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Saturday, December 19, 2009

CATHOLIC WORLD NEWS: SAT. DEC. 19, 2009


CATHOLIC WORLD NEWS: SAT. DEC. 19, 2009: HEADLINES-
VATICAN: POPE: RECOGNIZES JOHN PAUL II/PIUS XII & MARY MCKILLOP-
EUROPE: SPAIN: LEGIONARIES OF CHRIST DISCLOSE PLAGIARISM-
AUSTRALIA: BIOGRAPHY OF MARY MACKILLOP AUSTRALIA'S 1ST SAINT-
AMERICA: USA: USCCB RELEASES CARDINAL DINARDO'S STATEMENT ON SENATE-
AFRICA: KENYA: FR. GERRY ROCHE, MISSIONARY, KILLED-
ASIA: INDONESIA: MUSLIM CROWD ATTACKS CHURCH-


VATICAN
POPE: RECOGNIZES JOHN PAUL II/PIUS XII & MARY MCKILLOP


Pope Benedict XVI on Saturday morning signed a decree recognizing the heroic virtues of Pope John Paul II, an important and necessary step on the path of beatification. Pope Pius XII was also recognized for his heroic virtues. The Pope acknowledged the martyrdom of the Polish priest Jerzy Popieluszko, who was killed in 1984 because of his religious and social work with the Solidarity trade union. Mary Ward, who lived in England in the seventeenth century was recognized for her heroic virture, and a miracle was recognized due to the intercession of Blessed Mary McKillop, the Australian woman who worked in education and with immigrants. This decree clears the way to her canonization.(SOURCE: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D9l3N4k-jwM




When the church venerates a saint, it announces the effectiveness of the Gospel and discovers with joy that Christ's presence in the world is able to transform human life and produce the fruit of salvation for all humanity. Pope Benedict XVI underlined this in his address to the Congregation for the Causes of Saints, to commemorate 40 years since the institution was created by Paul VI in 1969. Each beatification and canonization, the pope said, is for Christians a strong encouragement to live with intensity, and enthusiasm to follow Christ, moving toward the fullness of Christian life and perfection of charity. (SOURCE: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q1iSjum-8OA




EUROPE
SPAIN: LEGIONARIES OF CHRIST DISCLOSE PLAGIARISM


CNA reports that in an effort to distance itself from the wrongdoings of its founder, the Legion of Christ has recently circulated an internal memo detailing how a long venerated work of spirituality attributed to Fr. Marcial Maciel was actually a slight re-writing of a book from a little-known Spanish author.
“El Salterio de mis días” (The Psalter of my Days), according to the Legionary tradition, was regarded as written by Fr. Maciel during the period of the "great blessing," (1956-59), when the Mexican founder was submitted to a canonical process by the Vatican that was finally called off.
The memo now reveals that the text, very popular among the Legion in its original in Spanish and partially translated into English for internal use, was “based” on the little known work of a Spanish Catholic politician, Luis Lucía.
In a book titled “El Salterio de mis horas” (The Psalter of my Hours), Lucía, a Christian Democrat, reflected on his experience of being persecuted both by the Communist government during Spain's civil war (1936-1939), and the Nationalist government of Francisco Franco, who condemned him to death, but later changed the sentence to life in prison.
Lucía, the author of several political and spiritual books, probably wrote “The Psalter of my Hours” in the 30's. He was released from prison in 1941, and died in Valencia, Spain in 1943.
Despite being long forgotten, a small edition of “The Psalter of my Hours” was published in Valencia in 1956. It seems this was the edition Fr. Maciel read in Spain.
Although the memo does not describe Fr. Maciel's copying as plagiarism, a Spanish member of the Legion familiar with the text told CNA that Fr. Maciel's version reproduces "80% of the original book in content and style."(source: http://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/legion_of_christ_discloses_fr._maciels_plagiarism_to_its_members/


AUSTRALIA

BIOGRAPHY OF MARY MACKILLOP AUSTRALIA'S 1ST SAINT

Cath News report:

Mary MacKillop is the tough minded, astute political operator, struggling against patriarchal city based Church authorities to assist the poorest of the poor in Australia's most remote corners. She was no passive bystander in her fate. After being briefly excommunicated by her bishop, she begged passage to gain papal approval for her order above the heads of her bishops, battled a split among her own sisters, and then drove an expansion of missions across eastern Australia.
A Jesuit priest, James Martin, author of My Life with the Saints, suggests that the excommunicated nun's imminent canonisation should give heart not only to religious women in the United States undergoing a ''visitation'' by the Vatican but for divorcees and gay women disenfranchised from the Church. He playfully suggests MacKillop might be regarded as the patron saint of troublemakers, a reminder that being in trouble with the Church hierarchy is no barrier for holiness and a lesson to contemporary Catholics that holiness should not be conflated with unthinking, uncritical or blind obedience.
In Australia, supporters of women priests see in MacKillop a woman who, despite restraints on her by the Church, lived out the gospel message by her conscience to do great things.
Marilyn Hatton, Australian representative for Women's Ordination Worldwide, sees parallels between MacKillop's struggles and those agitating for a greater role for women's ministry. "She lived the gospel message as she saw it according to her conscience and there's parallels with women who are concerned about the ordination of women and women's leadership in the church," Hatton says. "Not just for feminist equality reasons but women in leadership is crucial to carrying on the faith. These women too are living the gospel message and they see the hierarchy of the church as having lost its way." - Linda Morris, Sydney Morning Herald (source

http://www.cathnews.com/article.aspx?aeid=18414



AMERICA
USA: USCCB RELEASES CARDINAL DINARDO'S STATEMENT ON SENATE


USCCB reports that responding to reports of a new “compromise” proposal on abortion in the U.S. Senate’s health care reform bill, Cardinal Daniel DiNardo today reaffirmed the position of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops that the legislation will be morally unacceptable “unless and until” it complies with longstanding current laws on abortion funding such as the Hyde amendment. Cardinal DiNardo is Archbishop of Galveston-Houston and Chairman of the Conference’s Committee on Pro-Life Activities.
The Cardinal commented on efforts by Senator Robert Casey (D-PA) to improve the Senate bill’s treatment of abortion. “Senator Casey’s good-faith effort to allow individuals to ‘opt out’ of abortion coverage actually underscores how radically the underlying Senate bill would change abortion policy. Excluding elective abortions from overall health plans is not a privilege that individuals should have to seek as the exception to the norm. In all other federal health programs, excluding abortion coverage is the norm. And numerous opinion polls show that the great majority of Americans do not want abortion coverage.”
“I welcome Senator Casey’s good-faith effort to improve this bill,” said Cardinal DiNardo. “In particular he has sought to improve protection for conscience rights, and to include programs of support for pregnant women and adoptive parents that we favor in their own right. However, these improvements do not change the fundamental problem with the Senate bill: Despite repeated claims to the contrary, it does not comply with longstanding Hyde restrictions on federal funding of elective abortions and health plans that include them.”
Cardinal DiNardo had written to the Senate on December 14, saying that “the Catholic bishops of the United States strongly support authentic reform of our ailing health care system.” His letter cited “three moral criteria for reform: respect for life and conscience; affordability for the poor; and access to much-needed basic health care for immigrants,” noting that so far the Senate bill “has fallen short of the example set by the House version of this legislation in each of these areas.”
On abortion funding, the Cardinal urged the Senate to “incorporate into this bill the longstanding and widely supported policies of current law, acknowledged and reaffirmed by the Senate itself” when it approved the Consolidated Appropriations Act for the new fiscal year on December 13. This Act reaffirmed the Hyde amendment and other laws that exclude elective abortions from health plans receiving federal funds -- including the plans that cover the Senators themselves and all other federal employees. The Senate so far has failed to reflect this same policy in its health care bill as the House has done, he said [see www.usccb.org/healthcare/DiNardo_1214_letter.pdf].
Cardinal DiNardo said December 18: “We continue to oppose and urge others to oppose the Senate bill unless and until this fundamental failure is remedied. And whatever the immediate outcome in the Senate, we will continue to work for health care reform which truly protects the life, dignity, conscience and health of all. As the bishops have said many times, ‘providing affordable and accessible health care that clearly reflects these fundamental principles is a public good, moral imperative and urgent national priority.’ In particular we will work vigorously to ensure that the substance of the House’s provision on abortion funding is included in final legislation. A special debt of gratitude is owed to House and Senate members, especially Rep. Bart Stupak (D-MI) and Sen. Ben Nelson (D-NE), who have placed their votes and reputation on the line to stand up for unborn children. Making this legislation consistent with longstanding federal law on abortion will not threaten needed authentic reform, but will help ensure its passage.”(SOURCE:http://www.usccb.org/comm/archives/2009/09-263.shtml

AFRICA
KENYA: FR. GERRY ROCHE, MISSIONARY, KILLED

CISA reports that Fr Gerry Roche of St Patricks Missionary Society, one of the pioneer Catholic missionaries in Kenya has been killed.His body was discovered in the parish house at Kiongo parish in Kericho diocese by Christians after he failed to turn up for mass on Friday morning.According to Fr, Paddy Hyland from the neighboring Motobo parish, the late priest had serious injuries to his head and neck. “He was hit in the head by robbers who crept into his house last night, neighbors did not report hearing any commotion,” Fr Hyland told Radio Amani in Nakuru by phone.He added that though they could not say for sure what had been stolen, his laptop, mobile phones and radio were missing.The late priest’s body has been moved to the Siloam Mortuary.Born 68 years ago in Athea, near Lamerick Ireland, Fr Roche arrived in Kenya in 1968 and went to Kaplong to study the Kipsigis language. He later went to Tanzania where he learnt Kiswahili.Roche has served in several parishes in Kericho diocese including Sacred Heart, (the current cathedral) Loret, Kipkelion, Chebanganga, Motobo and Kiongo where he was killed. He also founded St Mary’s Girls high school Kipkelion and Loret secondary school.Police have not made any arrests in connection to the death.(SOURCE: http://www.cisanewsafrica.org/story.asp?ID=4305


ASIA
INDONESIA: MUSLIM CROWD ATTACKS CHURCH

Asia news reports that the building was near completion and was to be used for Christmas Mass. Local Catholics are afraid that more attacks could take place during the festive season. Police and local authorities urge Catholics to celebrate the service anyway. Jakarta (AsiaNews) – Last night a crowd of angry Muslims, including women and children, attacked the Church of Saint Albert, in Bekasi Regency, about 30 kilometres east of Jakarta. The situation is now under control but the local Catholic community is afraid of an escalation before Christmas.
Kurniadi is a member of the committee charged with the church’s construction. He told AsiaNews, “Suddenly, a bunch of bikers arrived in the area where the church stands.” They had banners and kerosene tanks. “We don’t know why we were attacked,” he said.
Kristina Maria Renteana, who was present when the Church was attacked, said, “The mob had about a thousand people,” not only men, but “women and children” as well.
Running around in cars and motorbikes is a tradition for Indonesian Muslims during “national celebrations.”
Last night was the first day of the Islamic New Year, the start of the month of Muharram. Local sources told AsiaNews, on condition of anonymity, that the “crowd was made of people from Tarumajaya and Babelan”, two villages in North Bekasi where Islamic extremists are a majority.
Saint Albert’s Church, a chapel that is part of Saint Arnold’ Church in Bekasi, was not yet finished. Started on 11 May 2008, it had the required building permit for places of worship and was 80 per cent complete. Workers had finished the walls and the roof. Only ceramic floor tiles had to be laid.
Although not yet finished, it was set to host Christmas Mass for the local Christian community.
Now it is damaged but police and government authorities have urged the parish priest, Fr Joseph Jagadwa, to go ahead with the Mass anyway.(source: http://www.asianews.it/index.php?l=en&art=17159&size=A


TODAY'S SAINT


Bl. Urban V
POPE
Feast: December 19
Information:
Feast Day:
December 19
Born:
1310 Grizac, Languedoc, France
Died:
December 19, 1370 Avignon, France

Guillaume de Grimoard, born at Grisac in Languedoc, 1310; died at Avignon, 19 December, 1370. Born of a knightly family, he was educated at Montpellier and Toulouse, and became a Benedictine monk at the little priory of Chirac near his home. A Bull of 1363 informs us that he was professed at the great Abbey of St. Victor at Marseilles, where he imbibed his characteristic love for the Order of St. Benedict; even as pope he wore its habit. He was ordained at Chirac, and after a further course of theology and canon law at the universities of Toulouse, Montpellier, Paris, and Avignon, he received the doctorate in 1342. He was one of the greatest canonists of his day; was professor of canon law at Montpellier, and also taught at Toulouse, Paris, and Avignon; he acted successively as vicar-general of the Dioceses of Clermont and Uzès, was at an unknown date (before 1342) affiliated to Cluny, became prior of Notre-Dame du Pré (a priory dependent on St. Germain d'Auxerre), and in 1352 was named abbot of that famous house by Clement VI. With this date begins his diplomatic career. His first mission was to Giovanni Visconti, Archbishop and despot of Milan, and this he carried out successfully; in 1354 and 1360 he was employed on the affairs of the Holy See in Italy; in 1361 he was appointed by Innocent VI to the Abbacy of St. Victor at Marseilles, but in 1362 was once more dispatched to Italy, this time on an embassy to Joanna of Naples. It was while engaged on this business that the abbot heard of his election to the papacy. Innocent VI had died on 12 Sept. The choice of one who was not a cardinal was due to jealousies within the Sacred College, which made the election of any one of its members almost impossible. Guillaume de Grimoard was chosen for his virtue and learning, and for his skill in practical affairs of government and diplomacy. He arrived at Marseilles on 28 Oct., entered Avignon three days later, and was consecrated on 6 November, taking the name of Urban because, as he said, "all the popes who had borne the name had been saints". The general satisfaction which this election aroused was voiced by Petrarch, who wrote to the pope, "It is God alone who has chosen you".
On 20 November King John of France visited Avignon; his main purpose was to obtain the hand of Joanna of Naples, ward of the Holy See, for his son Philip, Duke of Touraine. In a letter of 7 November Urban had already approved her project of marriage with King James of Majorca, a king without a kingdom; by so doing the pope safeguarded his own independence at Avignon, which would have been gravely imperilled had the marriage of Joanna, who was also Countess of Provence, united to the Crown of France the country surrounding the little papal principality. The letter written by Urban to Joanna on 29 Nov., urging the marriage with Philip, was probably meant rather to appease the French king than to persuade the recipient. The betrothal of the Queen of Naples to James of Majorca was signed on 14 Dec. The enormous ransom of 3,000,000 gold crowns, due to Edward III of England from John of France by the treaty of Bretigny, was still in great part unpaid, and John now sought permission to levy a tithe on the revenues of the French clergy. Urban refused this request as well as another for the nomination of four cardinals chosen by the king. John also desired to intervene between the pope and Barnabò Visconti, tyrant of Milan. He was again refused, and when Barnabò failed to appear within the three months allowed by his citation, the pope excommunicated him (3 March, 1363). In April of the same year Visconti was defeated before Bologna. Peace was concluded in March, 1364; Barnabò restored the castles seized by him, while Urban withdrew the excommunication and undertook to pay half a million gold florins.
The Benedictine pope was a lover of peace, and much of his diplomacy was directed to the pacification of Italy and France. Both countries were overrun by mercenary bands known as the "Free Companies", and the pope made many efforts to secure their dispersal or departure. His excommunication was disregarded and the companies refused to join the distant King of Hungary in his battles with the Turks although the Emperor Charles IV, who came to Avignon in May, 1365, guaranteed the expenses of their journey and offered them the revenues of his kingdom of Bohemia for three years. War now broke out between Pedro the Cruel of Navarre and his brother Henry of Trastamare. Pedro was excommunicated for his cruelties and persecutions of the clergy, and Bertrand Duguesclin, the victor of Cocherel, led the companies into Navarre; yet they visited Avignon on their way and wrung blackmail from the pope. The Spanish war was quickly ended, and Urban returned to his fomer plan of employing the companies against the Turk. The Count of Savoy was to have led them to the assistance of the King of Cyprus and the Eastern Empire, but this scheme too was a failure. Urban's efforts were equally fruitless in Italy, where the whole land was overrun with bands led by such famous condottieri as the German Count of Landau and the Englishman Sir John Hawkwood. In 1365, after the failure of a scheme to unite Florence, Pisa, and the Italian communes against them, the pope commissioned Albornoz to persuade these companies to join the King of Hungary. In 1366 he solemnly excommunicated them, forbade their employment, and called on the emperor and all the powers of Christendom to unite for their extirpation. All was in vain, for though a league of Italian cities was formed in September of that year, it was disolved about fifteen months later owing to Florentine jealousy of the emperor.
Rome had suffered terribly through the absence of her pontiffs, and it became apparent to Urban that if he remained at Avignon the work of the warlike Cardinal Albornoz in restoring to the papacy the States of the Church would be undone. On 14 September, 1366, he informed the emperor of his determination to return to Rome. All men rejoiced at the announcement except the French; the king understood that the departure from Avignon would mean a diminution of French influence at the Curia. The French cardinals were in despair at the prospect of leaving France, and even threatened to desert the pope. On 30 April, 1367, Urban left Avignon; on 19 May he sailed from Marseilles, and after a long coasting voyage he reached Corneto, where he was met by Albornoz. On 4 June the Romans brought the keys of Sant' Angelo in sign of welcome, and the Gesuati carrying their branches in their hands and headed by their founder, Blessed John Colombini, preceded the pope. Five days later he entered Viterbo, where he dwelt in the citadel. The disturbed state of Italy made it impossible for Urban to set out to Rome until he had gathered a considerable army, so it was not till 16 Oct. that he entered the city at the head of an imposing cavalcade, under the escort of the Count of Savoy, the Marquess of Ferrara, and other princes.
The return of the pope to Rome appeared to the contemporary world both as a great event and as a religious action. The pope now set to work to improve the material and moral condition of his capital. The basilicas and papal palaces were restored and decorated, and the Papal treasure, which had been preserved at Assisi since the days of Boniface VIII, was distributed to the city churches. The unemployed were put to work in the neglected gardens of the Vatican, and corn was distributed in seasons of scarcity; at the same time the discipline of the clergy was restored, and the frequentation of the sacraments encouraged. On 17 October, 1368, the emperor joined the pope at Viterbo. Before leaving Germany he had confirmed all the rights of the Church, and Urban hoped for his help against the Visconti, but Charles allowed himself to be bribed. On 21 Oct. the pope and emperor entered Rome together, the latter humbly leading the pontiff's mule. On 1 Nov. Charles acted as deacon at the Mass at which Urban crowned the empress. For more than a century pope and emperor had not appeared thus in amity. A year later the Emperor of the East, John V Palaeologus, came to Rome seeking assistance against the infidel; he abjured the schism and was received by Urban on the steps of St. Peter's. On 5 Sept., 1370, "sad, suffering and deeply moved", Urban embarked at Corneto. In a Bull of 26 June he had told the Romans that his departure was motived by his desire to be useful to the Universal Church and to the country to which he was going. It may be, too, that the pope saw that the next conclave would be free at Avignon but not in Italy. Charles V joyfully sent a fleet of richly adorned galleys to Corneto; the pope did not long survive his return (24 Sept.) to Avignon. His body was buried in Notre-Dame des Doms at Avignon but was removed two years later, in accordance with his own wish, to the Abbey Church of St. Victor at Marseilles. Miracles multiplied around his tomb. His canonization was demanded by King Waldemar of Denmark and promised by Gregory XI as early as 1375, but did not take place owing to the disorders of the time. His cultus was approved by Pius IX in 1870.
The pope's private life was that of a monk, and he was always accessible to those who sought his aid.
He was a great patron of learning, founded universities at Cracow (by a Bull of 1364) and at Vienna (by a Bull of 1365), and caused the emperor to create the University of Orange; he revised the statutes of the University of Orléans; and gave great assistance to the universities of Avignon and Toulouse. At Bologna he supported the great college founded by Albornoz and paid the expenses of many poor students whom he sent thither. He also founded a studium at Trets (later removed to Manosque), but his greatest foundations were at Montpellier. His buildings and restorations were considerable, especially at Avignon, Rome, and Montpellier. He approved the orders of Brigittines and Gesuati, and canonized his godfather, St. Elzéar of Sabran.
(SOURCE: http://www.ewtn.com/saintsHoly/saints/U/blurbanv.asp


TODAY'S GOSPEL

Luke 1: 5 - 25
5
In the days of Herod, king of Judea, there was a priest named Zechari'ah, of the division of Abi'jah; and he had a wife of the daughters of Aaron, and her name was Elizabeth.
6
And they were both righteous before God, walking in all the commandments and ordinances of the Lord blameless.
7
But they had no child, because Elizabeth was barren, and both were advanced in years.
8
Now while he was serving as priest before God when his division was on duty,
9
according to the custom of the priesthood, it fell to him by lot to enter the temple of the Lord and burn incense.
10
And the whole multitude of the people were praying outside at the hour of incense.
11
And there appeared to him an angel of the Lord standing on the right side of the altar of incense.
12
And Zechari'ah was troubled when he saw him, and fear fell upon him.
13
But the angel said to him, "Do not be afraid, Zechari'ah, for your prayer is heard, and your wife Elizabeth will bear you a son, and you shall call his name John.
14
And you will have joy and gladness, and many will rejoice at his birth;
15
for he will be great before the Lord, and he shall drink no wine nor strong drink, and he will be filled with the Holy Spirit, even from his mother's womb.
16
And he will turn many of the sons of Israel to the Lord their God,
17
and he will go before him in the spirit and power of Eli'jah, to turn the hearts of the fathers to the children, and the disobedient to the wisdom of the just, to make ready for the Lord a people prepared."
18
And Zechari'ah said to the angel, "How shall I know this? For I am an old man, and my wife is advanced in years."
19
And the angel answered him, "I am Gabriel, who stand in the presence of God; and I was sent to speak to you, and to bring you this good news.
20
And behold, you will be silent and unable to speak until the day that these things come to pass, because you did not believe my words, which will be fulfilled in their time."
21
And the people were waiting for Zechari'ah, and they wondered at his delay in the temple.
22
And when he came out, he could not speak to them, and they perceived that he had seen a vision in the temple; and he made signs to them and remained dumb.
23
And when his time of service was ended, he went to his home.
24
After these days his wife Elizabeth conceived, and for five months she hid herself, saying,
25
"Thus the Lord has done to me in the days when he looked on me, to take away my reproach among men."
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