DONATE TO JCE NEWS

Sunday, May 15, 2011

CATHOLIC NEWS WORLD: SUN. MAY 15, 2011











1

The 48th World Day of Prayer for Vocations, to be celebrated on 15 May 2011, the Fourth Sunday of Easter, invites us to reflect on the theme: “Proposing Vocations in the Local Church”. Seventy years ago, Venerable Pius XII established the Pontifical Work of Priestly Vocations. Similar bodies, led by priests and members of the lay faithful, were subsequently established by Bishops in many dioceses as a response to the call of the Good Shepherd who, “when he saw the crowds, had compassion on them, because they were like sheep without a shepherd”, and went on to say: “The harvest is plentiful but the labourers are few. Pray therefore the Lord of the harvest to send out labourers into his harvest!” (Mt 9:36-38).
The work of carefully encouraging and supporting vocations finds a radiant source of inspiration in those places in the Gospel where Jesus calls his disciples to follow him and trains them with love and care. We should pay close attention to the way that Jesus called his closest associates to proclaim the Kingdom of God (cf. Lk 10:9). In the first place, it is clear that the first thing he did was to pray for them: before calling them, Jesus spent the night alone in prayer, listening to the will of the Father (cf. Lk 6:12) in a spirit of interior detachment from mundane concerns. It is Jesus’ intimate conversation with the Father which results in the calling of his disciples. Vocations to the ministerial priesthood and to the consecrated life are first and foremost the fruit of constant contact with the living God and insistent prayer lifted up to the “Lord of the harvest”, whether in parish communities, in Christian families or in groups specifically devoted to prayer for vocations.
At the beginning of his public life, the Lord called some fishermen on the shore of the Sea of Galilee: “Follow me and I will make you fishers of men” (Mt 4:19). He revealed his messianic mission to them by the many “signs” which showed his love for humanity and the gift of the Father’s mercy. Through his words and his way of life he prepared them to carry on his saving work. Finally, knowing “that his hour had come to depart out of this world to the Father” (Jn 13:1), he entrusted to them the memorial of his death and resurrection, and before ascending into heaven he sent them out to the whole world with the command: “Go, therefore, make disciples of all nations” (Mt 28:19).
It is a challenging and uplifting invitation that Jesus addresses to those to whom he says: “Follow me!”. He invites them to become his friends, to listen attentively to his word and to live with him. He teaches them complete commitment to God and to the extension of his kingdom in accordance with the law of the Gospel: “Unless a grain of wheat falls into the earth and dies, it remains alone; but if it dies, it bears much fruit ” (Jn 12:24). He invites them to leave behind their own narrow agenda and their notions of self-fulfilment in order to immerse themselves in another will, the will of God, and to be guided by it. He gives them an experience of fraternity, one born of that total openness to God (cf. Mt 12:49-50) which becomes the hallmark of the community of Jesus: “By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another” (Jn 13:35).
It is no less challenging to follow Christ today. It means learning to keep our gaze fixed on Jesus, growing close to him, listening to his word and encountering him in the sacraments; it means learning to conform our will to his. This requires a genuine school of formation for all those who would prepare themselves for the ministerial priesthood or the consecrated life under the guidance of the competent ecclesial authorities. The Lord does not fail to call people at every stage of life to share in his mission and to serve the Church in the ordained ministry and in the consecrated life. The Church is “called to safeguard this gift, to esteem it and love it. She is responsible for the birth and development of priestly vocations” (John Paul II, Post-Synodal Apostolic Exhortation Pastores Dabo Vobis, 41). Particularly in these times, when the voice of the Lord seems to be drowned out by “other voices” and his invitation to follow him by the gift of one’s own life may seem too difficult, every Christian community, every member of the Church, needs consciously to feel responsibility for promoting vocations. It is important to encourage and support those who show clear signs of a call to priestly life and religious consecration, and to enable hem to feel the warmth of the whole community as they respond “yes” to God and the Church. I encourage them, in the same words which I addressed to those who have already chosen to enter the seminary: “You have done a good thing. Because people will always have need of God, even in an age marked by technical mastery of the world and globalization: they will always need the God who has revealed himself in Jesus Christ, the God who gathers us together in the universal Church in order to learn with him and through him life’s true meaning and in order to uphold and apply the standards of true humanity” (Letter to Seminarians, 18 October 2010).
It is essential that every local Church become more sensitive and attentive to the pastoral care of vocations, helping children and young people in particular at every level of family, parish and associations – as Jesus did with his disciples - to grow into a genuine and affectionate friendship with the Lord, cultivated through personal and liturgical prayer; to grow in familiarity with the sacred Scriptures and thus to listen attentively and fruitfully to the word of God; to understand that entering into God’s will does not crush or destroy a person, but instead leads to the discovery of the deepest truth about ourselves; and finally to be generous and fraternal in relationships with others, since it is only in being open to the love of God that we discover true joy and the fulfilment of our aspirations. “Proposing Vocations in the Local Church” means having the courage, through an attentive and suitable concern for vocations, to point out this challenging way of following Christ which, because it is so rich in meaning, is capable of engaging the whole of one’s life.
I address a particular word to you, my dear brother Bishops. To ensure the continuity and growth of your saving mission in Christ, you should “foster priestly and religious vocations as much as possible, and should take a special interest in missionary vocations” (Christus Dominus, 15). The Lord needs you to cooperate with him in ensuring that his call reaches the hearts of those whom he has chosen. Choose carefully those who work in the Diocesan Vocations Office, that valuable means for the promotion and organization of the pastoral care of vocations and the prayer which sustains it and guarantees its effectiveness. I would also remind you, dear brother Bishops, of the concern of the universal Church for an equitable distribution of priests in the world. Your openness to the needs of dioceses experiencing a dearth of vocations will become a blessing from God for your communities and a sign to the faithful of a priestly service that generously considers the needs of the entire Church.
The Second Vatican Council explicitly reminded us that “the duty of fostering vocations pertains to the whole Christian community, which should exercise it above all by a fully Christian life” (Optatam Totius, 2). I wish, then, to say a special word of acknowledgment and encouragement to those who work closely in various ways with the priests in their parishes. In particular, I turn to those who can offer a specific contribution to the pastoral care of vocations: to priests, families, catechists and leaders of parish groups. I ask priests to testify to their communion with their bishop and their fellow priests, and thus to provide a rich soil for the seeds of a priestly vocation. May families be “animated by the spirit of faith and love and by the sense of duty” (Optatam Totius, 2) which is capable of helping children to welcome generously the call to priesthood and to religious life. May catechists and leaders of Catholic groups and ecclesial movements, convinced of their educational mission, seek to “guide the young people entrusted to them so that these will recognize and freely accept a divine vocation” (ibid.).
Dear brothers and sisters, your commitment to the promotion and care of vocations becomes most significant and pastorally effective when carried out in the unity of the Church and in the service of communion. For this reason, every moment in the life of the Church community – catechesis, formation meetings, liturgical prayer, pilgrimages – can be a precious opportunity for awakening in the People of God, and in particular in children and young people, a sense of belonging to the Church and of responsibility for answering the call to priesthood and to religious life by a free and informed decision.
The ability to foster vocations is a hallmark of the vitality of a local Church. With trust and perseverance let us invoke the aid of the Virgin Mary, that by the example of her own acceptance of God’s saving plan and her powerful intercession, every community will be more and more open to saying “yes” to the Lord who is constantly calling new labourers to his harvest. With this hope, I cordially impart to all my Apostolic Blessing.

From the Vatican, 15 November 2010

BENEDICTUS PP. XVI


POPE APPEALS FOR PEACE IN LIBYA AND SYRIA

Pope Benedict XVI prayed for peace in Libya and Syria today. In remarks to the faithful at the regina coeliprayer, the Pope said it is with great apprehension that he continues to follow the tragic armed conflict that has caused so great a number of victims and so much suffering in Libya, especially among the civilian population. The Pope went on to renew what he called his, “[P]ressing appeal: that, with the help of international organisations that are looking for a solution to the crisis, the path of negotiation and dialogue may prevail over that of violence.” The Pope also offered his prayerful and heartfelt support for the work the local Church is carrying out on behalf of the population – in particular the work of consecrated persons present in hospitals. Turning to Syria, the Holy Father said, “[I]t is urgent to restore coexistence based on harmony and unity,” and prayed God, “to stop any further bloodshed,” in the country, which he described as, “this homeland of great religions and civilisations.” Pope Benedict also urged both authorities and the whole Syrian citizenry, “to spare no effort in finding the common good and in meeting everyone’s legitimate aspirations for a future of peace and stability.”

The Pope’s appeal came at the end of his traditional Sunday reflection during the noonday prayer of Marian devotion with the faithful in St. Peter’s Square – a reflection that on this 4th Sunday of Easter was dedicated to the figure of the Good Shepherd, in connection with the World Day of Prayer for Vocations.

The Pope prayed especially for an increase in vocations to priesthood and religious life, as well as for an increase in faithfulness and wisdom for all those to whose care Christ has entrusted His flock: priests and bishops, including the bishop of Rome…

I greet with joy the English-speaking visitors gathered here today, and I pray that your pilgrimage to Rome will strengthen your faith and your love for the Lord Jesus. Today we pray especially for vocations to the priesthood and the religious life, asking Christ our Lord to send shepherds to care for his flock, so that God’s people may have life in abundance. Upon all of you I invoke the peace and joy of the Risen Lord!

http://www.radiovaticana.org/en1/Articolo.asp?c=487363

AUSTRALIA: HOLY SPIRIT E-CONFERENCE ON MAY 19

DIOCESE PARRAMATTA REPORT: Thousands of people across Australia and around the world are expected to be online for the Broken Bay Institute’s ‘The Holy Spirit’ eConference on Thursday 19 May.

Institute For Mission, the Parramatta Diocesan Centre for Catholic Adult Faith Formation, is one of the ‘eSites’ hosting the Conference webcast, sharing in the rare opportunity of hearing two keynote educators, Fr Denis Edwards and Sr Janette Gray rsm, as they explore the theme of The Holy Spirit: Giver of Life.

Fr Denis Edward is senior lecturer in theology at the Flinders University School of Theology and Adelaide College of Divinity. He has written extensively on theology and science subjects.

Sr Janette Gray is a Sister of Mercy who lectures in systemic theology at the Jesuit College of Theology in the United Faculty of Theology, Melbourne. Her teaching areas are the theology of the human person, Church, the interface between Church and contemporary society, Church and social responsibility, feminist theology, and Christian-Muslim relations.

The keynote educators will be joined by Fr Chris Ryan MGL (who accompanied the World Youth Day Cross and Icon around Australia prior to WYD 2008 Sydney) and Jan Heath. Mrs Heath was recently involved in the hugely popularPray 2010, and it is anticipated that both speakers will bring an experiential aspect to the eConference.

The fifth eConference to be presented by the Australian Catholic Bishops Conference and the Broken Bay Institute, it is hoped The Holy Spirit eConference will set a new record for the number of people logging on to participate.

Previous eConferences have shared enormous success bringing together more than 30,000 people on each occasion across 28 countries. Many will again watch online from schools, parishes, hospitals, prisons, groups, universities, religious orders and Church agencies.

Support questions are available from the eConference website closer to the event, and all sessions will be archived online to allow for repeat visits.

The Holy Spirit eConference will be streaming from 10.30am to 3.15pm on 19 May.

If you would like to join in the eConference at the Institute For Mission (IFM) eSite at 1-5 Marion Street Blacktown, bookings are essential.

Please contact IFM by phone on 02 9831 4911 or emailmh@instituteformission.com.au

Attendance at the IFM eSite is free and tea and coffee will be provided, however, participants are asked to bring their own lunch on the day.

Visit IFM

Learn more about The Holy Spirit eConference at the Broken Bay Institute

AMERICA: USA: FR. MOLINA NAMED DIRECTOR OF LATIN CHURCH

USCCB REPORT: Father Juan Molina Named Director for Church in Latin America

WASHINGTON (May 12, 2011)—Trinitarian Father Juan J. Molina has been named associate director of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) Office of National Collections and director for the Church in Latin America. Father Molina is currently serving as policy advisor for Latin America and Global Trade in the Office of International Justice and Peace at USCCB and previously served as advocacy program coordinator in the Southwest regional office of Catholic Relief Services.

“Father Molina’s qualifications and skills made him a perfect choice for this position,” said Patrick Markey, executive director of the USCCB Office of National Collections. “Father Molina’s knowledge of the region, his existing relationships with the Church in Latin America, and his deep knowledge and broad experience in the work of the Church will help him transition well into a program that is already recognized for the excellent work Father Andrew Small did to support the USCCB’s commitment to the Church in Latin America, especially regarding Haiti.”

In March, the Vatican appointed Oblate of Mary Immaculate Father Andrew Small as national director of the Pontifical Missions Societies, based in New York City. During his two years of service as director for the Church in Latin America, Father Small oversaw the grant making program and the development of plans to help the reconstruction of the Church in Haiti in the wake of last year’s earthquake.

As director of the USCCB effort to support the Church in Latin America, Father Molina will be responsible for the bishops’ grant initiative for the Church in the region, including the work to support the Haitian bishops’ Partnership for Reconstruction of the Church in Haiti (PROCHE by its acronym in French).

Father Molina is a priest of the Order of the Most Holy Trinity (the Trinitarians). He holds a Ph.D. in economics and a master’s degree in international political economy and development, both from Fordham University. He also received a Master of Arts degree in spirituality from the Washington Theological Union in Washington and speaks several languages.

The USCCB Office of National Collections manages eight of the national collections held in Catholic parishes throughout the year. The Collection for the Church in Latin America received over $7.1 million in donations from 150 U.S. Dioceses in 2010. The bishops’ Subcommittee on Latin America approved grants for 22 countries in the region totaling $7,563,961 that year. The special appeal for the Church in Haiti received over $84 million, of which 60 percent was committed for aiding the victims of the Earthquake and 40 percent has been committed for church reconstruction.

For more information on the USCCB’s work in Latin America, visit www.usccb.org/latinamerica.

http://www.usccb.org/comm/archives/2011/11-097.shtml

ASIA: SYRIA: MORE DEATHS DUE TO VIOLENCE

ASIA NEWS REPORT: The Syrian president issued orders to his security forces not to shoot at demonstrators on the “Friday of the free women of Syria”. Next week, talks are planned with a presidential adviser to discuss opposition demands.

Damascus (AsiaNews/Agencies) – Thousands of Syrians across the country took to the streets yesterday to demand democracy, reforms and an end to the Bashar al-Assad regime. For the ninth consecutive week, protests followed Friday prayers. President Bashar al-Assad is said to have issued a presidential order “not to shoot demonstrators,” warning that “whoever violates this [order] will bear full responsibility,” presidential advisor Bouthaina Shaaban told prominent political activist Louay Hussein.

Despite the announcement, local forces say that four people died yesterday and many more were wounded in what for organisers was the “Friday of the free women of Syria” in which they honoured the women who participated in anti-regime protests.

Yesterday’s demonstrations took place in Homs as well as Daraya, a Damascus suburb. Baniyas and Deraa are still under siege, with demonstrations held in check.

Next week, Louay Hussein and three veteran opposition activists will meet the presidential advisers to discuss demands made to the government.


AFRICA: KENYA: BISHOP APPEALS TO GOVERNMENT FOR INCREASED SECURITY

Agenzia Fides REPORT– Following the violent attacks of the Ethiopian Merille tribe against the population of Kenya, Archbishop Dominic Kimengich, Bishop of the Diocese of Lodwar, urged the Government to strengthen security along the border between Kenya and Ethiopia within the Turkana region. This month alone, in the city of Todonyang, 20 Kenyans were killed. In an interview with the Catholic Information Service for Africa, the Bishop complained about the seriousness of this situation and urged the government to take measures and strengthen the border areas. Bishop Kimengich said he was also very concerned about the fact that the area is scarsely guarded and thus unstable. One of the victims of the last attack was a member of the local parish Council and the others almost all Catholics. In another appeal, Bishop Kimengich asked the government to ensure food supply to the people of Turkana, who are nomads and live in semi-arid places and subjected to long periods of famine.

EUROPE: GREAT BRITAIN: BISHOPS RE-INTRODUCE FISH ON FRIDAYS

- The practice of abstaining from eating meat on Fridays is to return in England and Wales later this year.

“I think Catholics will welcome this,” said Archbishop Vincent Nichols of Westminster, president of the Bishops Conference of England & Wales.

The decision was made by the bishops of both countries this week and announced to the media May 13.

“What we have sought to do in this decision is to establish a shared practice, a shared habit, because habits that are carried out together are better learned and are stronger -- we give each other mutual support.”

“So that’s why there’s a simple, across-the-board expectation that this will be something that Catholics will do.”

The practice of abstaining from meat on a Friday was traditionally a way of remembering that Jesus Christ died on that day. The Church in England and Wales dropped the centuries-old custom in 1984. At the time they was stressed that other forms of Friday penance were also acceptable. The result, though, seemed to be that practice of Friday penance seemed to fall away altogether.

Not surprisingly, the bishops’ decision is being welcomed by the owner of the fish and chips shop around the corner from the cathedral in central London.

“It’s a good decision, primarily for religious reasons rather than reasons of business,” Osman Ismael of the Friars Inn told CNA.

“Interestingly, though, Friday is still our busiest day when it comes to selling fish and chips. So perhaps the custom never really went away.”

The decision will go into effect on September 16, the first anniversary of Pope Benedict’s visit to Scotland and England.

http://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/bishops-in-england-and-wales-re-establish-fish-on-fridays/

TODAY'S SAINT: MAY 15: ST. ISIDORE THE FARMER

St. Isidore the Farmer

PATRON OF SPANISH FARMERS, MIRACLE WORKER

Feast: May 15



Information:

Feast Day:May 15
Born:1070 at Madrid, Spain
Died:15 May 1130
Canonized:12 March 1622 by Pope Gregory XV
Patron of:farmers; day laborers

It is a misfortune which deserves to be lamented with floods of tears, that ignorance, obstinacy, and vice should so often taint a country life, the state which of all others is most necessary and important to the world; the most conformable to a human condition and to nature; the state which was sanctified by the example of the primitive holy patriarchs, and which affords the most favorable opportunities for the perfect practice of every virtue and Christian duty. What advantageous helps to piety did the ancient hermits seek in the deserts, which the circumstances of a country laborer do not offer? The life of St. Isidore is a most sensible proof of this assertion. He was born at Madrid, of poor but very devout parents, and was christened Isidore from the name of their patron, St. Isidore of Seville. They had not the means to procure him learning or a polite education; but, both by word and example, they infused into his tender soul the utmost horror and dread of all sin, and the most vehement ardor for every virtue, and especially for prayer. Good books are a great help to holy meditation; but not indispensably requisite. St. Irenaeus mentions whole nations which believed in Christ, and abounded in exemplary livers, without knowing the use of ink or paper. Many illustrious anchorets knew no other alphabet than that of humility and divine charity. The great St. Antony himself could not so much as read the Greek or Latin languages: nay, from the words of St. Austin, some doubt whether he could read even his own barbarous Egyptian dialect. Yet in the science of the saints, what philosopher or orator ever attained to the A B C of that great man? Learning, if it puffs up the mind, or inspires any secret self-sufficiency, is an impediment to the communications of the Holy Ghost: simplicity and sincere humility being the dispositions which invite him into the soul. By these was Isidore prepared to find him an interior instructor and comforter. His earnestness in seeking lessons and instructions of piety made him neglect no opportunity of hearing them; and so much the more tender and the deeper were the impressions which they left in his soul, as his desire was the stronger and the more pure. His patience in bearing all injuries and in overcoming the envy of fellow-servants by cordial kindnesses, his readiness to obey his masters, and in indifferent things to comply with the inclinations of others, and humbly to serve every one, gave him the most complete victory over himself and his passions. Labor he considered as enjoined him by God in punishment of sin, and for a remedy against it. And he performed his work in a spirit of compunction and penance. Many object that their labors and fatigues leave them little time for the exercises of religion. But Isidore, by directing his attention according to the most holy motives of faith, made his work a most perfect act of religion. He considered it as a duty to God. Therefore he applied himself to it with great diligence and care, in imitation of the angels in heaven, who in all things fulfil the will of God with the greatest readiness and alacrity of devotion. The more humbling and the more painful the labor was, the dearer it was to the saint, being a means the more suitable to tame his flesh, and a more noble part of his penance. With the same spirit that the saints subdued their bodies by toils in their deserts, Isidore embraced his task. He moreover sanctioned it by continual prayer. While his hand held the plough, he in his heart conversed with God, with his angel guardian, and the other blessed spirits; sometimes deploring the sins of the world, and his own spiritual miseries, at other times in the melting words of the royal prophet, raising his desires to the glory of the heavenly Jerusalem. It was chiefly by this perfect spirit of prayer, joined with, or rather engrafted upon a most profound humility and spirit of mortification, that St. Isidore arrived at so eminent a degree of sanctity as rendered him the admiration of all Spain. In his youth he was retained servant by a gentleman named John de Vargas of Madrid, to till his land and do his husbandry work. The saint afterwards took a most virtuous woman to wife, named Mary Toribia. Those who call her de la Cabeza were deceived by a chapel to which that name is given, because her head is kept in it. After the birth of one child, which died young, the parents, by mutual consent, served God in perfect continency.

St. Isidore continued always in the service of the same master. On account of his fidelity, he could say to him as Jacob did to Laban,1 that, to guard and improve his stock, he had often watched the nights, and had suffered the scorching heats of summer, and the cold of winter; and that the stock, which he found small, had been exceedingly increased in his hands. Don John de Vargas, after long experience of the treasure he possessed in this faithful ploughman, treated him as a brother, according to the advice of Ecclesiasticus,2 Let a wise servant be dear to thee as thy own soul. He allowed him the liberty of assisting daily at the public office of the church. On the other side, Isidore was careful by rising very early, to make his devotions no impediment to his business, nor any encroachment upon what he owed to his master. This being a duty of justice, it would have been a false devotion to have pretended to please God by a neglect of such an obligation; much less did the good servant indulge his compassionate charity to the poor, by relieving them otherwise than out of his own salary. The saint was sensible that in his fidelity, diligence, and assiduous labor consisted, in great part, the sanctification of his soul; and that his duty to his master was his duty to God. He also inspired his wife with the same confidence in God, the same love of the poor, and the same disengagement from the things of this world: he made her the faithful imitatrix of his virtues, and a partner in his good works. She died in 1175, and is honored in Spain among the saints. Her immemorial veneration was approved by pope Innocent XII. in 1697. See Benedict XIV., de Canoniz. 1. 2, c. 24, p. 246.

St. Isidore being seized with the sickness of which he died, foretold his last hour, and prepared himself for it with redoubled fervor, and with the most tender devotion, patience, and cheerfulness. The piety with which he received the last sacraments drew tears from all that were present. Repeating inflamed acts of divine love, he expired on the 15th of May, 1170, being near sixty years of age. His death was glorified by miracles. After forty years, his body was removed out of the churchyard into the church of St. Andrew. It has been since placed in the bishop's chapel, and during these five hundred years remains entire and fresh, being honored by a succession of frequent miracles down to this time. The following, among others, is very well attested. Philip III., in his return from Lisbon, was taken so ill at Casarubios del Monte, that his life was despaired of by his physicians. Whereupon the shrine of St. Isidore was ordered to be carried in a solemn procession of the clergy, court, and people, from Madrid to the chamber of the sick king. The joint prayers of many prevailed. At the same time the shrine was taken out of the church, the fever left the king; and upon its being brought into his chamber, he was perfectly cured. The year following the body of the saint was put into a new rich shrine, which cost one thousand six hundred ducats of gold. St. Isidore had been beatified a little before by Paul V., in 1619, at the solicitation of the same king. His solemn canonization was performed, at the request of king Philip IV., on the 12th of March, 1622; though the bull was only made public by Benedict XIII. See the life of St. Isidore, written by John of Madrid, one hundred and forty years after his death; and Card. Lambertini, de Canoniz. SS. t. 3.



source: http://www.ewtn.com/saintsHoly/saints/I/stisidorethefarmer.asp#ixzz1MS8BL3Jm

TODAY'S MASS READINGS: 4th SUN. OF EASTER/ YEAR A

Acts 2: 14, 36 - 41
14But Peter, standing with the eleven, lifted up his voice and addressed them, "Men of Judea and all who dwell in Jerusalem, let this be known to you, and give ear to my words.
36Let all the house of Israel therefore know assuredly that God has made him both Lord and Christ, this Jesus whom you crucified."
37Now when they heard this they were cut to the heart, and said to Peter and the rest of the apostles, "Brethren, what shall we do?"
38And Peter said to them, "Repent, and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of your sins; and you shall receive the gift of the Holy Spirit.
39For the promise is to you and to your children and to all that are far off, every one whom the Lord our God calls to him."
40And he testified with many other words and exhorted them, saying, "Save yourselves from this crooked generation."
41So those who received his word were baptized, and there were added that day about three thousand souls.
salms 23: 1 - 6
1The LORD is my shepherd, I shall not want;
2he makes me lie down in green pastures. He leads me beside still waters;
3he restores my soul. He leads me in paths of righteousness for his name's sake.
4Even though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I fear no evil; for thou art with me; thy rod and thy staff, they comfort me.
5Thou preparest a table before me in the presence of my enemies; thou anointest my head with oil, my cup overflows.
6Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life; and I shall dwell in the house of the LORD for ever.
1 Peter 2: 20 - 25
20For what credit is it, if when you do wrong and are beaten for it you take it patiently? But if when you do right and suffer for it you take it patiently, you have God's approval.
21For to this you have been called, because Christ also suffered for you, leaving you an example, that you should follow in his steps.
22He committed no sin; no guile was found on his lips.
23When he was reviled, he did not revile in return; when he suffered, he did not threaten; but he trusted to him who judges justly.
24He himself bore our sins in his body on the tree, that we might die to sin and live to righteousness. By his wounds you have been healed.
25For you were straying like sheep, but have now returned to the Shepherd and Guardian of your souls.
John 10: 1 - 10
1"Truly, truly, I say to you, he who does not enter the sheepfold by the door but climbs in by another way, that man is a thief and a robber;
2but he who enters by the door is the shepherd of the sheep.
3To him the gatekeeper opens; the sheep hear his voice, and he calls his own sheep by name and leads them out.
4When he has brought out all his own, he goes before them, and the sheep follow him, for they know his voice.
5A stranger they will not follow, but they will flee from him, for they do not know the voice of strangers."
6This figure Jesus used with them, but they did not understand what he was saying to them.
7So Jesus again said to them, "Truly, truly, I say to you, I am the door of the sheep.
8All who came before me are thieves and robbers; but the sheep did not heed them.
9I am the door; if any one enters by me, he will be saved, and will go in and out and find pasture.
10The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy; I came that they may have life, and have it abundantly.
Post a Comment