes from one of his favourite scripture passages, the story of the good thief.

He quoted the good thief's words to Jesus on the cross: "Remember me when you come into my kingdom" and Jesus' reply: "this very day you will be with me in paradise".

"This gives hope to us," Cardinal Pell said. "However, I think one of the most disturbing passages in the scriptures is when Jesus asks 'when he Son of Man returns, will he find faith on earth?' Faith is a fundamental life choice. It can wax and wane. But Our Lord constantly encourages us to strengthen our faith. And our faith comes through us through the Catholic Church. There is no knowledge of God except through the Catholic Church and our faith comes to us across the generations."

There were moments of concentrated attention as the Cardinal spoke with the silence frequently broken by cheers and applause.

The message for the pilgrims was patent, with Cardinal Pell explaining the clear and strong reasons behind our belief in the one true God.

Supersized screens throughout the venue enabled

everyone to see and hear the Cardinal

He said it is reasonable to believe in our Creator and He is good.

"Christian belief is not a myth of just a useful make-believe story like Santa Claus," he said. "Our God is inherently rational. Our faith is not based on religious sentiment. Faith is a matter of the heart, an issue of the mind, because it is a claim to truth."

The Cardinal also threw out a challenge to the young pilgrims, telling them that we are presented with two choices - whether our existence came about by chance or by supreme intelligence.

What did they think? He asked. He then presented the case for supreme intelligence, giving the thousands of young people much to think about and reflect upon.

Emphasising the point that science and religion are not at loggerheads, he said and quoted the late, former atheist and renowned philosopher, Anthony Flew who after turning his back on atheism at the end of his life to become a believer, said that the greatest discovery of modern science was God.

The Altar was place on the centre stage for the Mass

following the Catechetical Session

Anthony Flew became a believer through the discovery of DNA.

"We need to remember science is with us and that our God of love, that dynamo of love, is rational," the Cardinal said. "So let's commit ourselves to maintaining the light of our faith and that the flame doesn't die in your families or parishes."

In his closing remarks, Cardinal Pell quoted from the great early Christian, St Augustine who said: "....when we part from one another let us not part from God".

Following the catechesis Cardinal Pell celebrated Mass with more than 1000 priests concelebrating. The Cardinal then distributed communion together with the concelebrating priests who moved through the massive crowd to every corner of the huge stadium.

Stationary cameras as well as a crane camera captured every moment of the Cardinal's catechesis at World Youth Day, which was then transmitted onto super-sized screen in order for 10,000 plus pilgrims present to see and hear every detail of events as they unfolded.

Cardinal Pell: "When we part from one another, let us

not part from God."

At another location in Madrid during the Cardinal's catechesis many of the 24 Australian bishops present at WYD11 were also taking part in a catechetical session and Mass.

Today, Thursday 18 August, excitement is building in anticipation of the arrival of His Holiness, Pope Benedict XV1 whose flight is due to touch down at Madrid Airport at 12 noon (8 pm AEST).

The Pontiff will be welcomed at the airport by Spain's King Juan Carlos, Queen Sofia together with Church and Spanish government officials. He will then rest prior to attending a special youth welcome in the city in the evening when he will be presented with the keys to the city

The Holy Father will then address the gathering in the city centre at Madrid's, Cibeles Square.

Security has been tightened around the Square with police "locking down" the area with officers on the ground and helicopters above the central streets leading to the square.

http://www.sydney.catholic.org.au/news/latest_news/2011/2011818_721.shtml

AMERICA: CANADA: RIP- ARCHBISHOP EMERITUS BURKE- HALIFAX, NOVA SCOTIA

CCCB – report… It is with deep sadness that we announce the death of the Most Reverend Austin-Emile Burke, Archbishop Emeritus of Halifax. He passed away peacefully on Friday, August 12, 2011 at 89 years of age.

burke

Born in Sluice Pointe, in Yarmouth County, Archbishop Burke was ordained a priest of the Archdiocese of Halifax on March 25, 1950. On May 14, 1968, he was ordained Bishop of Yarmouth, where he remained for 23 years. Pope John-Paul II appointed him as Archbishop of Halifax on July 8, 1991, until he retired on January 13, 1998.

In addition to providing pastoral leadership for the People of God in the Diocese of Yarmouth and the Archdiocese of Halifax, Archbishop Burke has served as President of the Atlantic Episcopal Assembly, Co-Treasurer of the Permanent Council of the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops (CCCB) and as a member of several CCCB commissions. He was a founding member of the Catholic Organization for Life and Family. Among highlights of his Episcopal ministry as Archbishop of Halifax was his hosting of the annual plenary meeting of the CCCB in 1996. During this event, the bishops of Canada issued an important statement on poverty entitled, The Struggle Against Poverty: A Sign of Hope for Our World.

Archbishop Burke has laid in state at St. Mary’s Cathedral Basilica, in Halifax since Sunday, August 14, 2011. Visitations will continue on Monday, August 15, from 8:00 p.m. until 10:00 p.m., in the Lady Chapel, with a Vigil Service at 7:00 p.m., and on Tuesday, August 16, as of 12 noon. The funeral will take place at 2:00 p.m.

ASIA: PAKISTAN: SEVERE FLOOD DAMAGE- CARITAS BUILDS HOMES FOR VICTIMS

Construction materials provided for first batch of some 500 houses for flood victims
ucanews.com reporter, Haji Jano Machi
Pakistan
August 4, 2011
Catholic Church News Image of Caritas starts home-building project
Caritas Pakistan staff at the foundation stone ceremony for construction of houses in a village of Sindh province

Caritas Pakistan announced today in a statement it has started the construction of 500 houses for flood victims in a southern province.

“This is our Eid gift for you; we are pleased to share your grief. Educating your children will further help in upbringing your lives” said Shamas Shamaun, executive secretary of Caritas Pakistan Hyderabad, after laying the foundation stone earlier for construction of houses in Haji Jano Machi village in Sindh province.

The beneficiaries, most of them Muslims, presented ajraks (cultural shawls) to Caritas Pakistan workers at the ceremony.

Caritas Pakistan Hyderabad plans to underwrite construction of 500 shelters in the two districts worst hit by devastating floods last year.

“We are only providing construction materials for semi-permanent houses; this will avert other issues relating land ownership”, said Shamaun, adding that many are still living in damaged thatched sheds a year after the floods.

A cement base will protect the houses in the ongoing moonsoon season, said Shamaun.

Caritas Pakistan supported 48,000 families, including 2,950 belonging to minority communities, during the relief phase which concluded earlier this year.

Meanwhile villagers have slowly started sowing crops on the lands once covered in flood water. “Soil texture has changed after the disaster; the fertility has increased in some parts while land was destroyed in others”, said Kaiser Heru, a Hindu village chief.

http://www.ucanews.com/2011/08/04/caritas-starts-home-building-project/

AFRICA: MALAWI: INTER-FAITH PRAYER MEETING FOR PEACE

Agenzia Fides REPORT - The police have intensified controls in the major cities in Malawi although the protest planned for yesterday, August 17 was postponed (see Fides 17/8/2011). Opposition parties have given the government a month to respond to their requests. Otherwise a national demonstration of protest has been called for September 17. Even
the prayer vigil organized by religious communities in the country, which should have been held in conjunction with the event, was postponed.
On 16 August, however, a prayer meeting at Comesa Hall in Blantyre was held.
"There were representatives of Christian churches and Islamic community in the big room, who even in the month of Ramadan and fasting wanted to be present" , says Fr. Piergiorgio Gamba to Fides, a Monfort missionary who has been living and working in the country for decades.
"On this occasion, the religious communities showed a great maturity in faith. Churches are concerned about the fears of the population, and were able to report to the President in person what people are still not allowed to say freely", says the missionary.
The theme of the prayer was "A Nation Seeking God's Intervention in Forgiveness, Reconciliation and Peace",
"Different preachers spoke, alternating with the choir who sang the psalms", continues Fr. Gamba. " Everyone emphasized that a storm is devastating Malawi and risks destroying the Country's future. But it was Mgr. Joseph Mukasa Zuza’s sermon, Bishop of Mzuzu and President of the Episcopal Conference of Malawi, which analyzed the problem concerning the clash between the ruling class and the people of Malawi. Mgr. Zuza said, among other things, in his homily that the Presidency must stop suffocating civil society, the press, the judiciary power and democracy".
"The Catholic Church were able to write a page worthy of the pastoral letter of 1992 (which was the go-ahead for the process of return of democracy after a long dictatorship). Twenty years later this church has become an adult and deserves all the respect of the faithful and the Country " concludes the missionary. (L.M.)

TODAY'S SAINT: AUG. 18: ST. HELENA

St. Helena

WIDOW, MOTHER OF CONSTANTINE

Feast: August 18



Information:

Feast Day:August 18
Born:

248, Drepanum, Bithynia, Asia Minor

Died:328, Constantinople, Roman
Major Shrine:The shrine to Saint Helena in St. Peter's Basilica
Patron of:archeologists, converts, difficult marriages, divorced people, empresses, Helena, the capital of Montana

The mother of Constantine the Great, born about the middle of the third century, possibly in Drepanum (later known as Helenopolis) on the Nicomedian Gulf; died about 330. She was of humble parentage; St. Ambrose, in his "Oratio de obitu Theodosii", referred to her as a stabularia, or inn-keeper. Nevertheless, she became the lawful wife of Constantius Chlorus. Her first and only son, Constantine, was born in Naissus in Upper Moesia, in the year 274. The statement made by English chroniclers of the Middle Ages, according to which Helena was supposed to have been the daughter of a British prince, is entirely without historical foundation. It may arise from the misinterpretation of a term used in the fourth chapter of the panegyric on Constantine's marriage with Fausta, that Constantine, oriendo (i.e., "by his beginnings," "from the outset") had honoured Britain, which was taken as an allusion to his birth, whereas the reference was really to the beginning of his reign.

In the year 292 Constantius, having become co-Regent of the West, gave himself up to considerations of a political nature and forsook Helena in order to marry Theodora, the step-daughter of Emperor Maximinianus Herculius, his patron, and well-wisher. But her son remained faithful and loyal to her. On the death of Constantius Chlorus, in 308, Constantine, who succeeded him, summoned his mother to the imperial court, conferred on her the title of Augusta, ordered that all honour should be paid her as the mother of the sovereign, and had coins struck bearing her effigy. Her son's influence caused her to embrace Christianity after his victory over Maxentius. This is directly attested by Eusebius (Vita Constantini, III, xlvii): "She (his mother) became under his (Constantine's) influence such a devout servant of God, that one might believe her to have been from her very childhood a disciple of the Redeemer of mankind". It is also clear from the declaration of the contemporary historian of the Church that Helena, from the time of her conversion had an earnestly Christian life and by her influence and liberality favoured the wider spread of Christianity. Tradition links her name with the building of Christian churches in the cities of the West, where the imperial court resided, notably at Rome and Trier, and there is no reason for rejecting this tradition, for we know positively through Eusebius that Helena erected churches on the hallowed spots of Palestine. Despite her advanced age she undertook a journey to Palestine when Constantine, through his victory over Licinius, had become sole master of the Roman Empire, subsequently, therefore, to the year 324. It was in Palestine, as we learn from Eusebius (loc. cit., xlii), that she had resolved to bring to God, the King of kings, the homage and tribute of her devotion. She lavished on that land her bounties and good deeds, she "explored it with remarkable discernment", and "visited it with the care and solicitude of the emperor himself". Then, when she "had shown dueveneration to the footsteps of the Saviour", she had two churches erected for the worship of God: one was raised in Bethlehem near the Grotto of the Nativity, the other on the Mount of the Ascension, near Jerusalem. She also embellished the sacred grotto with rich ornaments. This sojourn in Jerusalem proved the starting-point of the legend first recorded by Rufinus as to the discovery of the Cross of Christ.

Her princely munificence was such that, according to Eusebius, she assisted not only individuals but entire communities. The poor and destitute were the special objects of her charity. She visited the churches everywhere with pious zeal and made them rich donations. It was thus that, in fulfilment of the Saviour's precept, she brought forth abundant fruit in word and deed. If Helena conducted herself in this manner while in the Holy Land, which is indeed testified to by Eusebius, Bishop of Caesarea in Palestine, we should not doubt that she manifested the same piety and benevolence in those other cities of the empire in which she resided after her conversion. Her memory in Rome is chiefly identified with the church of S. Croce in Gerusalemme. On the present location of this church formerly stood the Palatium Sessorianum, and near by were the Thermae Helenianae, which baths derived their name from the empress. Here two inscriptions were found composed in honour of Helena. The Sessorium, which was near the site of the Lateran, probably served as Helena's residence when she stayed in Rome; so that it is quite possible for a Christian basilica to have been erected on this spot by Constantine, at her suggestion and in honour of the true Cross.

Helena was still living in the year 326, when Constantine ordered the execution of his son Crispus. When, according to Socrates' account (Church History I.17), the emperor in 327 improved Drepanum, his mother's native town, and decreed that it should be called Helenopolis, it is probable that the latter returned from Palestine to her son who was then residing in the Orient. Constantine was with her when she died, at the advanced age of eighty years or thereabouts (Eusebius, Life of Constantine III.46). This must have been about the year 330, for the last coins which are known to have been stamped with her name bore this date. Her body was brought to Constantinople and laid to rest in the imperial vault of the church of the Apostles. It is presumed that her remains were transferred in 849 to the Abbey of Hautvillers, in the French Archdiocese of Reims, as recorded by the monk Altmann in his "Translatio". She was revered as a saint, and the veneration spread, early in the ninth century, even to Western countries. Her feast falls on 18 August. Regarding the finding of the Holy Cross by St. Helena, see CROSS AND CRUCIFIX.



Read more: http://www.ewtn.com/saintsHoly/saints/H/sthelena.asp#ixzz1VOTIi06U

TODAY'S SAINT: AUG. 18: ST. JANE FRANCES DE CHANTAL

St. Jane Frances de Chantal

FOUNDRESS

Feast: August 12



Information:

Feast Day:August 12
Born:January 28, 1572, Dijon, Burgundy, France
Died:December 13, 1641, Moulins, France
Canonized:July 16, 1767, Rome by Pope Clement XIII
Major Shrine:Annecy, Savoy
Patron of:forgotten people; in-law problems; loss of parents; parents separated from children; widows

Born at Dijon, France, 28 January, 1572; died at the Visitation Convent Moulins, 13 December, 1641.

Her father was president of the Parliament of Burgundy, and leader of the royalist party during the League that brought about the triumph of the cause of Henry IV. In 1592 she married Baron de Chantal, and lived in the feudal castle of Bourbilly. She restored order in the household, which was on the brink of ruin, and brought back prosperity. During her husband's absence at the court, or with the army, when reproached for her extremely sober manner of dressing, her reply was: "The eyes which I must please are a hundred miles from here". She found more than once that God blessed with miracles the care she gave the suffering members of Christ. St. Francis de Sales' eulogy of her characterizes her life at Bourbilly and everywhere else: "In Madame de Chantal I have found the perfect woman, whom Solomon had difficulty in finding in Jerusalem". Baron de Chantal was accidently killed by a harquebus while out shooting in 1601. Left a widow at twenty-eight, with four children, the broken-hearted baroness took a vow of chastity. In all her prayers she besought God to send her a guide and God, in a vision, showed her the spiritual director He held in reserve for her. In order to safeguard her children's property, she was obliged to go and live at Monthelon in the home of her father-in-law, who was ruled over by an arrogant and wicked servant. This was real servitude, which she bore patiently and gently for seven years. At last her virtue triumphed over the ill will of the old man and house keeper.

During Lent, 1604, she visited her father at Dijon, where St. Francis de Sales was preaching at the Sainte Chapelle. She recognized in him the mysterious director who had been shown her, and placed herself under his guidance. Then began an admirable correspondence between the two saints. Unfortunately, the greater number of letters are no longer in existence, as she destroyed them after the death of the holy bishop. When she had assured the future security of children, and when she had provided the education of Celse-Benigne, her fourteen year old son, whom she left to her father and her brother, the Archbishop of Bourges, she started for Annecy, where God was calling her to found the Congregation of the Visitation. She took her two remaining daughters with her, the elder having recently married the Baron of Thorens, a brother of St. Francis de Sales. Celse-Benigne, impetous like those of her race, barred his mother's way by lying across the threshold. Mme de Chantal stopped, overcome: " Can the tears of a child shake her resolution? " said a holy and learned priest, the tutor of Celse-Benigne. "Oh! no", replied the saint, "but after all I am a mother!" And she stepped over child's body.

The Congregation of the Visitation was canonically established at Annecy on Trinity Sunday, 6 June, 1610. Its aim was to receive, with a view to their spiritual advancement, young girls and even widows who had not the desire or strength to subject themselves to the austere ascetical practices in force in all the religious orders at that time. St. Francis de Sales was especially desirous of seeing the realization of his cherished method of attaining perfection, which consisted in always keeping one's will united to the Divine will, in taking so to speak one's soul, heart, and longings into one's hands and giving them into God's keeping, and in seeking always to do what is pleasing to Him. "I do always the things that please him" (John, viii, 29). The two holy founders saw their undertaking prosper. At the time of the death of St. Francis de Sales in 1622, the order already counted thirteen houses; there were eighty-six when St. Jane Frances died; and 164 when she was canonized.

The remainder of the saint's life was spent under the protection of the cloister in the practice of the most admirable virtues. If a gentle kindness, vivified and strengthened by a complete spirit of renunciation, predominates in St. Francis de Sales, it is firmness and great vigour which prevails in St. Jane Frances; she did not like to see her daughters giving way to human weakness. Her trials were continuous and borne bravely, and yet she was exceedingly sensitive. Celse-Benigne was an incorrigible duellist. She prayed so fervently that he was given the grace to die a Christian death on the battle-field, during the campaign against the Isle of Re (1627). He left a daughter who became the famous Marquise de Sevigne. To family troubles God added interior crosses which, particularly during the last nine years of her life, kept her in agony of soul from which she was not freed until three months before her death.

Her reputation for sanctity was widespread. Queens, princes, and princesses flocked to the reception-room of the Visitation. Wherever she went to establish foundations, the people gave her ovations. "These people", she would say confused, "do not know me; they are mistaken". Her body is venerated with that of St. Francis de Sales in the church of the Visitation at Annecy. She was beatified in 1751, canonized in 1767, and 21 August was appointed as her feast day.

The life of the saint was written in the seventeenth century, with inimitable charm, by her secretary, Mother de Chaugy. Monsignor Bougaud, who died Bishop of Laval, published in 1863 a "Histoire de Sainte Chantal" which had a great and well-deserved success.

The words of the saint comprise instructions on the religious life, various minor works, among which is the admirable "Deposition for the Process of Beatification of St. Francis de Sales", and a great many letters. The Saint's qualities are seen in her precise and vigorous style, void of imagery but betraying a repressed emotion, and bursting forth spontaneously from the heart, anticipating in its method the beautiful French of the seventeenth century. The book which may be called her masterpiece, "Reponses sur les Regles, Constitutions et Coutumes", a truly practical and complete code of the religious life, is not in circulation.



Read more: http://www.ewtn.com/saintsHoly/saints/J/stjanefrancesdechantal.asp#ixzz1VOT7N5MF
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